Get A Pefect Shot! Let Learn How To Measure Length Of Pull?

Many new shooters may not quite grasp the concept of length of pull. If you aren’t familiar with long guns, it’s probably not something you’ve spent time worrying about or measuring. A long gun’s length of pull is the distance from the end of the gun up to the middle of the trigger. When looking for the right gun, length of pull is one of the most critical measurements which will determine whether or not the gun will fit you. Here, we’ll take a quick look at how to measure length of pull.

What goes into determining length of pull?

There are a number of factors to consider when measuring a gun’s length of pull. How long is your neck? Are you in shape or do you have fat poofy cheeks? And how big are you overall as a person?

Your personal dimensions must coincide well with those of the gun you hope to use. What is the long gun’s drop at heel and drop at comb? Trapshooters does a really great job in this article of breaking down length of pull measurements.

  • Drop at heel refers to how much distance sits in between the butt of the gun and the line of sight.
  • Drop at comb refers to the distance that sits between the line of sight and the comb of the stock. In case you aren’t familiar with this, the comb of stock is the part of the gun where you rest your cheek, whether poofy or not.
  • One thing to note here: length of pull is not measured by the distance between your elbow and your thumb. My grandpa told me this when I was child, but it has been proven false. So, when someone tells you measuring length of pull is that simple, you can refute the claim!

Why correct length of pull matters

To optimize your shooting skills, having the correct length of pull is important because it allows for comfort and familiarity. Hunting is a sport of patience and repetition. Therefore, having a gun that is well suited to you along with the proper tools for the field will greatly increase your chances of success. Here is exactly why length of pull is important:

  • If the length of pull is too short, your line of sight can be impeded. Maybe it’s by the thumb coming into the field of vision during aiming, or maybe the gun just never sits quite right and getting the best aim is impossible.
  • When the length of pull is too long, accuracy is directly impacted. Your clothes may shift the aim by moving the butt of the gun. Or the gun may wobble slightly as you zero in because your arm isn’t able to properly situate the equipment.
  • Here is a great video on accurately measuring length of pull:

Measuring the length of pull

I always encourage young and new shooters to be professionally fitted to a gun for proper length of pull. That way, nothing is left to chance. They will likely run through several long guns until the perfect one that meets both your personal criteria (including budget) and the correct measurements is identified.

If you do choose to measure it yourself, remember to fit for comfort as much as you are fitting for measurements with a ruler or however you measure at home. It is critically important that the gun fits you – how much fun is doing an activity with improper equipment? Not very much!

It is possible to become comfortable with a gun’s length of pull even if it isn’t perfectly suited to you. This is much easier to do for experienced shooters and those that have spent their lives in the field trying out different long guns in different situations. Practice makes perfect, and experience makes comfort. That is my motto with shooting, and I encourage you to adapt that motto as well. For the newbies, get that gun measured from the middle of the trigger back to the buttstock and don’t settle for anything that doesn’t feel right!

Conclusion

As I’ve said many times before, shooting is all about comfort. Accuracy comes from comfort, and so does a budding passion for a life of hunting. Using a long gun with the correct length of pull measurements will put you on the right track for both of those. Double check the measurements, especially if buying a new gun.

If you’ve enjoyed this article, go ahead and share on your social media channels so that others can learn how to correctly measure length of pull and we can put those old rumors to bed for good. Leave any questions in the comments – we’ll get a discussion going.

What Is The Correct Way To Shoulder A Shotgun

An accurate shot begins with a proper mount and shoulder of the shotgun. As you progress as a hunter, from beginner to a more experienced shooter, certain patterns will begin to take form. One of the most important of these patterns is finding the best way to shoulder a shotgun.

Experienced shooters have their shouldering skills down to a science. It takes almost no effort to get the butt of the gun into the pocket and stance ready to go. I’ve been using the same shouldering stance since I started shooting, and I’m going to walk you through I there today. Let’s get started.

1.It starts with the feet

Just like in football, good footwork is incredibly important in shooting. The shoes that you wear should be well broken in field boots, or other active wear that are comfortable and flexible. Start by placing the feet about shoulder width apart. A little more than half of your body weight should be on the front foot, with knees bent and ready for action.

I usually draw a reference to bowling when describing the foot placement to people. I know this sounds weird, but hear me out – when bowling, it is important to position your body in a way that drives the ball toward to the pins you are aiming at. The same thing is true in shooting. Aim your back foot towards the target (as best you can).

  • Make sure your feet are loose and agile, should you need to shift. We’ll talk about this more in the next section.
  • Stand up straight at first, and then loosen yourself down into position with knees bent. This will keep you from standing to firm, standing to far forward, or not being ready to react and shift.
  • Don’t tense up. Part of accurate shooting and the correct way to shoulder a shotgun is to be loose and ready.
  • Here is a great quick video on shouldering a shotgun.

