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Can I Buy Ammo Online And Where To Buy It?

In the modern age, almost all shopping is done online. Even grocery shopping can be done completely online now. So, with these technological innovations and changes, how does the firearms community change with it?

Wondering if you are able to buy ammunition online? Let’s take a look at some of the laws to keep in mind.

Full metal jacket ammo

Short Answer

The short answer is yes, you can buy ammunition online. However, as with almost anything in the firearms industry, there are some stipulations.

It depends on your State Laws

In some areas, ammunition can’t be shipped in. A few examples are New York City and Washington D.C.

In other areas, you can’t get it shipped to your house. Similar to purchasing a firearm, ammunition can only be shipped to a federal firearms license holder in these areas. Some of these are Massachusetts, New York, Chicago, and most of California.

Lastly, in Illinois and Connecticut, you have to have paperwork on file in order to be eligible to buy ammunition online. Some of this paperwork could be permits or IDs.

The biggest takeaway is to make sure you know the laws in your area. Generally speaking, you can find them with a quick Internet search. However, there are also some websites that have compiled multiple states’ laws into one location. One example is this page on Able’s Shooting:​ https://www.ableammo.com/catalog/how-to-guns.php

However, keep in mind that laws can change. Always double check your own state laws before relying solely on that website or others like it.

Other Restrictions

There are a few other considerations that apply when buying ammunition online. For example, most websites have to charge extra for shipping due to the fact that they are shipping a hazardous material. Federal hazard classification is required, so it costs more money.

It is also common that weapons and ammunition must be purchased separately online.

Many different websites will not ship to Alaska and Hawaii, so be sure to keep that in mind if you are in those areas. 

Should I Buy Ammo Online or In Person 

There are a couple differences between buying ammo online and buying it at the store. The primary ones will be the price and the fact that you can’t actually see the ammunition

While it is not set in stone, there is a good chance you can get a better price online. However, keep in mind that you will have to pay for shipping. Also, some stores will do price matching, so you may be able to get the price in the store down.

For some people, not being able to physically see the ammunition may be a little difficult. Especially if you are newer to firearms, physically seeing the ammunition may make you a little more comfortable that you are getting exactly what you need.

When buying online, there won’t be a store representative there to answer your questions. However, many websites will have frequently asked question pages or online representatives to assist you.

When you buy ammo online, you will not be able to return it. Similarly, nearly every store will not accept returns on ammunition for safety reasons, so there’s not much difference there.

Where Can I Buy Ammunition Online?

There are hundreds of different places online that you can buy ammunition. Brownells, Lucky Gunner, and Cheaper Than Dirt are always popular options, but there are more than a few.

Brownells has the largest supply of many different types of weapons and ammunition, but they can sometimes be beat in price by Cheaper Than Dirt. With these two websites, you really can’t go wrong.

For reloading, I have found that Brownells has a wider variety of products. MidwayUSA also has a great selection of reloading supplies.

Cabela’s and Bass Pro Shops also sell ammunition, but they usually sell at the exact same price as in the store, so there wouldn’t be much incentive to buying online, unless you live in an area where you can’t easily get to an outdoors store.

How Far Can A Bullet Travel? (4 Factors)

Wondering how far a bullet can travel?

The projectile of a rifle cartridge, often called a bullet, can travel at vastly different distances, dependent on a few key factors, that can be dumbed down to basic physics.

how far bullet can travel

how far bullet can travel

The main factors that will affect how far the bullet can travel are: projectile weight, muzzle velocity, trajectory, shape of the bullet, and environmental factors.

Here’s some physics that will blow your mind: if you were to fire a rifle and drop a bullet at the exact same height at the exact same time, the two projectiles would hit the ground at the exact same time.

However, how far downrange would the fired bullet be?

Projectile Weight

If two projectiles are fired in the exact same way, at the exact same velocity, the heavier one will travel slightly further.

The reason for this is that the heavier projectile will have less drop, which means it will travel further before its velocity slows down enough for the resistance of the air to actually significantly slow the bullet down.

Once the air resistance begins to slow down the projectile significantly, the projectile will begin to tumble through the air, which causes it to slow down and eventually fall.

Muzzle Velocity

If two projectiles of the exact same weight are fired the exact same way, the one that is faster will travel further.

The reason for this is the same as the previous one. If the bullet has a greater speed, it will take longer for the air resistance to slow the bullet down.

The primary things that will affect the muzzle velocity are the specific cartridge used and the barrel length.

A cartridge with more powder will produce more muzzle velocity, and longer barrels produce more velocity as well.

