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How To Move A Gun Safe. Best Way You Need To Know

It’s that dreaded moment. The time when you have to move a gun safe from one place to another. Gun safes are notoriously heavy and difficult to move, much like that furniture you inherited from Grandma. Everything about the process basically sucks, but it is doable. Follow this simple series of steps on how to move a gun safe and you’ll have that thing in its new location in no time.

How to move a gun safe

How to move a gun safe

Initial steps

Get the safe as light as possible by removing anything that doesn’t need to be inside. Ammo, anything else that can be put in a separate box for now, should be taken out. If moving to a new house, park the moving truck with the rear facing either the sidewalk or driveway that you will be approaching from. Lower the ramp and be sure the path to get to the truck is made as easy as possible.

For larger safes, provide the team with worker gloves if they don’t already have some. I also find it helpful to provide pizza and beer to those that help me move – it seems to get everyone in a better mood and creates a team atmosphere. Here is a great video.

  • Cover walls, door openings, other furniture, and important items with scratch resistant material. Anything that the safe will pass by in the home should be protected.
  • Clear the path with which the safe will travel to an extra foot on each side, wherever possible. A bit of wobbling and curving will likely occur during transport. You don’t want anything to be struck by the safe should it or your team become frenzied.
  • Get a plank of wood or other solid object to act as a ramp if there are any steps leading from the front door to the vehicle or other area where the safe will be. If this doesn’t seem doable, you’ll need a couple extra people on the lower side as you move the safe down the step.

Moving larger gun safes (over 3 feet tall, too heavy for one person to lift)

Gun safes are heavy in order to make them near impossible to steal should someone intrude into your home. Moving them about is intentionally a process. I moved my 800-pound gun safe from our old house in Naples, Florida to our new spot in Lyndon, Washington and learned the hard way that gun safes aren’t the most transportable of items. We spent an extra grand on gas on the drive because of the added weight. However, I picked up these tips:

  • Get a furniture dolly, or a forklift if you can. I recommend buying one from a home improvement store instead of renting or borrowing one. That way, you’ll have it whenever you need it.
  • When you’re ready to move, have a team of people stand on one side of the safe and lean it back. Slide the dolly underneath the safe and stabilize.
    • I’ll note here that it is super important that the safe be balanced well on the dolly. Due to immense weight, it can fall over and crush individuals if not properly set. Here is a video on the process.
  • Ensure your path is cleared, and begin slowly moving the best gun safe out of the room.

Corners and Immoveable Objects in the way

Going around corners can be tough. The most important thing is to remain calm and proceed slowly. If you can, have a person position themselves on the far side of the safe (the side opposing the direction you are turning into) to provide added support from the back side. This person can forcefully push into the rear as the safe is moved around the corner. Go wide – by this I mean swing the dolly a bit further out than you initially think is necessary. That will allow the safe and dolly to be turned at an easier angle without striking the wall or toppling onto the person guarding the rear.

Loading into moving trucks/vehicles

Ready to exert some strength? Good, because this is the time to show off how those gym sessions have sculpted your muscles.

  • Assemble the entire team (add a few extra people if you can) at the bottom of the ramp leading into the back of the truck.
  • Everyone will need to position themselves comfortable behind the safe. If you have any truck straps, this is a great time to tie them around the safe and have one person stand in front of the safe and pull while everyone else pushes. While pulling won’t be super effective, the main benefit here is that this person acts as a sort of guide to ensure the safe doesn’t derail or fall off the dolly.
  • Once you start pushing the safe up the ramp, DON’T STOP! Momentum is the most important factor here. Get those grunts out and keep pushing. By the time you reach the top of the ladder, you will have enough momentum to easily move the gun safe into the desired position inside the truck.

Moving smaller gun safes

With smaller ones, the process of how to move a gun safe is basically the same buy slightly less intense. Follow the above steps and make adjustments where necessary – you won’t need as many people or as much strength. If the safe can be carried, be sure to have at least two people for added support. Set the safe down gently and be mindful of doorways, walls, and protruding objects when passing through hallways. Do not set the safe on top of anything else – it’s weight may crush other objects.

Conclusion

best gun safe

This is one of the best gun safe

Now you know how to move a gun safe. The process is tough but can be enjoyable with friends and a good attitude. One thing to keep in mind is that when moving the gun safe to a new house, identify in advance the best location for the safe. In the garage or a room where it will not need to be moved ever again. If you enjoyed this article, please share. Knowledge is power, just like teamwork! If you have any tips or anything, feel free to leave them in the comments and we’ll get a discussion going. Check out my recent post about best ar10 scope

Which Is Better Between .260 Remington And 6.5 Creedmoor?

Do similar rounds produce similar results? Any experienced shooter will tell you that that is not always the case. For direct proof, look no further than the .260 Remington vs 6.5 Creedmoor. Both of these are a perfect match for the .308 Winchester rifle. In many cases, if you weren’t the one who loaded the rounds, you may not be able to even tell a difference.

My personal experience has led me to prefer the .260 Remington over the 6.5 Creedmoor. We’ll get into why in this article. I’m old school, is the main reason. This guy pretty much sums up my thoughts on the .260 Remington in this video:

The old classic vs. the new hotshot

.260 Remington is a classic among long-time riflemen, having been the backbone of what we’ve used for such a long time. The reason for this is that seasoned hunters have expertise in reloading. .260 Remington rounds necessitate this, while 6.5 Creedmoor rounds are better for those without that reloading expertise.