2.Body movement and flexibility

In shooting, it is important to keep all body movement symmetrical to the gun and to the rest of the body. The gun hits the pocket at a 45-degree angle. Your eyes peer over the top of the shotgun at the same angle. The back of the head is perpendicular to the spine.

Once in position, all movement should come from the hips. Twisting and turning from there will allow you to keep the gun level and your aim on point. Be careful that you aren’t shifting your back around while in position. I always like to keep my knees bent slightly, for that extra bit of added pop. If I need to do any height adjustment, it comes from the knees. I never lift my toes or ankles up off the ground – it is important to keep the feet level, flat, and comfortable. Toes should be able to jiggle but the feet shouldn’t actually move.

Any shift required to hone in on a target should be initiated by a twist of the hips. I encourage you to do a bit of stretching before heading to the range or out in the field. This will ensure that you are loose and won’t pull any muscles should you need to move slightly to zero in on a target.

3.Find the pocket

Let’s start here by lifting the right arm. If you aren’t already familiar with the pocket between your shoulder blade and neck, feel around until you find it. Before ever trying to fit your gun to the pocket, take a block of wood, a book, or some other firm object in your opposite hand and try to fit it into the pocket.

Once it’s in there, move around a bit. Find the positioning with the least pushback. Try to move your shoulder around in circles and ensure that the object doesn’t just slide right out or cause any discomfort. When the gun is in there, it should have no problem staying there with the small bit of applied pressure from the other hand. The National Shooting Sports Foundation does a great job of showcasing fitting the gun to the shoulder, and realizing that you don’t have a gun fit problem, in the below video.

4.Consistency

Face should connect with the same spot on the gun each time. You want your eye to be right over the center of the rib, providing a clean line of vision. This shouldn’t impact either the comfort level of the gun in the pocket or the accuracy of the shot. In order to have consistency, you’ve got to have comfort.

This is a repeating theme that you’ll find in each of the tips I’ve provided here. The best way to shoulder a shotgun is also the most comfortable way to shoulder a shotgun. There shouldn’t be much pressure on the shoulder before the shot. During the shooting process, the movement of the gun should trigger a similar reaction from the body. It should be a slithering snake-like process. The gun fires, the body reacts and moves with the shot, and then the posture is reset post-shot.

After the shot, you shouldn’t have pain the shoulder, wrist, or elsewhere. It should be as though not much has happened – the main thing going through your body should be excitement at making a great shot from the pocket.

Conclusion

When asking yourself, ‘What is the best way to shoulder a shotgun,’ the correct answer is to find the pocket and then get yourself comfortable. These steps should help you to establish a solid, actionable stance that will increase both your accuracy and your comfort. Whether at the range or in the field, shouldering the shotgun correctly is as important as using the right ammo. Do some practice in your garage, and if necessary, have your gun personally fitted to you. Any gun shop can make this happen easily. If you enjoyed this article, please share on your social channels. Education is key to top performance when shooting. Go ahead and post a picture of you in your shooting stance down below in the comments. I can’t wait to see what you’re shooting!

How To Move A Gun Safe. Best Way You Need To Know

It’s that dreaded moment. The time when you have to move a gun safe from one place to another. Gun safes are notoriously heavy and difficult to move, much like that furniture you inherited from Grandma. Everything about the process basically sucks, but it is doable. Follow this simple series of steps on how to move a gun safe and you’ll have that thing in its new location in no time.

How to move a gun safe

How to move a gun safe

Initial steps

Get the safe as light as possible by removing anything that doesn’t need to be inside. Ammo, anything else that can be put in a separate box for now, should be taken out. If moving to a new house, park the moving truck with the rear facing either the sidewalk or driveway that you will be approaching from. Lower the ramp and be sure the path to get to the truck is made as easy as possible.

For larger safes, provide the team with worker gloves if they don’t already have some. I also find it helpful to provide pizza and beer to those that help me move – it seems to get everyone in a better mood and creates a team atmosphere. Here is a great video.

  • Cover walls, door openings, other furniture, and important items with scratch resistant material. Anything that the safe will pass by in the home should be protected.
  • Clear the path with which the safe will travel to an extra foot on each side, wherever possible. A bit of wobbling and curving will likely occur during transport. You don’t want anything to be struck by the safe should it or your team become frenzied.
  • Get a plank of wood or other solid object to act as a ramp if there are any steps leading from the front door to the vehicle or other area where the safe will be. If this doesn’t seem doable, you’ll need a couple extra people on the lower side as you move the safe down the step.

Moving larger gun safes (over 3 feet tall, too heavy for one person to lift)

Gun safes are heavy in order to make them near impossible to steal should someone intrude into your home. Moving them about is intentionally a process. I moved my 800-pound gun safe from our old house in Naples, Florida to our new spot in Lyndon, Washington and learned the hard way that gun safes aren’t the most transportable of items. We spent an extra grand on gas on the drive because of the added weight. However, I picked up these tips:

  • Get a furniture dolly, or a forklift if you can. I recommend buying one from a home improvement store instead of renting or borrowing one. That way, you’ll have it whenever you need it.
  • When you’re ready to move, have a team of people stand on one side of the safe and lean it back. Slide the dolly underneath the safe and stabilize.
    • I’ll note here that it is super important that the safe be balanced well on the dolly. Due to immense weight, it can fall over and crush individuals if not properly set. Here is a video on the process.
  • Ensure your path is cleared, and begin slowly moving the best gun safe out of the room.

