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What Are The Good Ar15 Barrel On The Market?(Complete Buying Guide)

When you are building an AR-15, one of the most important aspects of the build is the barrel.

best barrel for ar15

Best Barrel For Ar15

Trying to decide which one is right for you? Look no further. In this article, we will go over our top five choices for AR-15 barrels. We will also talk about the different types of barrels, and what each should be used for.

Obviously, the most feature of any barrel is the accuracy.

If your rifle doesn’t shoot accurately, what point does it serve?

High quality barrels can go a long way in increasing the accuracy of the rifle.

Other features to keep in mind are the durability and the size. Certain metals will be more durable than others due to their chemical composition. A more durable barrel will last longer on your AR-15 build.

Specifically, the material the barrel is made out of can greatly increase the weapon’s accuracy.

If you don't have time, you can quickly check here:

Unlimited Guide About Choosing A Best Barrel For Your Ar15

Barrel Materials

There are two main barrel compositions:

  • Chromoly Steel
  • Stainless Steel

Chromoly steel is an alloy. Barrels made from this material are the most inexpensive and are fairly accurate, but will not last as long.

Stainless steel barrels are more accurate by a comfortable margin. They will also last a little longer, because they are more resistant to corrosion. However, they are slightly more expensive and are heavier.

From there, some barrels are given either a chrome lining or nitride treatment.

Chrome lined barrels will last longer, but will decrease the accuracy.

The chrome lining will preserve the barrel and prevent corrosion even further. However, as the lining wears off, the accuracy of the barrel will be negatively affected. Nitride treated barrels will also last for a long time, but without the decrease in accuracy.

As far as the size is concerned, keep in mind the barrel length requirements in the United States (assuming that is where you are purchasing from).

If your barrel is shorter than 16 inches, your rifle will be considered a short barreled rifle, commonly referred to as an SBR. These weapons are covered under the National Firearms Act, and will require a tax stamp from the ATF. However, for our list, we will focus on 16 inch barrels.

Recommendations

For Competitive Shooting

If you are looking to do competitive shooting that requires extreme accuracy, stainless steel will be the best barrel for you.

The increased accuracy will be the most important for this type of shooting. Avoid chrome lining for competitive shooting, as the accuracy will degrade over time.

For Hunter

For hunting, accuracy is less important.

Especially if you will be hunting in a humid area or in the rain, resistance to corrosion is going to be crucial for this type of shooting.

The most important aspect of the barrel for this type shooting will be to ensure that the barrel is treated somehow, either with a chrome lining or a nitride treatment.

Both chromoly steel and stainless steel are resistant to the elements, so the treatment becomes the most important part for a hunting rifle. A hunter should have best ar15 bipod to hold your ar. 

For Casual Shooter

If you are just a casual shooter, it is dependent on how much you shoot.

If you shoot thousands of rounds per year, you probably are going to want a chrome lined barrel. It will last longer for you.

If you don’t shoot that much and clean your rifle adequately, any barrel choice will work for you. In this situation, we would recommend a stainless steel barrel due to the increased accuracy.

Top Our Pick For Best Barrel For Ar15 In 2017

1. Daniel Defense 16” 5.56MM, Carbine 7

First on our list of best AR-15 barrels is this 16 inch cold hammer forged barrel that is made of chrome moly vanadium.

The fact that the barrel is cold hammer forged creates an excellent barrel. It has a 1:7 twist rate, weighs 1.75 pounds, and has a chrome liner on the inside of the barrel.

The pros of this barrel are the durability and reliability. These features come mostly from the chrome lining and the phosphate exterior finish. Despite the fact that this is a chromoly barrel, the chrome lining will increase the durability. The reliability is backed by Daniel Defense’s warranty to protect against any material defects.

The cons of this barrel are the price and accuracy. This is the most expensive barrel on the list. While this is the most accurate chromoly barrel, stainless steel barrels will still be more accurate.

2. Modern Armory 16” Lightweight Stainless Steel Barrel

Next up is this lightweight stainless steel barrel from Modern Armory. This barrel has a 1:7 twist rate and weighs 1.25 pounds. Since it is stainless steel, this is the best AR-15 barrel for accuracy shooting.

The pros of this barrel are the light weight, accuracy, feed ramps, and the lifetime guarantee. The fact that this barrel is so lightweight gives you the pros of a stainless steel barrel without the primary con. The accuracy of this barrel is unquestioned; Modern Armory guarantees 1 MOA accuracy at 100 yards when it is used properly. Another great feature is the feed ramp, which will help to ensure a round is smoothly chambered each time. The barrel is also available at an excellent price.

As far as cons, the gas block and gas tube aren’t included in the base price, but are still relatively inexpensive.

3. Bear Creek Arsenal 16” Black Nitride 4150 Steel Contour Barrel

Next up is another 16 inch chromoly steel barrel. The barrel has a nitride finish for increased strength and durability. This barrel weighs 2 pounds and has a 1:8 twist rate.

The pros of this barrel are the durability, feed ramp, and price. Due to the nitride finish, this is an extremely durable barrel, and the accuracy will not be as negatively affected. Bear Creek Arsenal expects sub 1 MOA accuracy from this barrel. It is also available at an excellent price.

The cons of this barrel are the weight. As you can see, this is a heavier barrel, so that is something to keep in mind. Another potential con of this barrel is the overall quality. The previous chromoly barrel was cold hammer forged, which increases the quality. However, Bear Creek Arsenal barrels are individually inspected to guarantee their quality.

4. Anderson Manufacturing .223 Wylde 16” Lightweight Barrel

This 16 inch chromoly steel barrel weighs 1.5 pounds and has a 1:8 twist rate. The barrel has a parkerized finish, similar to what the military M4 barrels have. It is the most affordable on our list, and is the best AR-15 barrel for the basic build.

The pros of this barrel are the price and weight. Don’t let the price fool you, Anderson Manufacturing is well known for their quality, and this barrel is no different. However, this price is available at an extremely affordable price. The weight of this barrel is one of the lowest as well, so it would work well for a lightweight build.

The cons of this barrel are the durability. Due to the fact that there is no chrome lining or nitride treatment, this barrel will not be as durable as some of the others.

5. Rock River Arms Chrome Lined 16” CAR Lightweight Barrel Assembly

This barrel from Rock River Arms is a chromoly steel barrel with a chrome lining. The twist rate is 1:9, and the weight is over 2 pounds, although that weight does include a bayonet lug, barrel nut, handguard cap, and the front sight post. Without those parts, this barrel would be close in weight to most of the others on the list.