As many new hunters aren’t trained in the art of the reload, Creedmoor can significantly reduce the learning curve when looking to get out into the field. Additionally, the Creedmoor has a shoulder angle that is sharper than the Remington. This comes with less body taper

Additionally, less water is held by the Creedmoor. This won’t affect certain shooters, but it’s worth noting. It can fit a longer bullet because of this, but the general use of handheld cartridges has all but eliminated any benefit there. Here, a video description of the two takes place.

High performance vs. low performance, and vice versa

The brass on the .260 Remington is of a higher quality than the 6.5 Creedmoor. With the Creedmoor, you may find that the brass isn’t as long lasting. This affects hunters as they experience less overall durability and flow with their shooting than if they were to use the .260 Remington.

The Creedmoor’s case is a bit shorter than the .260 Remington’s. The Remington is undoubtedly faster as a result of the higher case capacity, necessitating less maintenance in the field. Remingtons are better for those looking to use a bolt gun, but for the semi-automatic inclined, the 6.5 Creedmoor is the better choice. I’m always using bolt, so the Remington works for me.

When it comes to distance shooting, the Remington will be solid up to at least 800-900 yards.

Personal preference and skill level are a big factor

Beyond that, the accuracy can lose a bit of its dependability depending on skill and build. I’ve got mine accurate up to 1000, but I’ve been doing this for a long time. I will concede that the Creedmoor can perfectly nail a target from 1000 yards when built the right way and taken good care of. If everything is prepped correctly, that is the better option for really long distances.

I recommend keeping a chart of data from the rounds you fire with both. Test them out, and through your charts you can identify which one you are more accurate with, and which one makes the overall process easier for you. Keep track of powder, distance, velocity, and muzzle energy. I also encourage testing at different distances. Keep a record of 100 yard accuracy percentage compared with longer shots. Those who are new to long distance shooting should stick with the choice that they are the most comfortable with.

I also encourage shoots to watch some videos online of different practices with both options. Here are a couple great options:

  • Creedmore footage

  • Remington footage

 

Conclusion

At the end of the day, it really depends on personal preference. Take into consideration which bullets you plan to shoot, and whether or not you are willing to switch them to accommodate aesthetics or if you are hard lined on performance and personal comfort. I’ve grown so accustomed to the .260 Remington over the decades that I’m not going to be switching anything up at this point.

If you enjoyed this article, please share on social media – us gun freaks always love a good debate on equipment. Feel free to share your personal opinions in the comment section here, as I’m sure we’ve got a community of 6.5 Creedmoor users out there that have thoughts on the matter.

What Are The Best Scope For Ruger 10/22?

Perhaps the best part of using a rifle like the Ruger 10/22 is its sheer popularity among American shooters. The gun is very popular, and because of this, there are a variety of scopes and mod options that have become popular as well.

I’ve been using a Ruger since my Dad first took me out hunting as a kid, and have become very familiar with the different scope options available. Today, we’ll take a look at three options that are the best scope for a Ruger 10/22 and why they stand apart from others.

Top Our Pick For Best Scopes For Ruger 10/22 In 2017

Top 3 Best Scopes For AR 10 On The Market

This is my review about 3 scope for ruger 10/22 on the market, it will help you find the best for hunting. Check out it:

1. TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm 30/30 Reticle .22 Riflescope (Matte Finish)

TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm better scope for the Ruger 10/22

TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm 30/30 Reticle .22 Riflescope (Matte Finish)

The TascoRimfire Series is top of the line, all the way. In its price class, you won’t find a better scope for the Ruger 10/22. The HD vision is superb. It really hones in on far-away targets and holds the view long enough to pull the trigger and get a good shot. I’m a fan because of these features:

  • The ruger 10/22 optics are fully coated. I’ve never had any sight problems with this scope, even after using it in multiple lighting scenarios and times of day.

  • The 50-yard parallax setting is standard and functional. Experienced shooters will find lines of sight to be as expected based on distance, terrain, and weather

  • The accuracy is spot on. Take it to the range once before heading out on a hunt and you’ll be completely comfortable with it.

One thing I always suggest with this scope is to purchase a separate weaver rail to go along with it. You can get one that is of much higher quality, and will last longer, than the one that Tasco makes. Also, buy additional scope rings if you don’t have any on hand. They will be necessary for proper and secure mounting.

Another hint is to make sure everything is properly mounted and fastened, so that the reticle doesn’t move. If you’re using this scope regularly, check the security of the mounting each time you head out.Be sure to test it at both close up and further away shooting distances to get comfortable before forming your final opinion on the scope. I found that it took a couple different scenarios before I fully grasped what it has to offer.

2. Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

When looking to step up the scope game significantly, this scope from Nikon is the perfect piece of equipment.

Open circle aiming points are very accurate from 50 to 150 yards (I’ve actually used it for shots that I estimated were up to 200, but not with the accuracy of under 150).

The crosshair is right in the line of vision and never blurry or faded, something that is frequently a problem with cheaper scopes.