Corners and Immoveable Objects in the way

Going around corners can be tough. The most important thing is to remain calm and proceed slowly. If you can, have a person position themselves on the far side of the safe (the side opposing the direction you are turning into) to provide added support from the back side. This person can forcefully push into the rear as the safe is moved around the corner. Go wide – by this I mean swing the dolly a bit further out than you initially think is necessary. That will allow the safe and dolly to be turned at an easier angle without striking the wall or toppling onto the person guarding the rear.

Loading into moving trucks/vehicles

Ready to exert some strength? Good, because this is the time to show off how those gym sessions have sculpted your muscles.

  • Assemble the entire team (add a few extra people if you can) at the bottom of the ramp leading into the back of the truck.
  • Everyone will need to position themselves comfortable behind the safe. If you have any truck straps, this is a great time to tie them around the safe and have one person stand in front of the safe and pull while everyone else pushes. While pulling won’t be super effective, the main benefit here is that this person acts as a sort of guide to ensure the safe doesn’t derail or fall off the dolly.
  • Once you start pushing the safe up the ramp, DON’T STOP! Momentum is the most important factor here. Get those grunts out and keep pushing. By the time you reach the top of the ladder, you will have enough momentum to easily move the gun safe into the desired position inside the truck.

Moving smaller gun safes

With smaller ones, the process of how to move a gun safe is basically the same buy slightly less intense. Follow the above steps and make adjustments where necessary – you won’t need as many people or as much strength. If the safe can be carried, be sure to have at least two people for added support. Set the safe down gently and be mindful of doorways, walls, and protruding objects when passing through hallways. Do not set the safe on top of anything else – it’s weight may crush other objects.

Conclusion

best gun safe

This is one of the best gun safe

Now you know how to move a gun safe. The process is tough but can be enjoyable with friends and a good attitude. One thing to keep in mind is that when moving the gun safe to a new house, identify in advance the best location for the safe. In the garage or a room where it will not need to be moved ever again. If you enjoyed this article, please share. Knowledge is power, just like teamwork! If you have any tips or anything, feel free to leave them in the comments and we’ll get a discussion going. Check out my recent post about best ar10 scope

Are You Own a Shotgun? Let’s Find How To Aim A Shotgun

Finding the right stance and getting comfortable with aiming is something that all new shooters have to go through. It’s a fun process – it allows for a bit of personalization and flare to come into the sport.

When I first started hunting with my dad and uncle and a kid, it took me several times of going to the range and trying out new positions. Once I became comfortable, I began honing my aim.

While much of it is about feeling, there are some general guidelines to follow. Here are some tips for how to aim a shotgun.

Learning the proper stance

Spend any time hanging out at a gun range and you’ll likely see some interesting stances. Some stand straight and tall, others do weird things with their arms. My favorite is the old guy who stands with his feet super far apart – maybe he’s worried about knocking himself over when he takes a shot?

  • The best stance that will allow you to aim your shotgun easily is to put your feet between armpit length and shoulder length apart. Much further than that and you’re lowering your line of vision and not optimizing for the best balance points. Closer together and you’re liable to blow yourself over on kickback.
  • Just over half of your weight should be on the front foot. Not too much, because you want to remain balanced and stable. But enough that your momentum is slightly forward. If too much is on the back foot, you’ll find that you shoot over the top a lot because you’re leaning back when the shot is taken.
  • Stand at a 45-degree angle to the target. This allows for comfortable and proper shotgun positioning.
  • I always recommend shooters do a bit of rocking back and forth. Lightly lift the toes in the process. This familiarizes you with the stance.
  • This video here goes over the basics to know how to aim a shotgun.

Finding your ‘point of aim’

Here is where a shooter can put a bit of their personal vibe into their shooting stance and shotgun aim. Now you’re in your stance and working on the rocking motion. If you haven’t already been doing so, hold the gun in a shooting position during the rocking process. Notice where you feel most comfortable during the rock. Likely, it will be right about where 55-60% of the weight is on the front foot. Once you’ve identified this position, STOP!

That is your natural point of aim. The object with this term, as it relates to how to aim a shotgun, is that this is the angle where you’ll shoot the target. This is where the bullseye will be directly in front, or where the clay will be broken by your bullet.

It’s important to remember that you’re not shooting a rifle. Don’t stand fully sideways with the gun near the shoulder. I prefer to have the stance a bit more open here.

Keep it flexible and position your head

When aiming your shotgun, the goal is to be able to shoot in more than one direction without becoming uncomfortable or urged to reset yourself. Make sure you are able to comfortably position your head above the barrel and hone in on the line of site.