The pros of this weapon are the durability. Due to the fact that the bore and chamber are chrome lined, this rifle will last thousands and thousands of rounds of ammunition.

The cons of this barrel are the price and accuracy. This is among the most expensive barrels on our list. As previously talked about, accuracy is negatively affected when a barrel is chrome lined.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are plenty of different features and factors to consider when looking into buying a barrel for an AR-15 build.

When looking to purchase, keep in mind the accuracy you require, how much you plan to shoot, and how much you would like to spend.

Also keep in mind any local laws about minimum barrel lengths.

While it is by no means an all-encompassing list, we hope that our list of best AR-15 barrels has at least pointed you in the right direction.

What Is Rust of Gun And How To Remove Rust From A Firearm?

Most modern firearms are treated with some type of exterior coating above the metal to reduce the chance of the metal underneath rusting.

However, this is not to say that it is impossible for a modern firearm to rust. Rusting is most common in older firearms. Looking to fix up one of grandpa’s old guns? Wondering how to get the rust off?

how to remove rust from a gun

how to remove rust from a gun.

Look no further. We will go over the best way to take rust off a firearm, and some things to avoid doing.

It is worth noting that this will only help in removing surface rust off a firearm. If your gun has fully rusted through, it is going to take significantly more work than what we are recommending here.

What is Rust?

Rust forms when iron reacts with oxygen

This process is referred to as oxidization. The process is generally really slow, but can be significantly sped up when the metal is introduced to salt or water.

This is the reason that one day in the rain can cause surface rust to form on a firearm.

How to Remove Rust

Removing rust is not a hard process.

You will have to essentially scrape it off, using a metal that isn’t as hard as the metal of the firearm.

You can use a harder metal, but it will ruin the finish of the firearm. 

For this reason, your best bet to remove the rust off the firearm is going to be copper products. To successfully remove the surface rust, you’re going to want:

  • Copper wool. You can use copper wool to scrape the whole outside
  • Copper brush. The copper brush will help you get into the more tight spaces, and a caliber specific size will allow you to clean the barrel
  • Dry rags. Rags will help to wipe the scraped off rust off the surface of the firearm

Removing the rust is pretty easy. You just need to scratch it off using the copper products already mentioned.

It really is that simple. There is not an easier way to do it safely. It’s just going to take some elbow grease to get the rust off.

How Not to Remove Rust

There are quite a few rust removal products available on the market.

While these may work for other metals, I would strongly recommend against using these chemicals on a firearm.

Since you don’t know what the surface of the firearm was treated with and what else might have been added to the metal, you have no idea how the chemicals will react with the metal of the firearm.

The result could inadvertently ruin your weapon. I have heard of some people using Evapo-Rust as a worst-case scenario rust remover, but would still recommend against that, if at all avoidable.

You should store gun with best gun safe and dehumidifier, it will help your gun cleaner. 

Conclusion

That’s it. It really is that simple to remove the rust off of a firearm.

Unless it is completely rusted through, using some copper wool, a copper brush, and some good old-fashioned elbow grease will take care of the surface rust on a firearm. 

There are some commercially available rust removal chemicals, but I would strongly recommend against using these.

Which’s Better Between Striker Fired vs Hammer Fired?

Despite the fact that a striker and a hammer serve the same purpose, they are actually a little bit different.

Striker Fired vs Hammer Fired

Striker Fired vs Hammer Fired

Ever wondered when a striker fired weapon may be better than a hammer fired weapon?

In this article, we will go over the differences between the two and a comparison about when each firing mechanism is better to have.

For starters, striker fired and hammer fired refer to how the firearm actually fires a bullet.

What's Hammer Fired Weapon?

A hammer fired weapon, as the name may imply, has a hammer.

A perfect example is a revolver and any 1911 semiautomatic pistol.

When you rack the slide of a hammer fired weapon, it cocks the hammer back.

When you pull the trigger, the hammer will fall, which strikes the firing pin. The firing pin then springs forward and punches the primer of the cartridge, which then initiates the propellant that sends the bullet down range.

However, one thing to keep in mind is that not all hammer fired weapons have external hammers. There are some weapons that have internal hammers that you will not be able to see.

What about Striker Fired Weapon?

Striker fired weapons are fired by an internal striker.

Think about any Glock firearm. These all work with an internal striker.

When you rack the slide of a striker fired weapon, the internal striker is cocked. When you pull the trigger, that internal striker is what rides forward to punch the primer. Most striker fired weapons can only be decocked by pulling the trigger.

What's the different between Striker Fired and Hammer Fired? Which's better?

One common thing that you hear is that hammer fired weapons are safer.

Skilled-Amateur-Stiker-Fired-and-Hammer-Fired

Skilled Amateur Stiker Fired and Hammer Fired Source: http://www.awwba.com

People say that because of the fact that you are able to decock the hammer, you are unlikely to accidentally discharge the weapon. Once you rack the slide and a round is chambered, you are able to decock the hammer, if you are not ready to shoot yet.

In a striker fired weapon or a weapon with an internal hammer, you are NOT able to decock the hammer or striker.

Usually, the only way to decock the hammer is to fire the weapon, although you can obviously pull the slide back and take the round of the chamber.

My opinion is that both firearms are definitely safe in the right hands, but the external hammer does add an additional degree of safety.

Another reason that I think hammer fired weapons with an external hammer are slightly safer, is that you can actually see the position of the hammer, so you will know exactly what position the firearm is in.

When to Use Each

In my opinion, hammer fired weapons with an external hammer are excellent for new shooters.

Being able to physically see the position of the hammer, and what pulling the trigger does to the hammer is a tremendous advantage to someone new to firearms. However, this is just my personal opinion. Safe handling of any firearm will make it easy for a new shooter to learn and shoot.

Striker fired weapons are more commonly used as concealed carry weapons.

The reason for this is that the striker fired weapons don’t have a hammer that can catch on the user’s holster or pocket. Since everything is internal, it makes for a sleeker weapon with no snags or catches.

For home defense purposes, I also prefer striker fired weapons. The reason for this is that I like the point and shoot use. In a high stress situation, there is nothing to worry about other than aiming and pulling the trigger.

For hunting and general shooting purposes, either type of weapon will work, and I don’t really have a preference. The important thing is to ensure that you are using the weapon safely, and are familiar with how it functions.

Related: Best shooting sticks for hunting is good accessories for hunter. You should have one.

Conclusion

Overall, both striker fired and hammer fired weapons systems are excellent options.