  • The Nikon Eco-Glass lenses are arsenic-free. They also are incredibly vibrant when in front of the eye – I’ve never had any issues with reflection or fog

  • Zero reset is required on elevation and windage. After you’ve zeroed the scope, there shouldn’t be any adjustments necessary to keep it accurate unless the mounting is altered. Move a click up, and it can be easily reset
  • Nikon has perfectly engineered this scope for .22 ammunition, and there is no better weapon for .22 than the Ruger 10/22. It is the perfect combination.

Make sure your on-hand mounts are made for the Ruger 10/22 – special order them if not. Mounting and zero issues may result from mounts that are not for this specific rifle. Other than that, this is a solid scope and worth the spend. I’ve bought a few of them for different .22s and always have been satisfied. If you’re looking to impress with a great gift, this is the best option available.This is a good scope for ruger 10/22

3. Simmons 511039 3 - 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

Simmons 511039 3 - 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

Simmons 511039 3 – 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

The Simmons Riflescope is built with optical glass lenses that, in my experience, are incredibly functional. For an economical .22 scope such as this one, that feature really stands out. Their HydroShield lens coating that they brag about is optimized as well. Two of the three scopes we’re talking about today are far from the high-end market, proving that Ruger 10/22 scopes don’t have to break the bank.

The eyepiece is bright and vibrant, allowing for easy target sighting and zero fatigue when following a target or working to find the best shot location on the target. The clarity cannot be beat.

Here are the best features:

  • The mounting rings that come with the Simmons Riflescope are not well-suited to the Ruger 10/22. As typical, I suggest buying additional rings and weaver rail. It can be mounted.

  • The rubber surface is easy to adjust, even in rain, heat, or damp conditions. Once zeroed, the scope is as accurate as anything on the market.

  • It mounts to other options, but seems to be specifically designed for the Ruger 10/22 due to its popularity.

Above all other scopes, this one gives the most bang for the buck. In the hunting world, that goes a long way because it allows more flexibility for other add-ons and modifications.

Conclusion

There are a variety of best scopes on the market for a Ruger 10/22. These three are all well-suited for action, whether that be the range or out in the hunting field. The trendiness of rimfire shooting has led to the development of a lot of new scopes, but I always stand by the old classics. For mounting help, check out this great video.:

If you will reference this article in your upcoming scope purchase, we’d love it if you shared what you found helpful via social media. That way, others can learn more about the scopes as well. I’d love to hear which one you ended up going with. Feel free to leave a comment here with thoughts and we’ll get a conversation going.

How To Use The Binoculars In The Right Way

Binoculars are the perfect addition for just about any outdoor activity. Hunting, fishing, bird watching, you name it. Binoculars improve visibility and help the user specifically focus on their target. If taking a shot or observing an animal from afar, they improve accuracy over a long range. Here are the best practices for how to use binoculars.

Set up the binoculars for optimal use

  • Adjust the distance between the two eye barrels to be appropriate for your face. Binoculars will stretch or pull tighter and hold that position for use. If the binoculars aren’t property set to you, you will see black edges in the peripherals.
  • Use the neck strap. You don’t want to set the binoculars down and forget them or risk having the settings compromised. By strapping them around your neck, you can relax the set when not in use while still having it ready to go very quickly.
  • Preferably, purchase a pair of binoculars with a diopter. This allows the user to focus both eye pieces at the same time, as opposed to having to do the process twice and risk them not being set equally. This can cause blur or otherwise be distracting.
  • This video walks users through setting their binoculars.

Identify your target and focus

Before zooming in, figure out exactly what it is that you’re going to look at. To get set, pick a solid object up against a solid color. A building, tree, or tall plant set against a cloudless sky is perfect.

  • Turn the diopter or central focus wheel until the object is perfectly in focus. Be sure that both eyes are set and feel comfortable. If you’ve gone too far in, zoom back out. I always recommend testing a few settings, even after you’ve found one that feels great. That way, you are confident the setting used is the best one.
  • For fine focusing, close the right eye. Using only the left, adjust the diopter to the specific setting that feels perfectly in view. Be sure the object you are focusing on is in clear, fine focus.
  • If your eyes are strained or fatigued, re-adjust. There’s nothing wrong with using more than one focus setting throughout the day.

Clean the binoculars

After use, you’ll want to clean the binoculars for next time. This helps keep the set optimized for long term use. You’ll notice that dirty lenses make it incredibly hard to find the perfect zoom and focal points. This can lead to headaches and fatigue. When cleaning, be careful not to scratch the lenses!

  • Using an eyeglass brush or cloth, wipe away any dirt or particles that have collected on the outside of the lends.
  • Use eyeglass solution to really get those lenses shining.
  • Look through the binoculars to ensure there are no smudges or streaks on the lenses.
  • Return the binoculars to their case and store them in a place that won’t get to hot or cold.
  • Here is a great video on cleaning binoculars.

In recent years, I’ve been using binoculars more and more to hone in my hunting and bird watching. A good pair really ups the visibility, and improves accuracy with long range shooting. Now that you’ve discovered the joy of using binoculars, please share this article on social media so that those closest to you can do the same! I love hearing about new tricks of the trade and activities, so feel free to comment as well.