  • I urge shooters to rock a bit every time they get settled into the stance. Come to the same final position the same way every time. Eventually it will be a habit.
  • Don’t pull your head off the stock. The shot should hit wherever the eyes are pointed. If you find yourself looking down at the barrel, or left-to-right or vice versa, focus on keeping your eyes and head positioned correctly.
  • Keep your feet planted when turning, and move with your upper body. Going back to the whole flexibility thing, following and aiming at a moving target should be an easy thing to do. It shouldn’t require you to jerk yourself around in a circle.
  • Don’t close your eyes. Train yourself to keep both eyes open during the shot. Depth perception is as important as anything else in relation to how to aim a shotgun.
  • Work on the mount and positioning on the shoulder. It shouldn’t be a painful thing when you pull the trigger. Slide the gun back and forth until you’re able to find a comfortable position.
  • Here is some advice on leading your target.

Conclusion

Aiming a shotgun is really about making the gun a part of your body. If it isn’t a natural stance, you’re never going to feel comfortable as a shooter. The right point of aim for you is the one that allows the most flexibility without compromising any sturdiness or power. Remember the rocking motion. I’ve been hunting for over fifty years now and still rock into my stance every single time.

If you’ve enjoyed this article, I urge you to share it on social media to help others get accustomed to finding the best possible stance and aiming their shotgun correctly. Feel free to leave any tips here in the comments, I’m always game for upping the ante a bit!

Which Is Better Between .260 Remington And 6.5 Creedmoor?

Do similar rounds produce similar results? Any experienced shooter will tell you that that is not always the case. For direct proof, look no further than the .260 Remington vs 6.5 Creedmoor. Both of these are a perfect match for the .308 Winchester rifle. In many cases, if you weren’t the one who loaded the rounds, you may not be able to even tell a difference.

My personal experience has led me to prefer the .260 Remington over the 6.5 Creedmoor. We’ll get into why in this article. I’m old school, is the main reason. This guy pretty much sums up my thoughts on the .260 Remington in this video:

The old classic vs. the new hotshot

.260 Remington is a classic among long-time riflemen, having been the backbone of what we’ve used for such a long time. The reason for this is that seasoned hunters have expertise in reloading. .260 Remington rounds necessitate this, while 6.5 Creedmoor rounds are better for those without that reloading expertise.

As many new hunters aren’t trained in the art of the reload, Creedmoor can significantly reduce the learning curve when looking to get out into the field. Additionally, the Creedmoor has a shoulder angle that is sharper than the Remington. This comes with less body taper

Additionally, less water is held by the Creedmoor. This won’t affect certain shooters, but it’s worth noting. It can fit a longer bullet because of this, but the general use of handheld cartridges has all but eliminated any benefit there. Here, a video description of the two takes place.

High performance vs. low performance, and vice versa

The brass on the .260 Remington is of a higher quality than the 6.5 Creedmoor. With the Creedmoor, you may find that the brass isn’t as long lasting. This affects hunters as they experience less overall durability and flow with their shooting than if they were to use the .260 Remington.

The Creedmoor’s case is a bit shorter than the .260 Remington’s. The Remington is undoubtedly faster as a result of the higher case capacity, necessitating less maintenance in the field. Remingtons are better for those looking to use a bolt gun, but for the semi-automatic inclined, the 6.5 Creedmoor is the better choice. I’m always using bolt, so the Remington works for me.

When it comes to distance shooting, the Remington will be solid up to at least 800-900 yards.

Personal preference and skill level are a big factor

Beyond that, the accuracy can lose a bit of its dependability depending on skill and build. I’ve got mine accurate up to 1000, but I’ve been doing this for a long time. I will concede that the Creedmoor can perfectly nail a target from 1000 yards when built the right way and taken good care of. If everything is prepped correctly, that is the better option for really long distances.

I recommend keeping a chart of data from the rounds you fire with both. Test them out, and through your charts you can identify which one you are more accurate with, and which one makes the overall process easier for you. Keep track of powder, distance, velocity, and muzzle energy. I also encourage testing at different distances. Keep a record of 100 yard accuracy percentage compared with longer shots. Those who are new to long distance shooting should stick with the choice that they are the most comfortable with.

I also encourage shoots to watch some videos online of different practices with both options. Here are a couple great options:

  • Creedmore footage

  • Remington footage

 

Conclusion

At the end of the day, it really depends on personal preference. Take into consideration which bullets you plan to shoot, and whether or not you are willing to switch them to accommodate aesthetics or if you are hard lined on performance and personal comfort. I’ve grown so accustomed to the .260 Remington over the decades that I’m not going to be switching anything up at this point.

If you enjoyed this article, please share on social media – us gun freaks always love a good debate on equipment. Feel free to share your personal opinions in the comment section here, as I’m sure we’ve got a community of 6.5 Creedmoor users out there that have thoughts on the matter.

What Are The Best Scope For Ruger 10/22?