The primary difference is how the firearms is actually fired. In a striker fired weapon, an internal striker is cocked back and fired when you pull the trigger. In a hammer fired weapon, there is a physical hammer that does the same.

While both weapons have their pros and cons, they are both excellent choices.

Striker fired weapons generally are better in defense situations, but hammer fired weapons will also perform admirably.

New shooters may learn better from hammer fired weapons, and some old school shooters will prefer hammer fired weapons.

It comes down to personal preference, and whatever you can comfortably and safely use.

What’s Scope Ring Height And How To Measuring Scope Ring

Picking out the right scope rings can seem stressful, and is often an overlooked part of pairing your rifle with a scope.

If you don’t make the right selection, your rifle will NOT be as accurate, or even worse, your scope won’t fit at all.

Wondering how to pick scope rings for your rifle?

We will go over what measurements you will need to pick your scope rings.

What's Scope Height and How to measuring it?

Scope height refers to the distance from the center of the scope to the outside of the tube at the thickest point.

To find this, you will have to measure your objective lens diameter in millimeters. The objective lens is the biggest lens, and is the closest to what you are aiming at. In other words, it should be opposite from the lens you are looking through.

Once you have this objective lens diameter, add 2-4 millimeters to account for the tube of the scope. Then, divide that number by 2

Alternatively, you can simply measure the entirety of the scope and tube at the objective lens, and divide that number by 2.

How to Choose Rings For Your Scope

Once you have the scope height, you have the height at which the centerline of the scope must sit above the rail.

To choose the best rings, you should choose the smallest ring and base measurement that is also above the calculated scope height.

However, different manufacturers measure ring heights differently.

The first way is to measure from the base of the rings to the center of the rings. If the manufacturer uses this ring height measurement, all you have to do is add the base height to the ring height, and ensure it is the smallest number that is higher than your scope height.

The next way is to measure from the base of the ring to the inner ring edge. If the manufacturer does this, add 12.7 millimeters for a 1 inch tube or 15 millimeters for a 30 millimeter tube to the combined ring and base height.

Once you’ve added in the extra number, make sure that your selected ring is minimally higher than your scope height. If you plan to buy a sights for your ar, i highly recommend you should read best scope for ar10 to have good choice. 

Conclusion

Overall, these measurements can be confusing for someone new to scopes or firearms.

There are plenty of calculators available online, as well as tables that have already done the calculations for you.

However, this article was simply to give you an idea where these measurements come from you, and help you in picking the correct scope rings for your scope and rifle combination.

Choosing the correct rings for your scope and rifle is of utmost importance. If your scope sits too high, you will be inaccurate. If your scope sits too low, it may not even fit your rifle. Understanding these measurements is extremely important for someone trying to fit their rifle with a scope.

The Difference Between Reflex Sight Vs Red Dot? The Truth You Should Know

Ever wondered whether a red dot sight vs a reflex sight will be better for your rifle?

reflex-sight-vs-red-dot-sight

Reflex sights vs Red Dot sight- What's the truth

For starters, most people are confused about the difference between a red dot sight and a reflex sight. But what is the truth?

“Red dot sight” IS NOT a specific type of sight.

It is actually a general term that is used to describe any kind of weapon optic that uses a red dot as an aiming point. In place of red dots, some sights have green dots or similar electronic images, such as a crosshair, as an aiming point.

There are three different types of “red dot sights”:

  • Prism sights
  • Reflex sights
  • Holographic sights

Each of which is slightly different. As you can see, a reflex sight is actually a type of red dot sight. The two are somewhat interchangeable. When the average person thinks of a “red dot sight” they are commonly thinking of an exposed reflex sight, which we will talk about later.

In this article, we will go over some key similarities and differences between the different styles of sights.

By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of various weapons sights. So now, we're going to find each type of red dot sight

1. Prism Sights

What is A prism sight?

A prism sight is a short, tube-style optic.

While traditional rifle optics use a series of lenses, prism sights use a prism to focus the image you see down the scope.

As a result, a prism scope is much smaller than the traditional rifle scope.

Vortex Optics SPR-1303 Spitfire 3x Prism Scope with EBR-556B Reticle

Vortex Optics SPR-1303 Spitfire 3x Prism Scope with EBR-556B Reticle

The pros of a prism scope are that they are commonly available with a small magnification and they allow for either etched or illuminated reticles.

The biggest downfall is the smaller eye relief, which means that your eye has to be closer to the optic to pick up a proper sight picture.

Prism scopes are somewhat more expensive than reflex sights, but the prices have been on the decline.

Prism sights are ideal for the average target shooter or distance shooter. When using a prism sight, it is harder to reacquire the target due to the eye relief. For someone who is trying to shoot targets at extended distance, the magnification and precision of a prism sight will be perfect.

2. Reflex Sights

What is the Reflex Sights?

Reflex sights use a lens that functions somewhat like a mirror.

Field Sport Red and Green Reflex Sight with 4 Reticles

Field Sport Red and Green Reflex Sight with 4 Reticles

The aiming point is projected forward onto a lens, which reflects it back and allows you to see the red dot.

This type of reflex sight, commonly referred to as an exposed reflex sight, has a very distinct look.

There is no tube-shaped sight, only a small, clear window that the user can see the aiming point on.

However, there is a second type of reflex sight, which is tube shaped.

Tube type is the type of reflex sight will have TWO different lenses, and the aiming point is projected forward from the rear lens to the forward one.

The beam of the light is contained within the tube. Additionally, this type of reflex sight could use tritium in place of a battery powered light beam.

The biggest advantage of a reflex sight is the lack of an eye relief.

This means that your head can be positioned anywhere, you can keep both eyes open while using the weapon, and it is extremely easy to reacquire targets.

Reflex sights are also generally somewhat cheaper than prism sights. Another pro of a reflex sight is the fact that some are available for battery-free use. The one downfall of the reflex sight is that they aren’t magnified, however, some reflex sights are sold with a paired scope that doesn’t have an aiming point.

Reflex sights are an excellent option for many different weapons uses. They are excellent for home defense or tactical uses, some hunting, and for any type of general shooting. For the average rifle user, a reflex sight is what I would recommend.

3. Holographic Sights

So what is Holographic Sights?

Holographic sights are not as common as reflex sights or prism sights.

EOTech 512.A65 Tactical HOLOgraphic AA Batteries Weapon Sight

EOTech 512.A65 Tactical HOLOgraphic AA Batteries Weapon Sight

A holographic sight essentially uses a picture of a reticle that is in between glass layers.