Shape of the Bullet

This one boils down to aerodynamics. A longer, skinnier bullet will travel further because it is more aerodynamic. It cuts through the air easier, which allows it to travel further.

Environmental Factors

Increased resistance on the bullet slows it down faster, which then decreases the distance it can travel.

At higher altitudes, air is thinner, so the bullet will travel further.

At lower altitudes, the air is more dense, so the bullet will experience more resistance, and won’t be able to travel as far.

Similarly, cold air is denser, so a bullet will travel further in warm air.

Wind can also affect how far a bullet can travel, as it will blow the bullet side to side as it flies through the air. To preserve ammunition, you should have the best gun safe with dehumidifier, it will help you ammo have good quality.

Conclusion

As you can see, there is no easy, one-size-fits-all answer to this question.

It is entirely based on the other factors.

Thinking about these factors, you will be able to easily decipher what has the most impact on how far a bullet travels, but there is not one number answer to give.

With enough research, you could find a general idea for multiple calibers of weapons, but even then, these factors all apply.

Even if both rounds are 5.56, different rounds fired from different weapons in different environments will significantly change how far the bullet is able to travel.

How Long Will Ammo Last For?

Wondering about the shelf life of ammunition is an extremely common question that most people have.

How Long Will Ammo Last For

How Long Will Ammo Last For

Whether you are hoping to stockpile ammunition for any number of purposes or have found some older ammunition, it is extremely common to wonder how long it will last for.

While there is no one single answer, as not all ammo is the exact same, there are a few rules of thumb to follow.

Most ammunition is good for at least 10 years, but a few factors can affect this. The primary factors that will shorten this shelf life are being exposed to high heat or moisture.

Temperature

At high temperatures, the chemical composition of the gunpowder can start being affected. While it may not be instantaneous, sustained exposure to extremely high heats can negatively impact the ammunition. Over time, it may cause the round to be less effective, and eventually could lead to the ammunition not working.

Moisture

When ammunition is exposed to moisture, whether it is submerged in water or experiences high humidity, the powder could potentially become ineffective.

Once the propellant gets wet, it may not burn, so the ammunition may not function.

Generally speaking, manufacturers say that their ammunition is supposed to last for 10 years. However, this is just a general number that they give.

There is absolutely no reason that the ammo can’t be used after 10 years, if it is stored properly. Ammunition that is stored in a generally cool and dry place will last for well past 10 years. While it may not be the best idea to keep ammunition for this long, there’s no reason that it wouldn’t still function.

3 Tips For Storing Your Ammunition

  • Try to store ammunition indoors in a climate controlled room. Best gun safe is good choice. 
  • If you must store it outdoors or in the attic, keep it in a place that won’t be in direct sunlight
  • Consider using an ammo can – they will keep the ammunition cooler and protect from moisture

One thing to keep in mind is that once your ammunition has been taken out of this cool and dry environment, it should be used at your soonest convenience. 

If you take your ammo out to the range on a hot or rainy day, or take it out hunting in the swamp, your best bet is to expend that ammo sooner rather than later.

Conclusion

In conclusion, ammo will last as long as you treat it right. As long as it’s stored in a cool and dry environment, there is no reason that the ammo can’t last for decades.

However, once it has been exposed to high heat or moisture, you run the risk of it being no good.

The 6.5 Creedmoor Has Skyrocketed To Popularity With Hunters. Why?

When it comes to short-action cartridges, few have seen the rapid rise in popularity of the 6.5 Creedmoor.

is the 6.5 creedmoor a good hunting

Is the 6.5 creedmoor a good hunting (Photo courtesy of Hornady)  http://www.thesportsmanchannel.com/2016/03/6-5-creedmoor-qa-industry-experts/

Reports come in from all over the country about hunters making the switch and moving to this effective, thorough cartridge.

Is this a good thing?

Are hunters actually noticing an improvement in their skill and results?

The answer lies in the testimonials, and we’ve heard so many. But we finally wanted to answer the question flat out: is the 6.5 Creedmoor good for hunting?

Why people love the 6.5 Creedmoor

I firmly believe that part of the obsession is just a trend.

Shooters latching on to what’s current and what the people in the public spotlight are using.

That said, there are a few really incredible happenings that have clearly swayed public opinion on the cartridge. For instance:

  • The 6.5 Creedmoor continues to perform extremely well in competitions of various types. It’s hard to argue against something when a cartridge is tried and tested
  • There has never been an abundance of cartridges designed solely for hunting. Those that perform well in hunting situations tend to receive considerable admiration
  • It’s relatively easy to request a custom build for the 6.5 Creedmoor. With the increasing popularity of customizing everything that has to do with one’s firearm, of course the trend has spilled into cartridges

Any readers of popular shooting pubs like Guns & Ammo and Field and Stream likely have noticed the rise in discussion about the Creedmoor and its firm place in the mainstream arena.