Perhaps the best part of using a rifle like the Ruger 10/22 is its sheer popularity among American shooters. The gun is very popular, and because of this, there are a variety of scopes and mod options that have become popular as well.

I’ve been using a Ruger since my Dad first took me out hunting as a kid, and have become very familiar with the different scope options available. Today, we’ll take a look at three options that are the best scope for a Ruger 10/22 and why they stand apart from others.

Top Our Pick For Best Scopes For Ruger 10/22 In 2017

Top 3 Best Scopes For AR 10 On The Market

This is my review about 3 scope for ruger 10/22 on the market, it will help you find the best for hunting. Check out it:

1. TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm 30/30 Reticle .22 Riflescope (Matte Finish)

TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm better scope for the Ruger 10/22

TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm 30/30 Reticle .22 Riflescope (Matte Finish)

The TascoRimfire Series is top of the line, all the way. In its price class, you won’t find a better scope for the Ruger 10/22. The HD vision is superb. It really hones in on far-away targets and holds the view long enough to pull the trigger and get a good shot. I’m a fan because of these features:

  • The ruger 10/22 optics are fully coated. I’ve never had any sight problems with this scope, even after using it in multiple lighting scenarios and times of day.

  • The 50-yard parallax setting is standard and functional. Experienced shooters will find lines of sight to be as expected based on distance, terrain, and weather

  • The accuracy is spot on. Take it to the range once before heading out on a hunt and you’ll be completely comfortable with it.

One thing I always suggest with this scope is to purchase a separate weaver rail to go along with it. You can get one that is of much higher quality, and will last longer, than the one that Tasco makes. Also, buy additional scope rings if you don’t have any on hand. They will be necessary for proper and secure mounting.

Another hint is to make sure everything is properly mounted and fastened, so that the reticle doesn’t move. If you’re using this scope regularly, check the security of the mounting each time you head out.Be sure to test it at both close up and further away shooting distances to get comfortable before forming your final opinion on the scope. I found that it took a couple different scenarios before I fully grasped what it has to offer.

2. Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

When looking to step up the scope game significantly, this scope from Nikon is the perfect piece of equipment.

Open circle aiming points are very accurate from 50 to 150 yards (I’ve actually used it for shots that I estimated were up to 200, but not with the accuracy of under 150).

The crosshair is right in the line of vision and never blurry or faded, something that is frequently a problem with cheaper scopes.

  • The Nikon Eco-Glass lenses are arsenic-free. They also are incredibly vibrant when in front of the eye – I’ve never had any issues with reflection or fog

  • Zero reset is required on elevation and windage. After you’ve zeroed the scope, there shouldn’t be any adjustments necessary to keep it accurate unless the mounting is altered. Move a click up, and it can be easily reset
  • Nikon has perfectly engineered this scope for .22 ammunition, and there is no better weapon for .22 than the Ruger 10/22. It is the perfect combination.

Make sure your on-hand mounts are made for the Ruger 10/22 – special order them if not. Mounting and zero issues may result from mounts that are not for this specific rifle. Other than that, this is a solid scope and worth the spend. I’ve bought a few of them for different .22s and always have been satisfied. If you’re looking to impress with a great gift, this is the best option available.This is a good scope for ruger 10/22

3. Simmons 511039 3 - 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

Simmons 511039 3 - 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

Simmons 511039 3 – 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

The Simmons Riflescope is built with optical glass lenses that, in my experience, are incredibly functional. For an economical .22 scope such as this one, that feature really stands out. Their HydroShield lens coating that they brag about is optimized as well. Two of the three scopes we’re talking about today are far from the high-end market, proving that Ruger 10/22 scopes don’t have to break the bank.

The eyepiece is bright and vibrant, allowing for easy target sighting and zero fatigue when following a target or working to find the best shot location on the target. The clarity cannot be beat.

Here are the best features:

  • The mounting rings that come with the Simmons Riflescope are not well-suited to the Ruger 10/22. As typical, I suggest buying additional rings and weaver rail. It can be mounted.

  • The rubber surface is easy to adjust, even in rain, heat, or damp conditions. Once zeroed, the scope is as accurate as anything on the market.

  • It mounts to other options, but seems to be specifically designed for the Ruger 10/22 due to its popularity.

Above all other scopes, this one gives the most bang for the buck. In the hunting world, that goes a long way because it allows more flexibility for other add-ons and modifications.

Conclusion

There are a variety of best scopes on the market for a Ruger 10/22. These three are all well-suited for action, whether that be the range or out in the hunting field. The trendiness of rimfire shooting has led to the development of a lot of new scopes, but I always stand by the old classics. For mounting help, check out this great video.:

If you will reference this article in your upcoming scope purchase, we’d love it if you shared what you found helpful via social media. That way, others can learn more about the scopes as well. I’d love to hear which one you ended up going with. Feel free to leave a comment here with thoughts and we’ll get a conversation going.