EOTech has the patent for holographic sights, so they are the only type you will see. They have a rectangular field of view and a very small reticle for aiming, which allows for more accurate shooting.

The pros of an EOTech sight are that they are extremely precise and accurate, and they are easy to use.

Similar to the reflex sights, they allow for you to shoot the weapon with both eyes open and easily reacquire targets.

The only cons of EOTech sights is the price. While they aren’t much different than the basic exposed reflex sight, EOTech sights are much more expensive.

An EOTech sight costs roughly 10 times what a cheap exposed reflex sight will cost. While they are certainly better quality, my opinion is that the difference between the two isn’t enough to justify spending that much more money.

However, I would recommend EOTech sights for anyone needing extremely accurate shooting abilities, such as a competitive shooter.

There’s a reason that they are so popular with the United States military. EOTech sights are very precise, and will allow for more accurate shooting over distance.

Conclusion

Overall, reflex sights are often what people consider to be a “red dot sight,” despite the fact that there are THREE different styles of red dot sights.

Most people don’t know, but “red dot sight” is more of a general term than a specific kind of sight.

Reflex sights are the most common and the least expensive, but are somewhat limited. Dependent on your needs, a simple reflex sight will probably meet your needs. Prism sights are often magnified, so they are better at longer distances, but they have an eye relief. Holographic sights are similar to exposed reflex sights, but are much higher quality at a much higher cost. Exposed reflex sights can have an additional scope added, to allow for magnification.

All in all, given today’s technology, there is a reflex sight available that will meet your shooting needs, at a more affordable cost.

Ever wondered whether a red dot sight vs a reflex sight will be better for your rifle?

reflex-sight-vs-red-dot-sight

Reflex sights vs Red Dot sight- What’s the truth

For starters, most people are confused about the difference between a red dot sight and a reflex sight. But what is the truth?

“Red dot sight” IS NOT a specific type of sight.

It is actually a general term that is used to describe any kind of weapon optic that uses a red dot as an aiming point. In place of red dots, some sights have green dots or similar electronic images, such as a crosshair, as an aiming point.

There are three different types of “red dot sights”:

  • Prism sights
  • Reflex sights
  • Holographic sights

Each of which is slightly different. As you can see, a reflex sight is actually a type of red dot sight. The two are somewhat interchangeable. When the average person thinks of a “red dot sight” they are commonly thinking of an exposed reflex sight, which we will talk about later.

In this article, we will go over some key similarities and differences between the different styles of sights.

By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of various weapons sights. So now, we’re going to find each type of red dot sight

1. Prism Sights

What is A prism sight?

A prism sight is a short, tube-style optic.

While traditional rifle optics use a series of lenses, prism sights use a prism to focus the image you see down the scope.

As a result, a prism scope is much smaller than the traditional rifle scope.

Vortex Optics SPR-1303 Spitfire 3x Prism Scope with EBR-556B Reticle

Vortex Optics SPR-1303 Spitfire 3x Prism Scope with EBR-556B Reticle

The pros of a prism scope are that they are commonly available with a small magnification and they allow for either etched or illuminated reticles.

The biggest downfall is the smaller eye relief, which means that your eye has to be closer to the optic to pick up a proper sight picture.

Prism scopes are somewhat more expensive than reflex sights, but the prices have been on the decline.

Prism sights are ideal for the average target shooter or distance shooter. When using a prism sight, it is harder to reacquire the target due to the eye relief. For someone who is trying to shoot targets at extended distance, the magnification and precision of a prism sight will be perfect.

2. Reflex Sights

What is the Reflex Sights?

Reflex sights use a lens that functions somewhat like a mirror.

Field Sport Red and Green Reflex Sight with 4 Reticles

Field Sport Red and Green Reflex Sight with 4 Reticles

The aiming point is projected forward onto a lens, which reflects it back and allows you to see the red dot.

This type of reflex sight, commonly referred to as an exposed reflex sight, has a very distinct look.

There is no tube-shaped sight, only a small, clear window that the user can see the aiming point on.

However, there is a second type of reflex sight, which is tube shaped.

Tube type is the type of reflex sight will have TWO different lenses, and the aiming point is projected forward from the rear lens to the forward one.

The beam of the light is contained within the tube. Additionally, this type of reflex sight could use tritium in place of a battery powered light beam.

The biggest advantage of a reflex sight is the lack of an eye relief.

This means that your head can be positioned anywhere, you can keep both eyes open while using the weapon, and it is extremely easy to reacquire targets.

Reflex sights are also generally somewhat cheaper than prism sights. Another pro of a reflex sight is the fact that some are available for battery-free use. The one downfall of the reflex sight is that they aren’t magnified, however, some reflex sights are sold with a paired scope that doesn’t have an aiming point.

Reflex sights are an excellent option for many different weapons uses. They are excellent for home defense or tactical uses, some hunting, and for any type of general shooting. For the average rifle user, a reflex sight is what I would recommend.

3. Holographic Sights

So what is Holographic Sights?

Holographic sights are not as common as reflex sights or prism sights.

EOTech 512.A65 Tactical HOLOgraphic AA Batteries Weapon Sight

EOTech 512.A65 Tactical HOLOgraphic AA Batteries Weapon Sight

A holographic sight essentially uses a picture of a reticle that is in between glass layers.

EOTech has the patent for holographic sights, so they are the only type you will see. They have a rectangular field of view and a very small reticle for aiming, which allows for more accurate shooting.

The pros of an EOTech sight are that they are extremely precise and accurate, and they are easy to use.

Similar to the reflex sights, they allow for you to shoot the weapon with both eyes open and easily reacquire targets.

The only cons of EOTech sights is the price. While they aren’t much different than the basic exposed reflex sight, EOTech sights are much more expensive.

An EOTech sight costs roughly 10 times what a cheap exposed reflex sight will cost. While they are certainly better quality, my opinion is that the difference between the two isn’t enough to justify spending that much more money.

However, I would recommend EOTech sights for anyone needing extremely accurate shooting abilities, such as a competitive shooter.

There’s a reason that they are so popular with the United States military. EOTech sights are very precise, and will allow for more accurate shooting over distance.

Conclusion

Overall, reflex sights are often what people consider to be a “red dot sight,” despite the fact that there are THREE different styles of red dot sights.

Most people don’t know, but “red dot sight” is more of a general term than a specific kind of sight.