How To Adjust A Scope? The Important Thing You Need To Know

The scopes on today’s rifles adjust to point-of-impact specifications. A huge plus for hunters and shooters, accuracy in long distance shooting is greatly improved. The scope has knobs on the top and bottom, both of which have significant impact on the zeroing in your shot. Old timers like me learned to adjust a scope back on Civil War-era weapons. Nowadays, it is much easier, but still takes practice and precision. When learning how to adjust a scope, just follow these steps and mix in a bit of personal feeling based on your weapon.

1

Getting Set Up

Make sure you have the necessary tools to adjust your scope. Ensure the scope is properly fixed to the barrel, and that you have a trusted rest in place. Equally important is identifying the ammo you’ll use. The ammo that you adjust the scope with should be the same ammo you’re using in the field. Here are the first steps:

  • Move the crosshairs. Based on the shooter’s ability to the bore, you’ll want to move the crosshairs so that they are in line with where he or she is at.
  • Zero the rifle at short distance. The first real step here is to align the barrel and scope. If you know your rifle, doing this is by bore sighting is doable. Place your rifle in a firm rest, and make sure the action is open. Set up a target that isn’t too far out (less than thirty yards) and preferable with some sort of a central mark or perfect shot marker on it. This allows you to align the barrel of your gun with the mark.
  • Note the erector tube. You don’t want the target image to appear upside down when viewed through the scope. This is the purpose of the erector tube. It will contain multiple lenses that adjust the image back and forth within the scope, ultimately presenting it as is. Don’t tighten the rings too much or else the erector tube won’t be as mobile inside the scope as it should be.
2

Fire Some Test Shots

This is how you’ll test your bore sighting skills. How close was the shot? Don’t worry if it was not even close, especially if this is your first time adjusting the scope on this gun. Make small movements to the scope to get that zero dialed in. Remember that a zero at 25 yards typically goes high at 100 yards, so if 100 yards is the target distance, adjust the scope to be about one inch lower than the zero at 25 yards.

  • Make small tweaks as necessary. If you’ve got the scope adjusted perfectly after less than five shots, you must know your rifle pretty well. When I’m working a new gun, I typically allow up to ten shots just so I can get a feel for the give and take.
  • Take windage into consideration. Are you shooting at a range, or out in the field? If out in the field, how well do you know the area, and more specifically, how your gun shoots in that climate?
  • Check the mounting. If you have continued problems getting the scope to zero and/or to a point of comfortability, it may be a result of sloppy mounting. I’ve had to take off and re-mount the scope on new rifles more than once, which taught me real quick that no two guns are exactly the same. Keep this in mind, and if you remember, double check the mounting before firing test shots.
3

Use Modern Guns And Scopes

This sounds like a picky thing to say, but as I said above, I grew up adjusting really old scopes and rifles. Today’s technology is so much better than what I grew up on, there isn’t any reason to not use the latest stuff available. Unless, of course, you’re a historian or antique gun fanatic! The scopes on modern guns have two adjustable knobs that make the process both easy and fun.

Variable scopes allow for less adjustment than fixed-power scopes, as a result of an extra cam tube. Referring to the erector tube, don’t force down on the variable scope at all while adjusting for risk of restricting it’s functions. If you have an Ar10, so you can find the best scope for ar 10 to have the good shoot

Conclusion

From there, it’s all step and repeat. With each new scope, I recommend repeating this process to make sure that the scope is a) mounted correctly, and b) zeroed correctly. Just like guns, scopes are all different. Gradually move your testing target further away as you get more comfortable with the scope. Because this is so important, I ask that all readers who enjoyed this article take a moment to share it on social media or with family and friends that are avid shooters. I’m all ears for tips that you’ve found for specific scopes, so feel free to leave a comment.

 

 

Which Shotgun Choke Is The Most Open?

Which shotgun choke is the most open? For those of us in the firearms community, the term ‘pattern’ is something that arises frequently. This refers to the column of round shot pellets leaving the barrel of the gun. As they move further away, they begin to spread out. Towards the end of the shotgun’s range, targets will be missed by the pellets as they spread further apart.

The shotgun choke is the response of gun designers in their attempt to combat this effect. Choking means that the bore is restricted, which will keep the pattern closer together for longer distances.

Which shotgun choke is the most open?

The most open shotgun choke is called a ‘cylinder.’ The easiest way for you to analyze this is to look at the muzzle end of the barrel. You’ll notice that with cylinder chokes, there actually isn’t any constriction at all. The diameter of the choke is the same as the inside of the shotgun barrel. There is the lowest amount of bore reduction.

Restriction is essentially non-existent here, which causes the pattern to spread out much more so than with higher restriction chokes.

The tightest kind of shotgun chokes are called ‘extra tights.’ These are basically the opposite of a cylinder choke. Restriction of the pattern’s spread is maximized, for increased long-range target accuracy.

For larger game, tighter chokes can help with targets on the move and further away. But for me, it’s been many years since I’ve used a tight choke. I don’t do much other than duck hunting anymore. I’ve got a buddy who is a diehard fan of turkey hunting, and he prefers to use a tight choke. Here is a great video explaining shotgun chokes with visuals.

Why do I want to use a looser choke?