This is a big cause of its increased use, and is a result of it being good for hunting.

Media discussions will continue just as surely as talks around the campfire about the Creedmoor’s durability and dependability across various situations.

Another cause behind the affection is the solid build of the 6.5 Creedmoor.

Everything about the construction is solid and ensure long term performance will not be affected by small adversities.

This stretches beyond the cartridge itself – hunters notice an increase in the longevity of their hunts because they aren’t worn out or suffering from a sore shoulder.

New hunters have an easier time finding their comfort zone and getting up to speed with more experienced hunters.

The 6.5 Creedmoor adapts with many firearms

One of the reasons the 6.5 Creedmoor is so popular with hunters is that it is versatile.

Fans of shooting history may recall that the last time the world saw such a craze with customize-able firearm accessories came in the 1950s with the influx of classic military weaponry to public hands.

6.5 creedmoor with rifle

6.5 creedmoor with rifle https://www.quora.com/Why-are-sniper-rifles-so-expensive#!n=18

A similar craze is happening now, as a clearly superior product continues to increase its market dominance. We’ve yet to see any stain on the reputation, so look for this cartridge to continue increasing in use and popularity.

6.5 cartridges do so well with these guns that it’s a natural fit – and because the Creedmoor is both modern and compatible with popular guns, the resulting success is no surprise.

The Creedmoor performs well in long-range hunts and those with rapidly moving targets. Hunters easily become comfortable with setting the cartridge and follow-up. It’s rare to see any kind of jam or frustration on the part of the hunter when using the 6.5 Creedmoor.

You should have the best gun safe for the money, it will keep safe for your firearms. ​

Hunters need accuracy, and this cartridge delivers

Any who doubt this need to look no further than the competition results over the last few years.

The 6.5 Creedmoor is among the most accurate cartridges available for the everyday hunter. Recoil is not an issue, assisting not only accuracy but hunter comfort as well.

Many find that with the shot, they have no problem holding ground. As a result, they are more confident lining up the shot and coming to zero, knowing that when they pull the trigger their effort will be right on track.

One situation where this cartridge is not great for hunting is for big game.

The 6.5 Creedmoor performs well with mid-sized animals such as deer, and slightly smaller creatures.

But you don’t want to be out there hunting a Sasquatch with this thing. Likewise, short range shots under 25 yards don’t necessitate such a badass cartridge.

While it will certainly get the job done, it’s almost like overkill – unless you’re in practice mode or otherwise trying to up your skill level.

The best long range cartridge

The 6.5 Creedmoor is the best long range cartridge for mid-sized animal hunting.

This is the main reason why it has become so popular, and firmly confirms the fact that this cartridge is good for hunting.

Why?

Durability of the hunter. Namely, his or her shoulder and body. The Creedmoor won’t tear you up after a day of shooting like a .308 will.

The recoil is so negligible that firing dozens of shots on the Creedmoor is causes less wear on the hunter than firing five shots with a .308.

Here is a video of the cartridge in action with Ruger Precison. If you have a Ruger Gun10/22, you should buy the best scope for ruger 10/22, i highly recommend you have one.

It performs better in windy situations as well.

Hunters notice less deflection by wind and less effect on their overall accuracy.

Everything that has to do with the Creedmoor, including stock ammo, is more affordable than many other cartridge selections as well.

Hunters are consistently coming to the conclusion that once you go Creedmoor, you never go back.

Fifty years from now, this cartridge will have the track record and reputation of the most legendary hunting cartridges available – wait and see!

Conclusion

Is the 6.5 Creedmoor is good for hunting?

The answer is a resounding and emphatic ‘YES’. It is great for hunting.

The one thing that may put a dent in the Creedmoor’s rise in use is the invention of a better product that – and here’s the kicker – not only out-performs the Creedmoor, but has a solid marketing team behind it to cause a media blitz and completely overhaul the discussion.

Hopefully this article has shed some light on the 6.5 Creedmoor and why it is so good for hunting.

Please share on social media if you’ve enjoyed this post, and feel free to post your thoughts in the comments below. We always love hearing about new situations where the Creedmoor has done the job. What’s yours?

Which’s Better Between .45 Long Colt vs .44 Magnum Ammo?

As their names may suggest, .45 Long Colt and .44 Magnum are very similar rounds.

Ever wondered what the specific differences are?

In this article, we will go over some key differences, and what situations may be better for each caliber.

Enviroment is one of factor impact weapon range

What is .44 Magnum and .45 Long Colt?