Reflex sights are the most common and the least expensive, but are somewhat limited. Dependent on your needs, a simple reflex sight will probably meet your needs. Prism sights are often magnified, so they are better at longer distances, but they have an eye relief. Holographic sights are similar to exposed reflex sights, but are much higher quality at a much higher cost. Exposed reflex sights can have an additional scope added, to allow for magnification.

All in all, given today’s technology, there is a reflex sight available that will meet your shooting needs, at a more affordable cost.

Is The Sightmark Ultra Shot Pro Spec Sight NV QD Really Good?

Sightmark is well known for their affordably priced weapon’s optics.

Initially, this made me uncomfortable, as I knew they weren’t as high quality as some other available optics.

After plenty of research and testing my friends’ optics, I eventually went with Sightmark’s Ultra Shot QD paired with a Sightmark 3x Magnifier. You can see that sightmark on my AR15 below:

Sightmark Ultra Shot Reflex Sight -1

Sightmark Ultra Shot Reflex Sight -1

Sightmark Ultra Shot Reflex Sight-2

Sightmark Ultra Shot Reflex Sight-2

For me, I knew exactly what I needed in a weapon’s optic, and knew exactly what to expect from the Ultra Shot QD.

Overall, I have not regretted this purchase whatsoever.

It has served the purpose that I bought it for, but I also realize that this sight is not for everyone. As I said previously, there are higher quality optics available, but for the average shooter, the Sightmark Ultra Shot QD will work.

Comparisons 

My reasons for selecting the Ultra Shot QD were the affordability and the ease of use.

My thought process is that a reflex style red dot sight is nothing more than a piece of glass with a laser dot in it. If the sight can be accurately zeroed, and will hold that zero, it works.

For my purposes, I will NOT be beating up my sight, using it in foul weather, or needing overly accurate shots at 300+ meters.

Higher quality sights will be waterproof, have smaller reticles to allow for more accurate shots, and will generally be more durable.

The Ultra Shot QD does not have all of these features. However, for the average shooter, it is more than acceptable.

I use it for range shooting and some hunting with no issues. I have shot far more accurate sights, but I am still able to shoot out to 300 meters accurately using the Ultra Shot QD.

Feature of Sightmark Ultra Shot Pro Spec Sight NV QD

Sightmark Ultra Shot Reflex Sight-4

Sightmark Ultra Shot Reflex Sight-4

The Ultra Shot QD offers four different reticle options and multiple brightness settings.

Some of the best features are how easy it is to install, zero, and use.

The easy clip on the side of the sight allows for it to easily be attached and unattached from the railings on an average AR or other tactical style weapon. The same clip also makes it easy to tighten to fit any railing system.

Compared to some sights, this is a huge positive. However, it will not be affixed to the rail quite as tight as more expensive sights are.

Some will argue that over time, this will affect the accuracy of the sight.

My response to that, is that a knowledgeable shooter should be confirming their zero frequently anyway, so it should be extremely easy to catch and fix this issue.

However, in months of shooting this weapon, I have not had this issue. I have confirmed my zero multiple times, and never had an issue.

Zeroing the sight is a breeze. It requires an Allen wrench, but is an extremely easy sight to zero.

The sight is also extremely easy to use. For the new and experienced shooter alike, it could not be easier. Simply turn the sight on, adjust your brightness, and shoot downrange with both eyes open. It is extremely easy to acquire targets and shoot accurately.

What about Sightmark 3x Tactical Magnifier

I bought this sight in a combo pack that came with a Sightmark 3x Magnifier.

The magnifier is a separate entity (see photos below), and the user is able to slide the magnifier over if they don’t wish to use it. While this magnifier does take some getting used to, it is equally easy to use.

Sightmark Ultra Shot Reflex Sight-3

Sightmark’s Ultra Shot QD paired with a Sightmark 3x Magnifier on my AR15

You will have to get used to where you are placing your head for each shot when you are using the magnifier.

However, once you have it figured out, it is a great addition to the reflex sight.

The fact that you can also slide the magnifier off to the side if you are shooting at a closer range is another awesome feature.

Similar to the reflex sight, there are much higher quality magnifiers out there, but for the average shooter, there is absolutely nothing wrong with this.

Conclution

For the competitive shooter, serious hunter, and optics snobs, I would avoid this sight.

For the new shooter, basic hunter, and especially the casual plinker, this sight is perfect for you.

If you are just looking for an easy to use sight to go out and shoot targets with every once in a while, this is the sight for you. It is affordably priced, easy to use, and reliable. I have had no issues with my sight, but I also knew exactly what to expect and what I wanted it for before I got it.

Overall, this was a great purchase for me.

About the Author: This post from Robert Sagona who is Army Officer in Columbus, US. He has 2 rifle, and 2 shotgun. So amazing. He bought that product in 2016 and completely satisfied with it. So he write some review about this product and take some photo of his gun. Read my review about best gun safe for the money to pick for yourself the best, 

Which SentrySafe Pistol Safe (Biometric Or KeyLock) Is Right For You?

The marketplace for Biometric gun safes is seemingly ever-expanding. There are so many products available that it can be tough to figure out exactly which one is the best buy.

As an experienced shooter, I’m going to provide a full review off the sentry safe biometric quick access pistol safe model # qap1be

But first I’d like to take a moment to emphasize a couple important questions to ask when searching for the best gun safe for you:

  • Where will I store the gun safe?
  • What type of gun do I need it for, and what other material needs to be stored in the safe?
  • Do I trust the Biometric system?

What you’ll find here is one of the most reliable safes on the market, no matter which option you choose. I have the two pistol version, but have used the Biometric option much also.

I’ll break down these versions and the situations each is better for here in this article.

First, quick check 5 option of this Sentry Pistol Safe

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Biometric Gun Safe QAP1BE

Biometric Version

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Biometric Gun Safe

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Biometric Gun Safe

This is the contemporary masterpiece of the SentrySafe pistol safe line.

I’ve never heard of a standard pistol that wasn’t easily accessible in two shakes of a rabbit’s tail with this version.

I’ve tested this safe in a variety of different situations. Staged emergencies, calm openings, finger pressed at odd angles. The safe performed well in all of these situations, and I’ll break them down here:

  • Staged Emergency: Palms were sweaty, and following waking from sleep mode I had to press my finger down firmly to offset any grease. But the safe successfully read my finger and opened. I grabbed the gun with ease despite having perspiration on my hand
  • Odd angle pressing: This one I tried from three different angles. The first was slightly ajar to the left, which the safe opened fine. The second was slightly ajar to the right, and the safe made me try again but opened on the second try. The third situation was a roll of the finger, which surprised me because the Biometric scanner performed well. Overall, I was satisfied with the performance

The override key provides great backup access in the instance that your finger is too sweaty to successfully open the lock.