The biggest advantage to using a looser choke is seen particularly by duck hunters. With waterfowl, a super tight choke can have two effects when using steel pellets (lead pellets were outlawed by the federal government for waterfowl hunting in the nineties):

  • Potential damage to the barrel. Steel can damage the barrel because it isn’t as malleable as lead. It doesn’t cooperate as well with tight chokes.
  • It can harm the meat on the animal. Obviously, if you’re hunting for food, you don’t want the meat to be tarnished by the shot.
  • I really like the way these guys explained why they use certain chokes on duck hunts.:

So, to prevent these two things from happening, waterfowl hunters began using more open chokes. Hence, the rising popularity of the cyclinder.

I first began to prefer an open choke shortly after the regulations took place in 1991. By the following season, I began noticing severe distress to the barrel of my shotfun. This began to have a great impact on my hunting, so I started using the cyclinder choke.

Ever since, I’ve been working on ways to maximize my shooting accuracy with the most open choke, and have gotten a lot better. It takes an immense amount of practice, but at the end of the day I have better meat resulting from my increased shooting skill level. All without damaging the barrel of my gun.

The bottom line

When selecting the best choke for your shotgun, the most important factor is to consider what type of game you are hunting. For turkeys and larger game birds, a tighter choke is going to be the better option.

For those of us duck hunters, the cyclinder is the most open shotgun choke and therefore the best for us. I always recommend heading to the range and spending ample time on the patterning board prior to hitting the field. Notice how the pellets strike the target, and adjust your shooting technique as necessary.

Many new hunters don’t realize the advantages of using an open choke on their shotgun when waterfowl hunting. I’d appreciate it if you shared this article on social media so that more new hunters can learn of the pros and cons of different chokes. Do you have any techniques you’d like to share? Go ahead and leave them here in the comments, and we’ll get a discussion going.

What Is The First Step In Cleaning A Firearm?

Perhaps your firearm has been on a good adventure with you, or maybe you just bought it and want to make sure it is ready for the field. So what is the first step in cleaning a firearm? You’ll want to make sure the process is done correctly so as not to damage the weapon or cause rust. It took me several cleaning processes before I really felt comfortable with cleaning my firearm. Today, I’ll show you my process and the best practices for keeping that gun clean.

Buy a cleaning kit.

These can be pretty simple. You’ll want to make sure that you have these items:

  • Bore brush
  • Oil
  • Rag
  • Cotton swabs
  • Ample lighting in the leaning area
  • Patch holder with patches

Have a good commercial solvent

Basically, a solvent is a substance that has the ability to dissolve something else. This is incredibly important when cleaning a firearm. Unlike washing dishes or cleaning most other things, a simple rub down with some soap isn’t going to cut it here.

  • Use a garage or other area with open doors/windows to keep fresh air flowing in.
  • Clean all metal parts of the firearm thoroughly with the commercial solvent. Make sure the barrel is getting a good clean as well.
  • Clean the bore up through the breech end, wherever possible. Spend ample time here making sure that the bore is as clean as the barrel and rest of the metal parts on the weapon.
  • Run the dry patch through to double check for cleanliness. Let the area dry before proceeding.

Stick an oily patch into the barrel

The goal here is to get it nice and lubed up. Apply a liberal dose of oil onto the patch and slide it back and forth in the barrel of the gun, ensuring the entire area is reached. Any parts of the gun that are metal should receive a light coating of oil. Here is a great video on how to clean a firearm. It should go without saying, but always make sure your gun is unloaded before starting this process:

Store the firearm in a horizontal position

This will help it dry and keep the oil on all parts that need it. If storing firearm horizontally is a challenge, face the muzzle down so that any run-age will come out of the barrel instead of clogging the back end. If you have a gun rack, I always suggest designating a specific place for firearms that have just been cleaned. The best gun safe is my recommend

  • Do not leave the weapon laying on its side on a table or counter.
  • Do not store vertically with the butt of the gun facing down.

Prior to firing the gun, run a clean patch through the barrel

This removes any excess oil or dirt. It makes sure that everything will go smoothly when firing, and that there aren’t any clogs or backlogs within the barrel. Here are a few tips I have for streamlining your firearm cleaning process:

  • Keep oil on hand at all times. Have it designated as only for cleaning your firearms, that way you won’t use it for anything else. Storing it in the gun safe or in the same general area as your guns will make sure that you always know where it is, and no one else is using it for other purposes.
  • Get into the habit of cleaning your firearms regularly. When starting the first step in cleaning a firearm, always follow the same procedure. There shouldn’t be any variations when cleaning the same gun. Consistency is key!
  • Dedicate a rag for the task. Always keep it on hand with the oil.

There you have it. If someone asks you what is the first step in cleaning a firearm, you can point them to this article. I hope you found this informative. If so, we’d appreciate it if you shared on social media. If you have any tips for cleaning a firearm that we didn’t mention here, feel free to leave a comment. Let’s get a discussion going.

When Do Bowsights Work Best?

Bow hunting is a whole different animal from other forms of the sport. I was attracted to it immediately, the second I held my dad’s bow in my hands for the first time. It’s so real – I’ve always felt a deeper connection to the land when I’m not hunting with an expensive rifle. The problem is, it can be hard to aim accurately with a bow in certain situations. The scope on a gun has all but eliminated sight problems, and bow sights aim to do that with bows. But when do bow sights work best?

1.When you’re not on level ground.