What is .44 Magnum and .45 Long Colt?

.44 Magnum

For starters, the name .44 Magnum is slightly misleading.

.44 Magnum

.44 Magnum midwayusa.com

This name would suggest that the bullet is .44 inches in diameter, when in reality, it is .429 inches in diameter.

The bullet is fired from a 1.285 inch case. This round can be used in handguns, rifles, and revolvers.

While it is newer than .45 Long Colt, it is still a relatively old round.

.45 Long Colt

Unlike the .44 Magnum, .45 Long Colt is true to its name.

.45 Long colt

.45 Long colt ammunitiontogo.com

The bullet is approximately .45 inches in diameter.

Similar to the .44 Magnum, .45 Long Colt is fired from a 1.285 inch case.

This specific round is used solely in revolvers, and is an extremely historic round. It was first designed over a century ago.

What's different between .44 Magnum vs .45 Long Colt?

Size Difference

As you can tell, the .45 Long Colt is the same height as the .44 Magnum, but slightly wider.

As a result,

  • a .44 Magnum bullet is about 96% of the weight of a .45 Long Colt bullet
  • A .45 Long Colt bullet weighs approximately 250 grains, while a .44 Magnum bullet weighs approximately 240 grains

Ballistic Differences

Ballistic testing has shown that .44 Magnum is shot much faster than .45 Long Colt. When shot from a similar length barrel, .44 Magnum will be much faster.

For our purposes, we will use a 5 inch barrel for a comparison.

When shot from a 5 inch barrel, .45 Long Colt has a muzzle velocity of 957 feet per second, while .44 Magnum has a muzzle velocity of 1270 feet per second.

.44 Magnum shoots a bullet that is nearly the exact same size at a much higher rate of speed.

What this means to you, is that .44 Magnum is deadlier.

This improved performance is the result of nearly 100 years of ammunition and weapons technology advancements between the creation of .45 Long Colt and .44 Magnum.

Recommendations

Given this ballistic data, I would recommend using .44 Magnum over .45 Long Colt in a self-defense or hunting scenario.

If you are simply shooting for fun, both cartridges are extremely fun to shoot, and either will work.

Overall, both .44 Magnum and .45 Long Colt are excellent cartridges. While .44 Magnum has better ballistics, .45 Long Colt is an absolutely iconic American cartridge.

With more modern weapon technologies and more versatile weapons, .45 Long Colt has remained relevant today. Weapons such as the Taurus Judge and the Smith & Wesson Governor are capable of shooting .45 Long Colt, along with .410 bore shotgun shells, so the round still sees plenty of use.

Learn What A Bonded Bullet vs Non-Bonded Bullet Is And Which Is Best

If you are new to firearms, then you may have come across bonded or non-bonded bullets and wondered what the difference was.

Bonded Bullet and Non-Bonded Bullet

Well, the answer is really pretty simple, but it has to do with how the bullet is made.

To learn the exact differences between a bonded and non-bonded bullet than continue with reading this article and digging deeper into the subject this article will also provide you valuable information on when it is best to use a bonded or non-bonded round.

What's the different between Bonded Bullet and Non-Bonded Bullet?

Bonded Bullet Characteristics

​So what is the bonded bullet?

A bonded bullet is when the core of the bullet is bonded to the jacket.

This can be done in a variety of ways including electro processes and electro-chemical means.

The way the manufacturer creates a bonded bullet isn’t really the important thing, but the reason why they do it is important.

The main reason for a bonded bullet is it keeps the core and jacket from separating when the bullet penetrates into the target. This is a benefit because it helps the bullet hold most all of its weight into the penetration process.

The reason why the weight is important is the bullet doesn’t expand as rapidly and it goes deeper into the target, especially if the target is thicker fleshed or has a lot of layers.

Enviroment is one of factor impact weapon range

Enviroment is one of factor impact weapon range

The fact that the bullet stays together means a deeper and cleaner wound.

When it comes to self-defense the cleanness of the wound may not matter as much to you, but when hunting this could mean the difference of pieces of bullet scattered throughout your game or it being one chunk of metal for you to pull out when cleaning.

Bonded bullets also do an excellent job of going through bone, so if shot placement is off a little with hunting than the effect will be less noticeable with a bonded bullet.

There are some disadvantages to bonded bullets however. One is it cost more to manufacture them.

No matter how the company does the bonding process it is still an extra step and this extra cost has to be passed on to the customer buying the rounds. 