Scan family member’s fingerprints when you’ll be gone.

What you should do is keep a handkerchief either on or right by the safe and grab it with your scanning finger before trying to open the safe.

If you’re worried about sweat altering the reading, this is a great solution to the problem.

​This product is the best biometric gun safe on the market now!

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Gun Safe, Digital Lock, Single Gun Capacity, QAP1E

Electronic Lock Version

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Gun Safe, Digital Lock, Single Gun Capacity, QAP1E

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Gun Safe, Digital Lock, Single Gun Capacity, QAP1E

This version is basically the same as the Biometric option except it’s got a coded entry instead.

Set your code and be sure to remember it, because even with the override you’ll lose several seconds getting the thing open if you have to use the backup option.

I suggest keeping the code similar to a bank card or online passcode that you’ve memorized and will never forget.

The only benefit of this safe over the previous option is that there is no chance of the finger being misread, or of someone else opening it with their fingerprint.

You can give the code to your family members so that they can access in an emergency, which my neighbor did successfully while he was out of town recently.

His son got into the safe and retrieved the gun, using it in self-defense as a scare tactic but not firing.

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Portable Gun Safe with Key Lock & Tether Cable, Single Gun Capacity, PP1K

Keyed Lock Version

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Portable Gun Safe with Key Lock & Tether Cable, Single Gun Capacity, PP1K

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Portable Gun Safe with Key Lock & Tether Cable, Single Gun Capacity, PP1K

Some people just don’t trust technology when it comes to their guns. If that is you, but you still want the convenience of this SentrySafe product, get the keyed lock version.

The opening is quiet, and although it’s less quick than the Biometric version because you’ve got to put the key in the hole, it’s still rather fast.

One thing to note here is that in an emergency situation, grabbing your key and identifying the keyhole can be a challenge in a pinch.

This is especially true if your hands are sweaty.

Therefore, I highly recommend the Biometric version (or at the very least, the Electronic Lock version).

Your argument is probably that the technology might fail right when you need it most. But the odds of that happening are far less than the chances of human error – you mess up a lot more than a computer does.

I also always ask, if you’re worried about security, why do you have the key to your safe sitting on a chain attached to the safe? Doesn’t seem to smart, does it? Other than that, the keyed lock safe is just as good as SentrySafe’s other options. Here’s a great video review of the safes.

 SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Gun Safe with LED Interior Lights, Two Pistol Capacity, QAP2EL

Two Pistol Capacity Versions + Led light:

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Gun Safe with LED Interior Lights, Two Pistol Capacity, QAP2EL

SentrySafe Pistol Safe, Quick Access Gun Safe with LED Interior Lights, Two Pistol Capacity, QAP2EL

The TWO pistol capacity option is ideal for if you and your partner both need to store a gun with quick access.

It provides the same single-hand access as the other versions, which doesn’t really do much for the second person but is still convenient.

I call attention to the Sleep Mode – it takes only one quick touch to wake and be ready to open, but it’s important to remember that touch because otherwise you’ll go through the opening sequence at the wrong time.

If you’re an ammo freak like me and prefer to always have extra ammo available at a moment’s notice, than this safe is ideal for you because of the space it offers.

I own this version and only keep one gun in it most of the time, using the rest of the space for storage of ammo.

I have a large shelf in the bedroom where I’ve mounted this safe so that any intruder to my home will never make it into the bedroom. It’s quiet, but if you find a squeak begins to happen on opening, just take some WD-40 to the gears and you’ll be fine. 

It's also the best handgun safe for the money in this time.​​

Conclusion

SentrySafe’s Quick Access Pistol safe is the best pistol safe available on the market, particularly in its class.

The variety of options proves that SentrySafe really cares about its customers and their concerns.

There is literally something for everybody here. I always encourage the modern tech variety, and push you to consider the Biometric option for most situations.

If you’ve enjoyed this article, please share on your social channels so that others can learn of the different options SentrySafe has provided here. Leave a comment and tell me which one is your favorite!

Red Dot Vs Magnified Scope. Which Is Better For Your Rifle?

One of the more common issues of discussion among frequent shooters is that of red dot vs scope, 

Red dot vs Scope

Red dot vs Scope

Many hunters wonder which one is better for what type of situation, and if there is ever a time when they should be partial to both.

Personally, I’m a big fan of modern technology when it comes to guns, so the red dot puts me in a sort of heaven.

But today we’ll look at the what red dot and scope are, and what are the differences between them.

What is a red dot, and what is a scope?

So what is the red dot?

Simply put, a red dot is like an optical illusion. Inside a tube or other enclosure on top of the gun, a red dot will be projected onto a screen.

This dot, which is sometimes a line, reticle, or other red honing notation of some kind, appears to be at the same distance as the target. The goal is two-fold:

  • Help the shooter identify the distance between him or herself and the target
  • Improve accuracy and eye line by focusing on the dot

What about a scope?

Contrast this with a scope, which is purely meant to magnify the target and increase the line of sight on it by the shooter.

There is no red line or marking of any kind, it’s basically the same as looking through a telescope, magnifying glass, or other optical funnel.

Here is a great video on the subject:

What are pros and cons of Red Dot and Scope?

Pros and cons of the red dot

There is a reason why red dot scopes have become so heavily used in the military and other high-pressure, intense situations. It is because in short range, rapid fire scenarios, the shooter can aim quicker, follow a moving target with more accuracy, and generally increase their odds of a hit.

The Rifle with Red Dot

The Rifle with Red Dot

The tube of light hits the concave glass lens. The light the shooter sees is the reflection of that light and for field situations, it really helps with accuracy and tracking.

I find that the red dots also help a lot with pinpointing an area on the target that I want to hit while the target is moving. Perhaps that’s because I can make the dot hit that spot for at least a brief second.

No matter the reason, I can’t get that perk with a scope or without using any magnification at all. I also like the ability to subtend either 2, 3, or 4 minutes at 100 years. I most often use the 2 minute option, but have found myself at 3 several times.

On the downside, red dots don’t help as much as a traditional scope with overall accuracy.

You’re also dealing with a battery that may cause issues. This isn’t going to be a problem for those shooters who are fanatical about maintenance and double checking that everything is ready to go before heading into the field.