This is when I’ve found bow sights to work the best. They give you the ability to line up the appropriate sight pin on your target. As opposed to a bullet, which enters the body having the same impact as the bullet is rounded, bows are pointed. For maximum impact, you want the arrow to be as close to level and straight up-and-down as you can. When on slanted earth, this can be very tricky. Use a bow sight to:

  • Know the approximate degree/angle that you’re shooting from, so that you can correct as necessary.
  • See whether your target is on any type of slope. Also, whether or not the target is moving in a tilted manner or otherwise performing an action that might throw off the equilibrium of your shot.
  • Go even further by precisely aiming for the right spot on the target, despite any slope in your position or the target’s position.
  • These factors can eliminate the need for you to reposition yourself, which is particularly useful if you are in an area very dense with plants or other rustling, loud objects such as fallen leaves.

2.Ensuring that your bow is held in the right place.

When do bow sights work best for actual handling of your bow? Pretty much all the time, because they allow you to know immediately if you’re at an odd angle with the target. If you are shooting over multiple ridge lines, downslope, or upslope, bow sights work to better your odds of properly handling your bow for the situation.

  • Even for beginning hunters, bow sights help with handling because they make it very obvious if you aren’t holding your bow the right way.
  • Bow sights help the shooter identify and utilize the correct anchor point.
  • They help immensely with aiming, as well as steadying the bow for an accurate shot.
  • They make it obvious if you are shaking or jolting the bow around to the point where your shot will be directly impacted. Here is a video on a 3-pin hunting bow sight.:

3.When you have the perfect fit for your hunting style.

Do you prefer a fixed pin bow sight or a single pin moveable slider? After trying out the two and identifying your favorite, you will be a lot more comfortable using your bow out in the field that you were without a bow. Personally, I’m all for the fixed pin, because I’m used to its aiming and positioning now so I can properly place myself for each shot. I use the second and third pins most of the time. Here are some situations where one is better than the other, however:

  • Single pin is better when you aren’t quite as sure about your distance from the target. You can adjust it a little higher if the target is further away than originally thought.
  • Fixed pin is much better for short-distance shooting. After some practice, you’ll know almost instantly which pin to use based on how far away the target is. This article explains some times when you should and shouldn’t use a bow sight.
  • Both can be useful when shooting over uneven terrain. Take an extra moment (if you can) to get the perfect placement on the pin so that you’re not focusing on anything on the ground.

4. When you have an estimated distance between yourself and the target.

Speaking of short and long distance shooting, when do bow sights work best all of the time? When you’re confident about how far away the beast is from you. Bow sights are impeccable for aiming help when you’re in a blind spot and have been tracking the animal for a bit.

They are also great if you’re in other hidden areas, such as up in a tree or shooting from a risen platform. The entire point of a bow sight is to increase your accuracy on a calculated distance, so the more familiar you are with your shooting location, the more you’ll be able to lean on your bow sight for that perfect shot.

  • When starting out with bow hunting, do some practice without a bow sight until you have some basic skill at gauging distance. Then try using a bow sight and see how much easier it makes everything.
  • For blind spots, I always recommend using a bow sight. Particularly when large branches, water, or other hazards are between you and the target.
  • When hunting big game like deer and elk, bow sights are incredible because they help you zero in on the specific part of the animal that you’re intending to hit.
  • On the other hand, with smaller game, bow sights aren’t as necessary unless you’re needing assistance getting the shot line up.

Conclusion

The basic gist of when do bow sights work best is basically a combination of the distance and the difficulty of the shot. If you know how far away the animal is, use a bow sight! If you aren’t sure or are still trying to get a hold on distance acquisition, try some shooting without one. I’d urge you to always have bow sight skills in your bag of tricks, in case the opportunity calls. Better to be safe than sorry!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this guide and know when to use a bow sight. Please feel free to leave a comment and chime in on the discussion, and as always, give this article a share on social media so as to increase hunter awareness- always a good thing.

What Are The Best Scope For AR 10 Rifle?

What are the best scopes for an AR-10 rifle? There are so many options these days, and certainly the discussions have flown back and forth as to who does it best.

Personally, my uncle got me into Nikon scopes as a kid and I’ve always preferred them, but over the last five years I’ve come across a few others that I think are worth mentioning.

Through demoing numerous scopes at ranges, talking extensively with hunters, and incorporating my personal situation and preferences, I’ve compiled here the four best scopes for an AR-10. All of these are worth considering, and I think that through applying your personal preferences you’ll find one here that meets your needs.

Top Our Pick For Best Scopes For Ar 10 In 2017

Top 3 Best Scopes For AR 10 On The Market

This is my review about 4 scope for ar 10 on the market, it will help you find the best for hunting. Check out it:

1. Nikon M-308 SF 4-16x42mm Riflescope w/ Nikoplex Reticle, Black - 16462

Nikon M-308 SF 4-16x42mm Riflescope w/ Nikoplex Reticle, Black - 16462

Nikon M-308 SF 4-16x42mm Riflescope w/ Nikoplex Reticle, Black – 16462

The Nikon M-308 is the most accurate medium-priced scope on the market, making it the best scope for the AR-10.

During mounting, you’ll want to remember that the reticle is not illuminated and thus doesn’t provide the accuracy assistance in low light or at night. This is made up for the by stellar distance accuracy and the fact that it is durable with up to a .338 win mag (although it is calibrated for a .308 win mag).