Also, since there are extra manufacturing steps they may suffer a little in accuracy. This is because even with top quality control the extra steps means that it is harder to get every bullet coming off the line to be identical. You want your bullets to be identical so they will fire the same way and produce the same results. Consistent results and reliability is really important if you are using the rounds for defense. Outside of these factors bonded bullets still have their place, but these are some of the reasons why they still make non-bonded bullets too.

You should buy the best biometric gun safe to storge your weapon​

Non-Bonded Bullets

Non-bonded bullets are rounds that the core of the bullet and the jacket are not connected.

What's this mean?

This means that when the round is fired it is very likely that it will separate into multiple pieces. This is defiantly true if the target is thick or has parts that can grab onto the bullet. If you are firing into thick flesh, then it can pull the jacket from the round. Also, a hard surface can cause the bullet to shatter on impact. Another quality of a non-bonded bullet is that it expands more rapidly. This means that the penetration may not be as deep.

These things may seem like bad things, but they actually don’t have to be. Since the manufacturing is easier non-bonded rounds cost much less and also since there are fewer steps in making them they fire more consistently. This means that the accuracy is better and with good shot placement a non-bonded bullet is excellent at taking down smaller game where you don’t need deeper penetration. The reason less penetration is good is because it damages less of the meat when you are hunting. If you are hunting deer, then if you place your shot behind the front shoulder, then a non-bonded round will bring it down just as easily as a bonded round. Non-bonded rounds however are not good at going through large game.

Which is Best Between Bonded Bullet and Non-Bonded Bullet ?

The answer to which is best between non-bonded and bonded rounds is it depends on the use.

If you are just having target practice, then a non-bonded round would make a lot more sense because it cost less.

Penetration and deformation results don’t matter if you are just shooting targets for fun. If you are shooting small game or want more accuracy, then a non-bonded round is probably just fine.

It will save you some money and will bring down the small game you are shooting or keep you safe if it is a round you are using for defense. If you are hunting bigger game such as elk or shooting through thicker things, then that is when you may want to consider bonded rounds.

The ability to keep shape better and more consistently on impact is important if you need deeper penetration. Also, if you are shooting the bone or joint of the animal instead of behind the boney part than a bonded round may be what you need.

Conclusion

To sum everything up though there is no right or wrong between bonded and non-bonded rounds.

To answer the question of what a bonded round is, it is simple just a round that has the jacket and core connected. This keeps it from separating and helps the round hold its weight and shape.

When choosing a round it is important to consider your use, but picking a bonded bullet or non-bonded bullet is just one question you have to answer.

Outside of this question you also need to consider caliber of the round and how many grains are behind it.

These are just two other simple questions to think about when choosing a round along with if it is bonded or not.

Which Ruger 10/22 Ammo Is The Most Versatile?

Part of the joy of buying a new rifle is figuring out which ammo is the best for that specific gun.

What's best ammo for ruger 10/22?

What's best ammo for ruger 10/22?

There are so many types to choose from that sampling everything at the range just isn’t doable.

Today we’re going to look at the best ammo for a Ruger 10/22 based on a few different situations.

Versatility is key with the Ruger, and a big reason for its popularity. Bulk ammo generally does well, and we’ve identified the best bulk option here.

More specifics may be rejected, but it really depends on what type of barrel you are using.

Let’s take a look:

A few notes on the Ruger 10/22

Try to avoid a BX magazine.

If there is one mag that severely effects which ammo your gun will like, this is it.

CCI is known for not working well with BX, and many have a tough time shooting anything other than general bulk ammo.

Use a 10-round factory magazine. Versatility and dependability are much higher than with a BX or other options.

Get small box of many different types of bullet​

We recommend buying a small box of many different types of bullets and enjoying shooting them.

See what sticks and what doesn’t, and what makes you feel the most comfortable. You’ll probably be able to eliminate some of the options after only a few shots fired.

Once you’ve got the group down to three or four, run through specific scenarios and try each ammo with them.

Accuracy, different distances, moving targets, etc. all may deliver different results with different ammo. The best ammo for a Ruger 10/22 is available in bulk, so keep that in mind.

Best Ruger 10/22 ammo for general high-volume shooting: Remington bulk ammo

Part of what makes ammo work well with specific guns is how smooth it flows through the chamber.

Remington bulk is easy to load and shoot with a Ruger, and doesn’t slow down the process at all.

As far as accuracy, Remington bulk ranks at the top for 25 and 50 yard shots. It is good enough that nailing a specific area on the target is doable from 25 yards and beyond.

Many have found that Remington bulk is the best ammo for a Ruger 10/22 because it’s easy to order in bulk, fits the specifications of the Ruger, and is generic enough that modifications aren’t going to screw everything up.