How To Use The Binoculars In The Right Way

Binoculars are the perfect addition for just about any outdoor activity. Hunting, fishing, bird watching, you name it. Binoculars improve visibility and help the user specifically focus on their target. If taking a shot or observing an animal from afar, they improve accuracy over a long range. Here are the best practices for how to use binoculars.

Set up the binoculars for optimal use

  • Adjust the distance between the two eye barrels to be appropriate for your face. Binoculars will stretch or pull tighter and hold that position for use. If the binoculars aren’t property set to you, you will see black edges in the peripherals.
  • Use the neck strap. You don’t want to set the binoculars down and forget them or risk having the settings compromised. By strapping them around your neck, you can relax the set when not in use while still having it ready to go very quickly.
  • Preferably, purchase a pair of binoculars with a diopter. This allows the user to focus both eye pieces at the same time, as opposed to having to do the process twice and risk them not being set equally. This can cause blur or otherwise be distracting.
  • This video walks users through setting their binoculars.

Identify your target and focus

Before zooming in, figure out exactly what it is that you’re going to look at. To get set, pick a solid object up against a solid color. A building, tree, or tall plant set against a cloudless sky is perfect.

  • Turn the diopter or central focus wheel until the object is perfectly in focus. Be sure that both eyes are set and feel comfortable. If you’ve gone too far in, zoom back out. I always recommend testing a few settings, even after you’ve found one that feels great. That way, you are confident the setting used is the best one.
  • For fine focusing, close the right eye. Using only the left, adjust the diopter to the specific setting that feels perfectly in view. Be sure the object you are focusing on is in clear, fine focus.
  • If your eyes are strained or fatigued, re-adjust. There’s nothing wrong with using more than one focus setting throughout the day.

Clean the binoculars

After use, you’ll want to clean the binoculars for next time. This helps keep the set optimized for long term use. You’ll notice that dirty lenses make it incredibly hard to find the perfect zoom and focal points. This can lead to headaches and fatigue. When cleaning, be careful not to scratch the lenses!

  • Using an eyeglass brush or cloth, wipe away any dirt or particles that have collected on the outside of the lends.
  • Use eyeglass solution to really get those lenses shining.
  • Look through the binoculars to ensure there are no smudges or streaks on the lenses.
  • Return the binoculars to their case and store them in a place that won’t get to hot or cold.
  • Here is a great video on cleaning binoculars.

In recent years, I’ve been using binoculars more and more to hone in my hunting and bird watching. A good pair really ups the visibility, and improves accuracy with long range shooting. Now that you’ve discovered the joy of using binoculars, please share this article on social media so that those closest to you can do the same! I love hearing about new tricks of the trade and activities, so feel free to comment as well.

How To Adjust A Scope? The Important Thing You Need To Know

The scopes on today’s rifles adjust to point-of-impact specifications. A huge plus for hunters and shooters, accuracy in long distance shooting is greatly improved. The scope has knobs on the top and bottom, both of which have significant impact on the zeroing in your shot. Old timers like me learned to adjust a scope back on Civil War-era weapons. Nowadays, it is much easier, but still takes practice and precision. When learning how to adjust a scope, just follow these steps and mix in a bit of personal feeling based on your weapon.

1

Getting Set Up

Make sure you have the necessary tools to adjust your scope. Ensure the scope is properly fixed to the barrel, and that you have a trusted rest in place. Equally important is identifying the ammo you’ll use. The ammo that you adjust the scope with should be the same ammo you’re using in the field. Here are the first steps:

  • Move the crosshairs. Based on the shooter’s ability to the bore, you’ll want to move the crosshairs so that they are in line with where he or she is at.
  • Zero the rifle at short distance. The first real step here is to align the barrel and scope. If you know your rifle, doing this is by bore sighting is doable. Place your rifle in a firm rest, and make sure the action is open. Set up a target that isn’t too far out (less than thirty yards) and preferable with some sort of a central mark or perfect shot marker on it. This allows you to align the barrel of your gun with the mark.
  • Note the erector tube. You don’t want the target image to appear upside down when viewed through the scope. This is the purpose of the erector tube. It will contain multiple lenses that adjust the image back and forth within the scope, ultimately presenting it as is. Don’t tighten the rings too much or else the erector tube won’t be as mobile inside the scope as it should be.
2

Fire Some Test Shots

This is how you’ll test your bore sighting skills. How close was the shot? Don’t worry if it was not even close, especially if this is your first time adjusting the scope on this gun. Make small movements to the scope to get that zero dialed in. Remember that a zero at 25 yards typically goes high at 100 yards, so if 100 yards is the target distance, adjust the scope to be about one inch lower than the zero at 25 yards.