The rapid action turret is graduated in terms of yard markers with a zero reset. I really like this because I’ve been shooting for distance judged on yards instead of meters my whole life. Note that in order to attach this scope to a picanty rail, you’ll need rings. Here are the things I loved most about this scope:

  • I was able to zero it at 100 yards

  • Had no trouble shooting 600 yards, before any noticeable challenge of distance or perception.

  • · The scope helps a lot with brightness issues if you are hunting on a day without much light or in a shaded area. I haven’t found any other scopes that do so much for brightness without having an illuminated reticle. Here are some more notes on this scope.

What to watch out for:

  • The eye relief is the one downside to this scope. It took me a bit to get comfortable and have my eye trained on it before I could maximize target acquisition.

  • The wings are built with thumb screws instead of magnets. While this makes it more durable, it also (at least to me) appears to make it slightly less realistic and modern.

2. Nikon M-308 4-16x42mm Riflescope w/ BDC 800 Reticle,Black

Nikon M-308 4-16x42mm Riflescope w/ BDC 800 Reticle,Black

Nikon M-308 4-16x42mm Riflescope w/ BDC 800 Reticle,Black

The Nikon M-308 is one of the best scopes for an AR 10 because of the quick-focus eyepiece.

Nikon definitely responded to feedback on eyepieces and went the extra mile with this one. The piece is rather versatile, functioning without dependence on barrel length and works on any .308 platform.

I really loved the image quality, especially considering the price point and size of this scope. It’s lightweight, easy to mount, and retains accuracy through several rounds of shooting.

Honestly, I prefer the 16462 honestly, but both are great mounts for the price and eliminate the need to consider mounts priced three to four times higher. Here are the plusses:

  • Clear optics and strong BDC reticle.

  • Great appearance in the water, enough to fool the uncanny hunter who hasn’t seen them before.
  • Bore sighted and great sight picture, up to 1000 yards. Have we mentioned how great the visibility is?

  • It’s very durable and will last many years. Nikon is putting out excellent scopes that are affordable and useful for hunters of all abilities.

The down side:

  • Be sure to inquire as to whether your order includes the M308 mount. Some sellers include this in the purchase, others force you to buy it separately. It’s a much better deal when the mount is included.

3. Vortex Optics Diamondback 4-12x40 Dead-Hold BDC Reticle - 1 Inch Tube (DBK-04-BDC)

Vortex Optics Diamondback 4-12x40 Dead-Hold BDC Reticle - 1 Inch Tube (DBK-04-BDC)

Vortex Optics Diamondback 4-12×40 Dead-Hold BDC Reticle – 1 Inch Tube (DBK-04-BDC)

Vortex rockets itself onto the list of best scopes for an AR-10 with this Diamondback model.

These things are sleek and effective- I first bought one years ago and have since bought this model and love the optics (I am entering my fifties now). The glass is perfectly viewable and takes little to no time to adjust to. The reticle is spot on and extremely life-like.

Here are the best features:

  • The visibility and range of this scope are second to none in this price point.

  • ​Numerous rounds don’t offset the visibility or accuracy, unless you’re clunking the thing around a bunch. I’ve held zero for over 300 rounds and have friends who have done the same.

  • I ​find the crosshair extremely helpful. Here is a video on using this.

  • Tuning the sight to your liking takes just a few seconds.

And what I don’t like:

  • I'm so used to using Nikon and Leupold that it did take a moment to familiarize myself with set-up. That is the main disadvantage of Vortex, is that they aren’t as widely used and thus there aren’t as many of them out at the range if I feel like asking for advice.

4. Bushnell Optics FFP Illuminated BTR-1 BDC Reticle Riflescope with Target Turrets and Throw Down PCL, 1-4x 24mm

Bushnell Optics FFP Illuminated BTR-1 BDC Reticle Riflescope with Target Turrets and Throw Down PCL, 1-4x 24mm

Bushnell Optics FFP Illuminated BTR-1 BDC Reticle Riflescope with Target Turrets and Throw Down PCL, 1-4x 24mmBushnell Optics FFP Illuminated BTR-1 BDC Reticle Riflescope with Target Turrets and Throw Down PCL, 1-4x 24mm

Bushnell Optics brings the most portable scope on this list to the market. The BDC reticle is awesome and the scope mounts quickly and sternly, the best AR-10 scope for mounting. The illuminated first focal plane is great in low light situations.

This scope is cheap, and it despite the benefits of portability and size, it shows. For a beginner, this scope will suffice while you get comfortable with mounting and looking through a scope. As you progress, however, you’ll want a better scope. (Here is a great video on mounting a scope.) Here is why this made it onto the good scopes for best AR-10 list:

  • There are 11 settings on the focal plane, and all of them are useful. Bushnell Optics didn’t mess around here.

  • Everything about or affected by this scope can be done quickly – mounting, power changes, eye adjustment.

The down side:

  • I​t isn’t as sturdy as the others. I just can’t seem to feel as confident with it because the accuracy doesn’t seem to hold through as many rounds.

  • ​Also, the accuracy isn’t on par with the Nikon scopes. Up to 500 yards is fine, but I had a much harder time the further I walked back.