But if you’re sloppy, you may be caught off guard with no dot when you need it most. Here is a video on using a red dot scope:

What about the Magnified optic scope

The biggest plus to using a scope instead of a red dot is that many of them have variable power settings, and can be adjusted much easier than the red dot devices.

The rifle with Magnified Scope

The rifle with Magnified Scope

Another plus is that the scope is more versatile for both close and long range shooting situations. The varied settings of the scope allow for easy adjustment to fit your specific circumstance.

The scope is, overall, better for accuracy and hit percentage.

On the negative side:

I seem to find it difficult to hit a target at the exact point I’m shooting for. While the scope brings the target into focus well, it does little to help shooters hit a precise point beyond making that point larger in their field of view.

Additionally, I find scopes to be harder to adjust my eyes to specifically because they don’t really do anything other than magnify and focus. I appreciate them holding zero, and am not trying to say I don’t find any value in magnified optic scopes. But for specific shooting in high-pressure situations, they fall behind.

Here is a video on how to sight your rifle scope.

Situational comparison between Red Dot and the Magnified Optics Scope

Let’s go over a couple of scenarios here and decide whether the red dot or the scope is better.

Scenario 1: Short range white tail hunte.

  • The short range gives to the red dot.
  • The quick movement and easy startling of the animal gives to the scope. This is close- I’ve noted red dots ability to move quickly, but because the accuracy is better overall with the scope, it wins this point
  • The ability to hit the body where you prefer gives a point to the red dot here
  • Overall winner: red dot

Scenario 2: long-range hunt or hunt of target at higher elevation than the shooter

  • Need for increase accuracy gives a point to the scope
  • The flying target or uphill moving target definitely goes to the red dot, because you can follow the part of the target that you wish to hit with a higher degree of precision
  • The parallax issue comes into play here as the target moves further away or changes elevation. The red dot, as long as it is in view, can stay over the target and reduce the effect of the parallax issue. Point to the red dot
  • Overall winner: red dot

Conclusion

Now, obviously there is a lot of my personal experience and opinion in this article.

Long-time scope users will come forward saying that the long-distance competition should have gone to the scope. They are correct assuming that their comfort level with the scope is much higher than with the red dot. Other than that, I fail to see how the scope would win.

Overall, I like the red dot much better because of the parallax issue and short distance accuracy. I keep good track of my battery power and other small details, so I never have any problems there.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this. Go ahead and throw your comments in the section down below, and please share on social media. Let’s get a good conversation going!

Mount Your Scope With 5 Best Ar Scope Mount For The Money In 2017

There are so many AR scope mounts available that it can be confusing to know which one to choose.

Best AR Scope Mount For The Money

Best AR Scope Mount For The Money

In my fifty years or more of hunting, I’ve tried a number of them, and today we’ll be discussing five budget-friendly options for scope mounts.

If you need assistance with accuracy, finding and holding zero, and a general improvement in your shooting, this article is for you. Here are the five best AR scope mounts.

Top Our Pick For Best AR Scope Mounts For The Money In 2017

Top 5 Best AR Scope Mount For The Money In 2017

This is my review about 5 best ar scope mount on the market, it will help you find the best for hunting. Check out it:

1. CCOP High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 1-Inch, Black

CCOP High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 1-Inch, Black

1-Inch Ar Scope Mount- CCOP High Profile AR-ArmourTac

I’ve used this scope on my Bushnell 3-9x40 for many years because it is the best AR scope mount on the market.

Before, I was having issues with dealing with wobbly scope mounts that actually hindered my line of sight instead of helped.

This scope is securely fastened on top of the gun and never shakes. I’ve hit targets from 180 yards or more many times and it’s a breeze.

I have heard tell of this scope mount cracking, but that is generally a result of improper securement.

If you know what you’re doing, you can use Loctite on the screws and shouldn’t have any issues.

When secured well, you’ll be able to hold zero with no effort and greatly improve accuracy both at the range and out in the field.

Tight securement and consistency are what makes this one of the best AR scope mounts.

2. CCOP MNT-1516 High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 30m

CCOP MNT-1516 High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 30mm

Best 30mm Scope Mount- 1516 High Profile Ar Scope Mount-

Another solid option for a 30-mm rifle scope.

If you’ve had problems in the past with cracked scopes, this is a great solution because the aluminum alloy is strong enough to handle strong recoil.

The downside to this is that this scope is heavier than many of the more expensive ones. Even with a lot of pushback, this rifle scope holds zero securely as long as you use higher quality screws.

I don’t like the ones that come standard, and recommend upgrading to avoid them being stripped.

3. Burris 410341 AR PEPR 30-mm Scope Mount (Black)

Burris 410341 AR PEPR 30-mm Scope Mount (Black)

30 mm Scope Mount for Ar- Burris 410341

Versatility is the name of the game with this one, the best AR scope mount from Burris.

For any shooters struggling to find the right scope mount for a variety of angles, this one comes in three sizes (1 inch, 30 mm, and 34mm).

You can have the same scope mount on different size guns and always enter the field feeling comfortable in your ability to hold zero across multiple options.

I prefer the Picatinny top because that’s what I’ve been shooting with for many years, but my nephew is on board with the smooth mount and has no problems nailing targets at 150 yards or more.

There are two nuts keeping the mount on the rail and they aren’t going to strip on you.

While that’s a worry with many other low budget mounts, I haven’t heard any tale of that happening with the Burris.

To further the versatility, this scope gives users the ability to mount on a variety of models and sizes, up to 50 mm without too much pressure on the piece.

This scope is best for shooters who spend most of their time at the range instead of in the field because of its weight

4. American Defense AD-RECON STD Riflescope Optic Mount

American Defense AD-RECON STD Riflescope Optic Mount (Black, 30 mm)

30m Ar Scope Mount -American Defense AD-RECON STD

This one speaks to the heart of the true American. The biggest benefit I’ve noticed is the AD-RECON mounts are the best in the industry. Heavy recoil will never be a problem for anyone using this mount.

If you’re shooting with a 1-6x24 scope or something similar, the weight of this mount shouldn’t offset the benefits. This holds true when hiking into the field.

The one thing to do on the side is to get ahold of some Loctite and use it for the screws.

I haven’t seen any stripping issues but for security, it will ensure no issues when in a high-pressure situation. All repositioning can be done by hand if you don’t have a screwdriver or tools.