  • Make small tweaks as necessary. If you’ve got the scope adjusted perfectly after less than five shots, you must know your rifle pretty well. When I’m working a new gun, I typically allow up to ten shots just so I can get a feel for the give and take.
  • Take windage into consideration. Are you shooting at a range, or out in the field? If out in the field, how well do you know the area, and more specifically, how your gun shoots in that climate?
  • Check the mounting. If you have continued problems getting the scope to zero and/or to a point of comfortability, it may be a result of sloppy mounting. I’ve had to take off and re-mount the scope on new rifles more than once, which taught me real quick that no two guns are exactly the same. Keep this in mind, and if you remember, double check the mounting before firing test shots.
3

Use Modern Guns And Scopes

This sounds like a picky thing to say, but as I said above, I grew up adjusting really old scopes and rifles. Today’s technology is so much better than what I grew up on, there isn’t any reason to not use the latest stuff available. Unless, of course, you’re a historian or antique gun fanatic! The scopes on modern guns have two adjustable knobs that make the process both easy and fun.

Variable scopes allow for less adjustment than fixed-power scopes, as a result of an extra cam tube. Referring to the erector tube, don’t force down on the variable scope at all while adjusting for risk of restricting it’s functions. If you have an Ar10, so you can find the best scope for ar 10 to have the good shoot

Conclusion

From there, it’s all step and repeat. With each new scope, I recommend repeating this process to make sure that the scope is a) mounted correctly, and b) zeroed correctly. Just like guns, scopes are all different. Gradually move your testing target further away as you get more comfortable with the scope. Because this is so important, I ask that all readers who enjoyed this article take a moment to share it on social media or with family and friends that are avid shooters. I’m all ears for tips that you’ve found for specific scopes, so feel free to leave a comment.

 

 

How To Sharpen A Broadhead

When it comes to bagging a deer, having a sharp broadhead is just as important as mastering the art of long range archery. Without a good blood trail, locating your kill or wounded deer can prove to be quite difficult. A sharp broadhead will puncture the flesh and skin more directly and completely then a dull one, causing more blood and faster bleed out. It’s very similar to any type of sharp knife – the sharper the blade, the harder the bleeding. Here are the best practices for how to sharpen a broadhead.

Identify which type of broadhead you are using and assemble the tools

A fact that many new archers don’t realize is that most broadheads require at least a small bit of sharpening to reach optimum performance. If you’ve bought the kind that are manufactured specifically to be incredibly sharp and not need sharpening, you’re off the hook for now.

I’d venture to say that a vast majority of broadheads will need at least a quick tune up before being ready to hit the field.

I recommend using broadhead arrows when hunting because they penetrate much better than other arrow types, and are also more accurate. Now that we’ve identified the broadhead type, let’s make sure that all necessary tools are on-hand:

  • Broadhead sharpener. These can be picked up at a hunting store or online. It’s worth it to buy a decent one for the garage if you plan to bowhunt regularly. Small, cheaper ones are also available for use on the go if that’s more your style.
  • Sharpening stone. If you don’t have a specified broadhead sharpener, a sharpening stone can get the job done. You’ll have to exercise more control and precision here. Obviously, you don’t want to cut yourself.

Sharpening with a broadhead sharpener

I keep a dedicated sharpener at home, as I don’t really like to do it on the fly or use equipment that isn’t meant for the task. The first step, before any sharpening takes place, is to install the broadhead onto the arrow to make sure it fits properly. Once you’ve got the head onto the arrow, we’re ready to use the sharpener. This tool allows users to hold the arrow by the end near the broadhead. You’ll want to get a secure grip on it using both hands.

  • Place the arrow in the center of the two plates at the top of the sharpener. The broadhead should be on top of the plates.
  • Sharpen the head by running it along the plates, much like you would a kitchen knife on one of those automatic sharpeners. It’s important not to counteract your sharpening by going back the other way.
  • Run it along from the back of the broadhead in towards the tip. This always seems to give more control over the action, in addition to optimizing the sharpening process.
  • Check the head for sharpness by lightly rubbing your finger along it at a perpendicular angle. Again, keep in mind that this is similar to a sharp kitchen knife- if you scrape too hard or the wrong way, you’re going to cut your finger open. I’m not going to sit here and tell you precisely when the head is ready. When it’s sharp enough, you’ll know.
  • If you are using top of the line arrowheads, I highly encourage you to use a dedicated sharpener. This will improve the life of the arrowheads, maintain accuracy, and ensure the best job of sharpening is done.

Sharpening using a whetstone or other file

If you aren’t keen on spening some cash on a nice sharpener, a whetstone will do the trick. Just file the headstone as you would anything else on the whetstone. 3 pronged broadheads are tough to do on a surface like this, but other than that you shouldn’t have any problems.

I don’t recommend doing this with top-notch broadheads, for risk of damaging them and having to spend a bunch of money replacing them. But if you’re out in the field or on a camping trip, having a portable way to sharpen the heads is typically better than nothing.

A bastard file is my favorite of these. Approach it like you’re using a dedicated sharpener, with the broadhead attached to the arrow, and file like you would anything else on there. Again, pretty tough with three pronged heads, but you get the gist. You can take the bastard file anywhere: keep in your pocket or in your satchel.