Conclusion

These days, there are so many scopes on the market that choosing the best one can be challenge. I highly recommend going with the Nikon M-308 SF 4-16x42mm Riflescope w/ Nikoplex Reticle, Black – 16462. There simply aren’t any drawbacks to this scope, from the time you open the box up through the 500th round you’ll fire. It is the highest quality scope on the list here and by far the most effective anywhere near its price range. I’m interested to hear which best scope for ar 10 you end up going with – let’s get a discussion going in the comments here and if you enjoyed this article, please share on social media!

Which Scope Should You Choose Fixed or Variable

Choosing the best riflescope can be a difficult task if you are a new to the game. The first thing that comes to mind is that you are in need of the best scope that suits your budget. There are thousands of options available and finding one to suit your budget leaves you with several factors you need to consider before buying one.

The first and most important questions are for what purpose are you going to use the scope and buying one based on other shooters experience is not always the right choice for you. An optic that works for one shooter may not work for you as one’s eyesight is different to another shooter’s eyesight. If you are using Ar10, you can check the best scope for AR 10, I have review 4 of them.

As you know there are two different types of scopes a variable tactical scope and a fixed scope and today the RifleScopeGuy is going to show you the differences between the two, leaving you to decide which one is best suited for your needs.

Two Types of Magnification

The Fixed Powered Scope

The fixed powered scope has a unique design as it only uses one specific power and you cannot change it. For example, the magnification can be set to 6 x 42. These scopes are more reliable than your variable type of scope. However, they do have some disadvantages you cannot change the power when needed. The advantage is that the fixed scope gives you a brighter and clearer view. The reason for this is that it does not have different lenses for the light to emit through the scope.

The Variable Tactical Scope:

When it comes to shooting the variable tactical scope is more versatile to use as the scopes designed with variable power. You can change the magnification settings to suit your different situations from hunting or shooting for fun at the shooting range.

The Basic Terminology Found In Both Scopes

The only difference between a fixed and variable scope is the magnification settings. The rest of the terminology is basic for both scopes as the following is important when choosing either one.

1. The Objective Lens

The objective diameter is the measurement of the lens found on the end of your scope. They can vary in size from 32 – 50 mm. The only thing that the objective lens does is to gather the image of your target and allows the light to transmit through the scope. The larger the objective lens the more lights transmitted to your eye. The only disadvantage is that the bigger the objective lens is the heavier the scopes designed and needs a higher position.

The objective lens works as follow: a standard 40mm objective lens at 5-x power gives you an exit pupil of 8mm when viewing your target through the ocular lens. This means that the objective lens diameters divided by the magnification and equals the diameter of the exit pupil.

2. The Reticle

The different brands available have different reticles and each shooter has their own preference. You can buy a scope with a mil-dot, MOA, Bullet Drop Compensate for long-range shooting, and standard duplex reticles. The main purpose of the reticle also known as the crosshair is to provide you with a centralized aiming point as each one caters for different shooting purposes.

When you look at the hunting crosshair they are made of wire, but the glass-etched ones are also becoming very popular, as they are precise and durable.

3. A Critical Measurement is the Eye Relief

When deciding on your scope the eye reliefs critical. A handgun scope only has a 20-inch eye relief and suitable to use for short distance shooting. While shooting with a rifle or shotgun that has a powerful recoil needs and optic that gives you a longer eye relief range.

4. The Field of View Varies From One Brand to Another

If you are planning to hunt you, need a wide field of view as you will able to pick your target quickly? If you plan to shoot long distances, the F.O.V is not that critical. The field of view varies from one brand to another and best to read the available specs when buying your scope.

5. The Importance of Light Transmission

Light Transmission is the amount of light transmitted through the scopes lens. Some of the best riflescopes can give you a light transmission of up to 95%. This means that the scope transmits through 95% of light without reflecting it away from the lens. Here magnification plays an important role, as a scope with a good light transmission is easier on your eye to focus when used during the day.

6. The Importance of Parallax Adjustment

When you look at your target at a distance greater than 100 yards parallax occurs either in front or behind the reticle. Once you move your eye from the optical axis of the scope, parallax occurs. This is an important feature to have when buying a long-range scope, as they are equipped with either an adjustable objective or a side focus parallax. With an adjustable objective, you can focus down closer when shooting at short distances. With a side focus adjustment, you do not need to move your head or rifle too much.

7. The Turrets

You can buy a riflescope with exposed or covered turrets. You can buy them in ½ MOA up to ⅛ MOA adjustments. Each adjustment is suitable for different needs and you use the exposed turret for target shooting, as it’s easier to change the distance of the target. Closed turrets are great for hunting as once the scopes sighted there is no need of changing it.

8. The Exit Pupil

Exit pupil measurements important when shooting, especially when the light begins to fade as the higher the exit pupil it allows you to see through the scope for longer. You can measure the exit pupil as follow: you take the objective lens and divide the power magnification. When buying a 3-9×40-magnification scope you take the 40/9 and this equals to 4.4mm of light.

Final Thoughts

As you can see there, are different factors to consider when buying a fixed or variable scope? Another topic that many people argue about is the brand. At the RifleScopeGuy, you can buy different famous brands such as Leupold, Nikon, Vortex, Burris, and Bushnell. By knowing what you are, going to use your scope for is the first step and the second step is to know your basic terminology. When buying the best riflescope whether it be a fixed or variable one the choice is still yours.