NOTE: Best scope for ruger 10/22 is good choice for your ruger, it will help you improve your result​

Best Ruger 10/22 ammo for tougher shooting situations: CCI Stinger

Many barrels are not going to eat Stingers the way they eat general bulk ammo.

But CCI Stingers are great for accuracy in adverse conditions. For shots from a range longer than 25 or 50 yards, wind and other weather factors, and moving targets, Stingers really up the shooting game of the average hunter.

CCI lead 40-gram standard are great ammo for the Ruger 10/22.

CCI lead 40-gram

CCI lead 40-gram

At 50 yards, the ammo is a lock with ten shots on a dime.

One thing to watch out for is whether they will cycle well with this gun – if you’ve got a custom barrel or add-ons, this may cause problems.

Other than that, CCI has a lock on the technical shooting aspects of the Ruger 10/22.

Here’s a video of ammo being tested by the Ruger 10/22.

Conclusion

Variety is one of the many benefits of owning a Ruger 10/22.

Most will eat just about any type of ammo, and it will be blatantly apparent if there’s something it doesn’t like.

Keep a bulk ammo on hand at all times, as well as some CCI for more specific situations. When there are choices, the odds of a successful shooting session are much higher.

If you found this article helpful, please share on social media.

Conversation is key in the hunting community, so if you have a specific ammo you love for the Ruger 10/22, share it below in the comments so we can all try it out!

How To Choose The Right Ammunition For Your Firearm

Are you a new gun owner who is trying to figure out the right ammunition for your gun?

Well, this article will help you do just that.

How to Choose the Right Ammunition for your Firearm Based on your Purpose

How to Choose the Right Ammunition for your Firearm Based on your Purpose

Not only is it important to know the size of ammunition you need, but it is also important to consider the use you have intended for the bullets that you are picking out.

After reading this article you will know how to choose the right ammunition for your firearm based on the purpose you have in mind. So go on!!

Bullet Size or Caliber

Before getting into picking out a bullet by purpose it is important that you get the right caliber for your gun.

When you purchased your firearm you probably went over this with the person you were buying the gun from. Their are a lot of different common sizes and each one is better for certain things than others.

  • .22LR- Small round for long riffles or pistols. These can kill and be used for defense, but they aren't much above pellet guns. These are great for learning however because they have little kick and recoil. They are also cheap.
  • 9mm- There are a few rounds between the 22LR and the 9mm, but they are not as common and actually the same size as the 9mm, but just have different counts of gun powder in them. The 9mm is great for the range or self defense. They have enough power to penetrate well as close range, but still easy to fire with little recoil.
  • .38 Special- Again skipping a few to get to this one. This bullet is bigger and has more power behind it than a 9mm. Getting to this size you start to get more recoil This is especially true if you are using this in a smaller gun. The 38 special is mainly seen in revolvers. Also, the same size is the .357 magnum, but it is longer, so be sure to use it in a gun designed for it.
  • .223 and .308 – These are starting to get into rifle rounds. These are seen in assault rifles and are great fun at the range. They also can be used for defense, but the guns firing these are bigger which makes sense since the bullet is larger.
  • 12 Gauge – This is a shotgun round and is the most common type. Their is also 20 gauge which is smaller and 10 gauge which is bigger. Shotgun rounds are used primarily for hunting.

Just remember to pick the right size bullet for your gun. The caliber is how big the diameter of the bullet is and it will match up with the barrel of your firearm. Just remember bigger bullets have more power and also cost more.

Firearm Purpose

People generally have three main purposes for their firearm when it comes time to purchase ammunition.

You probably want to practice with it, go hunting with it, or use it for self defense. Depending on your purpose it will dictate some of the futures you look for when buying ammo.

Target Practice

type of ammo for shooting practic

type of ammo for shooting practic

If you are just going for target practice or training, then you DON'T need the most powerful bullets.

Instead you want to focus on cost of each round.

You don't want to spend a lot on rounds when just shooting them for fun.

For rifles and handguns you probably want to look at FMJ cartridges and bullets. 

FMJ rounds are made with soft lead in the middle and this is surrounded with a metal shell. They are easy to make and thus they are cheap.

If you are shooting a shotgun, then you probably want to look into lightweight target loads. They generally are 7.5 shot or smaller. The pellets on the inside of the shell are normally lead unless you live in an area that requires steel shot.

Outside of cost of ammunition you also want to consider the recoil when picking out rounds for target practice.

If you are shooting all day, then your arm will get tired fast if the gun has a lot of recoil. You should probably look for small-bore rim fire ammunition and avoid magnum rounds.