Conclusion

Broadheads can be sharpened in a number of ways. Ever since I was a kid, I’ve been taking the extra time to keep the heads sharp and clean. Accuracy is your best friend when out in the field, and leaving a solid trail of blood to track down the animal is going to make the entire process easier. I hope you’ve enjoyed this article on how to sharpen a broadhead. Please share on social media so that your friends and family can learn the benefits, and feel free to leave a comment. I’d love to get a discussion going.

How To Attract Deer To Your Yard

Some of us are fortunate enough to live the dream, with a nice open piece of property behind our home. Perfect for fishing, backyard camping, and of course, observing nature. For the latter, you’ll need to know how to attract deer to your yard. I live in a house that backs up to a vast landscape of hunt-able land. Over my twenty years here, I’ve mastered several techniques that draw deer in and keep them around. The best part is that once a few deer come in, more always follow. Let’s take a look at my 5 techniques.

1. Increase the amount of shrubbery in your yard

This is key, as deer are constantly grazing. The more natural in appearance the plant life, the more deer will be attracted to it. Having shrubbery native to your area is equally as effective. For how to attract deer to your yard regularly, follow these tips:

  • Tall shrubs work the best in attracting deer to your yard. Taller plants can spread their seed further, which encourages additional growth as well as brings in wildlife that pick up on the smell.
  • The more unkempt the shrubbery, the more natural it will appear to the deer. This will pique their interest more than perfectly planted lines of bushes and plants.
  • This video shows a particularly effective deer attractant

2.Keep a calm and serene environment

Deer are skittish animals. They spook easily, and certainly won’t hesitate to bolt if they feel at all threatened. To attract deer to your yard, you’ll want to keep a quiet, peaceful environment. Minimize noise escaping from the home.

Along the same line, don’t have loud birdfeeders or clanging wind chimes hung from the porch. Deer feel comfortable solely in natural settings free from outside distractions.

Reducing the ‘barrier to entry’ helps as well. Deer aren’t going to hop over a tall fence that they can’t see through. Do everything you can to meld your yard in with the natural settings beyond your property.

They also aren’t going to approach bright light, so turn off your porch lights when not in use and don’t have unnecessarily bring or shiny objects sitting around. We’ve all seen how deer act when they are caught in headlights. The initial freezing, followed by a quick escape as soon as they feel threatened.

3.Have water available for the deer

If you’ve got a small pond in your yard like I do, then you’re in luck here. Mine is a natural water source, I don’t even have to feed water into it. The deer love it because it is exactly what they are used to.

If you haven’t got a pond, consider adding a water fixture of some type. Even if it isn’t natural (such as a bath or fresh water pool), you will still find that it attracts deer.  Avoid chlorinated pools, or anything with a bunch of chemicals in it. The point is to offer the deer a place to refresh and have a drink, and they can smell that chlorine a mile away.

  • If you live in an area with a strong winter, keep logs of wood in the water to prevent it from freezing.
  • Replenish the supply consistently so the deer come to trust the water source.

4.Have a large salt lick or other food source

To get deer into your yard, having a large salt lick for them to taste is a great idea. They smell it, which brings them in from afar. Once they’ve tasted it, they will continue coming back for it and may even hang around for a bit. This is particularly true if you have a water feature for them to enjoy – we all know how salt makes us thirsty.

I don’t recommend putting the salt lick on your porch. Deer will be more hesitant to approach if it’s that close to the house. They’ll like it more if it’s out in the yard, maybe on a fence. Or, better yet, right next to the water source.

  • If you can’t get ahold of a salt lick, a mineral block or other block high in sodium will suffice.
  • Keep it away from areas of heavy movement. No dogs, children, or other ornery activity should happen near the salt lick.
  • Corn feeders also work great. I have both a salt lick and a few corn feeders in my back yard. This gives the deer an easy source of food, which gives them (and their pack) ample reason to return again and again.
  • Deer love oak trees. Dotting your property with oaks will attract large numbers of deer. They feed on the twigs and leaves, as well as the acorns found on the tree.

5.Install grasses that deer love

There are a handful of grass types that deer love to graze. A good thing about grasses is that it will attract them from quite a distance and, if you have enough of it, keep them coming back despite the other techniques listed here. If you live in an area where it is possible to use one of these, then go for it:

  • Bluegrass
  • Wheat
  • Fescue
  • Minimize the amount of pesticides and chemicals in the grass, so as not to turn the deer away.

Ferns will also attract deer to your yard. Keep these ferns in shady spots, and do everything you can to help them thrive. The better the ferns, the higher the odds the deer will be attracted to them.

Now you have a basic understanding of how to attract deer to your yard. Hopefully, you live in an area surrounded by wildlife already – your chances of attracting deer are very high if you follow these steps. If you have any tips or techniques that you’d like to share, please leave them in the comments here so we can get a discussion going. If you found this article helpful, feel free to share on social media. Keeping deer around the yard is relaxing and surprisingly not that hard to do, it just takes some persistence!

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