The floating ring setup is impactful for the heavy hunter and helps separate American Defenseman from other best AR scope mounts on the market. Overall, this is the second best option on this list

5. Accushot UTG High Profile Picatinny/Weaver Rings (1-Inch, 2-Piece)

Accushot UTG High Profile Picatinny/Weaver Rings (1-Inch, 2-Piece)

1 Inch Ar Scope Mount Accushot UTG High Profile Picatinny/Weaver Rings

The two-piece AR scope mount set here is the best value.

If you struggle with recoil issues, these Accushot UTGs will help you hold the gun securely so that you’re firing doesn’t impact accuracy. I also really like their assistance with holding zero.

The flexibility offered by a multi-piece mounting setup with these as a part of it will help accuracy at the range or in the field.

These scope rings perform well as Picatinny/Weaver and any other setup you need high-impact, low budget scope rings to grow your game. Obtaining these scopes online makes them even more wallet friendly.

I set them up in about two minutes on my 20 gauge slug and did it all by hand. Those of you needing simple rings, here is your answer.

Head-to-head comparison

Two of the options here stand out as the best AR scope mounts: The CCOP High-Profile AR Armour Tac and the Burris 410341.

The CCOP is the one I have the most experience with. I turned to their scope mount to solve recoil issues I was having with the previous one.

Since the switch, I’ve had no issues whatsoever.

My first use of the Burris AR scope came about two years ago when I bought a new shotgun that the CCOP wouldn’t fit, at least not in a way that made me comfortable.

I’ve taken it on three hunting trips and love the sturdiness, ease of holding zero, and accuracy at 200 yards. To pick between the two, I encourage you to purchase the Burris 410341 as the best AR scope mount on the market.

Conclusion

If this article proves anything, it’s that you don’t have to spend big on AR scope mounts. These options are well-rounded, each with its pros and cons.

Ultimately, my field experience led me to the Burris and CCOP options that I’ve grown accustomed to. I’ve gotten both my son and brother on board as well.

I encourage you to do the same. If you enjoyed this review, please share on social media and add your thoughts in the comments below. If there is one that needs to be added to the list, let us know!

How To Move A Gun Safe. Best Way You Need To Know

It’s that dreaded moment. The time when you have to move a gun safe from one place to another. Gun safes are notoriously heavy and difficult to move, much like that furniture you inherited from Grandma. Everything about the process basically sucks, but it is doable. Follow this simple series of steps on how to move a gun safe and you’ll have that thing in its new location in no time.

How to move a gun safe

How to move a gun safe

Initial steps

Get the safe as light as possible by removing anything that doesn’t need to be inside. Ammo, anything else that can be put in a separate box for now, should be taken out. If moving to a new house, park the moving truck with the rear facing either the sidewalk or driveway that you will be approaching from. Lower the ramp and be sure the path to get to the truck is made as easy as possible.

For larger safes, provide the team with worker gloves if they don’t already have some. I also find it helpful to provide pizza and beer to those that help me move – it seems to get everyone in a better mood and creates a team atmosphere. Here is a great video.

  • Cover walls, door openings, other furniture, and important items with scratch resistant material. Anything that the safe will pass by in the home should be protected.
  • Clear the path with which the safe will travel to an extra foot on each side, wherever possible. A bit of wobbling and curving will likely occur during transport. You don’t want anything to be struck by the safe should it or your team become frenzied.
  • Get a plank of wood or other solid object to act as a ramp if there are any steps leading from the front door to the vehicle or other area where the safe will be. If this doesn’t seem doable, you’ll need a couple extra people on the lower side as you move the safe down the step.

Moving larger gun safes (over 3 feet tall, too heavy for one person to lift)

Gun safes are heavy in order to make them near impossible to steal should someone intrude into your home. Moving them about is intentionally a process. I moved my 800-pound gun safe from our old house in Naples, Florida to our new spot in Lyndon, Washington and learned the hard way that gun safes aren’t the most transportable of items. We spent an extra grand on gas on the drive because of the added weight. However, I picked up these tips:

  • Get a furniture dolly, or a forklift if you can. I recommend buying one from a home improvement store instead of renting or borrowing one. That way, you’ll have it whenever you need it.
  • When you’re ready to move, have a team of people stand on one side of the safe and lean it back. Slide the dolly underneath the safe and stabilize.
    • I’ll note here that it is super important that the safe be balanced well on the dolly. Due to immense weight, it can fall over and crush individuals if not properly set. Here is a video on the process.
  • Ensure your path is cleared, and begin slowly moving the best gun safe out of the room.

Corners and Immoveable Objects in the way

Going around corners can be tough. The most important thing is to remain calm and proceed slowly. If you can, have a person position themselves on the far side of the safe (the side opposing the direction you are turning into) to provide added support from the back side. This person can forcefully push into the rear as the safe is moved around the corner. Go wide – by this I mean swing the dolly a bit further out than you initially think is necessary. That will allow the safe and dolly to be turned at an easier angle without striking the wall or toppling onto the person guarding the rear.

Loading into moving trucks/vehicles

Ready to exert some strength? Good, because this is the time to show off how those gym sessions have sculpted your muscles.

  • Assemble the entire team (add a few extra people if you can) at the bottom of the ramp leading into the back of the truck.
  • Everyone will need to position themselves comfortable behind the safe. If you have any truck straps, this is a great time to tie them around the safe and have one person stand in front of the safe and pull while everyone else pushes. While pulling won’t be super effective, the main benefit here is that this person acts as a sort of guide to ensure the safe doesn’t derail or fall off the dolly.
  • Once you start pushing the safe up the ramp, DON’T STOP! Momentum is the most important factor here. Get those grunts out and keep pushing. By the time you reach the top of the ladder, you will have enough momentum to easily move the gun safe into the desired position inside the truck.

Moving smaller gun safes

With smaller ones, the process of how to move a gun safe is basically the same buy slightly less intense. Follow the above steps and make adjustments where necessary – you won’t need as many people or as much strength. If the safe can be carried, be sure to have at least two people for added support. Set the safe down gently and be mindful of doorways, walls, and protruding objects when passing through hallways. Do not set the safe on top of anything else – it’s weight may crush other objects.

Conclusion

best gun safe

This is one of the best gun safe

Now you know how to move a gun safe. The process is tough but can be enjoyable with friends and a good attitude. One thing to keep in mind is that when moving the gun safe to a new house, identify in advance the best location for the safe. In the garage or a room where it will not need to be moved ever again. If you enjoyed this article, please share. Knowledge is power, just like teamwork! If you have any tips or anything, feel free to leave them in the comments and we’ll get a discussion going. Check out my recent post about best ar10 scope