Using Ammo For Defense

If you are buying ammunition for defense, then cost is a factor, but you really want to make sure you get a round that will stop the threat as quickly as possible.

type of ammo for home defense

type of ammo for home defense

You want a round that will fire reliable and also come out with a lot of force.

A good type of rounds to use are hollow points. These bullets are designed to expand on contact making a larger hole in what they hit.

This is done by having a empty cavity in the tip of the bullet.

Not only does this make a larger wound though, it also helps with penetration and keeping the bullet in the target so no one else gets hurt.

When using a shotgun you should use buckshot rounds.

The pellets are large enough to do good damage. The key when picking out rounds for self defense though is finding ones that transfer all the energy into the target and also penetrates the target so no unintended person gets hurt.

You also want a reliable round to end the situation quickly.

What type of Ammo does Hunter use for Hunting?

For hunting you pretty much want to consider all the same factors as with self defense.

via m01229

You want a bullet that will expand and produce enough damage to the animal that it will kill it quickly and humanly.

That is why if hunting with a shotgun you want to use slugs.

You should NEVER use an FMJ bullet for hunting as it won't kill the animal and it will most likely go straight through.

The difference between ammunition for hunting and defense is you need more penetration for hunting since most hunted animals are larger than humans.

For hunting more power is better,

This means picking out ammunition that produces a lot of force.

This normally means going with a larger caliber bullet.

This is something to keep in mind when purchasing a rifle or handgun if your main intention is hunting you should get something larger up front. (Pick the best handgun safe for the money to keep safety)

Conclusion

So now that you have finished reading this article you should be able to choose the right ammunition for your firearm depending on your purpose.

The two factors to consider when picking out ammunition is caliber of the bullet and also your use for the firearm.

If you are hunting, then you need to get a larger caliber gun.

If you are using it for self defense, then you want reliable rounds that will cause enough damage to end the situation quickly.

If you are just target practicing, then you can go with cheaper FMJ rounds in the caliber for your gun.

Even though there are a lot of different types of bullets there is really only a few uses for them, so you should be able to figure out the right firearm for you now and the right rounds for it.

Full Metal Jacket Vs Hollow Point. When To Use Each And Why?

Full metal jacket or hollow point? This frequent topic of debate is one of the few gun-related topics that actually has fact-based evidence to support both sides of the argument.

photo credit: concealednation

I love hollow point bullets and carry them in my concealed weapon. I also like to use them out in the field, and will get into the reasons why in this article.

What many people don’t understand is that there are significant differences between these types of bullets. Let’s take a look at what those differences are, and when each type is preferable over the other.

Definition of Full Metal Jacket and Hollow Point Ammo

What is full metal jacket ammo?

Simply put, full metal jacket ammo is frequently made of a soft lead core built inside of a shell made up of hard metal such as cupronickel or gilding metal.

The general preference for this type of bullet often stems from the desire for increased muzzle velocity. These bullets maintain their composure and trajectory better than almost any others on the market.

Full metal jacket ammo

Full metal jacket ammo

In some cases, full metal jacket ammo contains a steel alloy casing.

FMJ bullets are incredibly strong – it is difficult for metal piercing substances to damage the bore of the bullet.

This, combined with the fact that these bullets do not expand upon hitting their target, makes them ideal for target shooting. Instead of expansion causing the bullet to slow and stop inside the target, full metal jacket bullets pass through and continue on a trajectory.

Full metal jacket ammo is cleaner than unjacketed bullets.

Everything within the bullet is fully concealed. All that has to do with the shooting process is smooth and straightforward, perfect for semi-autos.

For a 9mm, full metal jacket ammo is cleaner and stronger than hollow point.

What is hollow point ammo?

Hollow point ammo is preferred by hunters and those in defensive situations because it expands upon impact.

This type of ammo maximizes the stopping power of the shot. Targets are crippled and immobilized much more so than they are with full metal jacket ammo, increasing the odds of kill and of a successful hunt.

hollow point ammo

hollow point ammo

The expansion is caused by the hallow shape in the tip of the bullet. This allows the internal organs and tissue of the target to be severely impacted and wounded. Penetration is minimized.

For maximum power, many experienced shooters like to use jacketed hallow point bullets.

I personally have found these bullets extremely effective, as the added layer of metal delivers more impact than they otherwise have. What you will find as you progress as a shooter is that hollow point ammo is more versatile than full metal jacket in many situations.

For a 9mm, hollow point bullets are better for shoot to kill and self-defense situations.

Here’s a demonstration of the two.

Full metal jacket vs hollow point: When to use each, and why

Full metal jacket ammo has a bit of a sexy appeal to it.

New shooters are attracted by media coverage and the 1987 movie of the same name. It’s proven successful and useful in many military situations and other scenarios.

Hollow point bullet that has hit a target and expanded isolated

Hollow point bullet that has hit a target and expanded isolated

However, many experienced shooters as well as concealed carry activists prefer hollow point bullets. Let’s take a look at the breakdown:

  • Self-defense: Full metal jacket ammo is not often used in self-defense situations. Because it is a small-arms projectile, it can be used in concealed carry guns. These bullets are designed to move through its target and keep going, it often isn’t used for self-defense due to the risk of the bullet striking an unintended target. Use hollow point ammo for self-defense
  • Pass-through: Another fact about full metal jacket ammo is that due to the reduced expansion, the fact that they pass through what they hit often leaves targets less impaired than they otherwise would have been. When hunting, this can allow a target to move or remain slightly agile following impact
  • Quick feeding: Full metal jacket ammo feeds quickly and efficiently. Hollow point ammo is slightly less efficient in this category
  • Disco shooting and range practice: When firing at clay pigeons, you don’t really need the bullet to expand. They are going to break immediately upon impact. Full metal jacket bullets are fine for this, as long as there is no risk of unintended impact further down the range. The same goes for standard targets. Really, these situations are where specific shooters like to use what they are comfortable with
  • Hunting: In general, a shooter wants to maximize the impact of his or her shot. To do this, the expansion of the hollow point bullets is extremely preferable. I first figured this out as a kid hunting with my dad, and have never really gone back from it

If you’re planning to head to the gun store to buy some basic ammo for your concealed carry gun or next hunt, the best thing to do is go with hollow point. You’ll find more uses and will have less trouble locating waste and hit targets.

Here is a great video comparing the two.

Conclusion

As you’ve seen here, there is quite a difference in full metal jacket vs hollow point bullets. I hope you’ve gained a better understanding of them.

The general takeaway here is that hollow point bullets expand on contact and thus are more preferable for day-to-day situations because they reduce the risk of hitting targets downfield.

Full metal jacket bullets are stronger and cleaner, and generally better for situations when downfield unintentional targets are not an issue.

If you’ve enjoyed this article, please give it a share on social media. The more education and knowledge we can build in the gun community, the better for all. I’d love to hear about which you prefer – feel free to throw a comment down below and we’ll get a conversation going.

What Is The Different Between Rimfire vs Centerfire?

One of the more common questions asked by new shooters is this: what is the difference between rimfire vs. centerfire?

And, beyond that, why should I choose one over the other? Today we are going to dissect these two types of ammo and determine which one is better for your specific situation.

I personally prefer centerfire based on my shooting style, technique, and hobbies, but there are still small-cartridge situations where rimfire is better. Let’s take a look.

what is the different between Rimfire vs Centerfire

what is the different between Rimfire vs Centerfire

Rimfire vs. Centerfire: What the hell are they?

Rimfire and centerfire refer to the categories of primer ignition systems, basically, what gets the whole process of firing the bullet going.

The explosion caused by the lighting of the primer causes the gunpowder to react and project the bullet forward out of the barrel of the gun. Every single time a gun is fired, this is what happens, regardless of whether a rimfire or centerfire cartridge is being used.

With centerfire cartridges, the explosion is concentrated more centrally in the middle of the cartridge. This creates a more consistent firing of the bullet. Because of this increase in performance, the professionals in the police and military are preferring centerfire cartridges.

Rimfire cartridges see the explosion overtaking more of the cartridge as it is tripped at the rim. The pressure on the bullet isn’t as concentrated on the center of it, and I’ve heard tale of rimfire cartridges not firing with the power of their centerfire counterparts.

Rimfire vs Centerfire: How to they work?

Centerfire cartridges locate the primer in the center of the cartridge case head. These are much more common these days as cartridge size preference trends towards larger sizes. You really won’t find anything other than centerfire cartridges in larger or even medium sizes these days.

The move towards centerfire cartridges is based largely on the fact that they are more reliable in heavy duty situations. Police, military, and serious hunters and shooters have pretty much switched entirely to centerfire cartridges based on their dependability, consistency, and reliability.

Because of this, and because of the fact that so many shooters want to emulate the pros, most shops will stock a wide variety of centerfire cartridges while only stocking a minimal amount of rimfire cartridges.

Rimfire cartridges are pretty much a thing of the past, except for certain gun models. A rimfire cartridge works like this: the firing pin ignites the primer by striking the cartridge’s rim, causing friction and igniting the blast.

What is the difference between Rimfire vs Centerfire?

Basically, the difference starts with the power issues that we’ve discussed above. Rimfire cartridges are cheaper, for sure, and have lower recoil than centerfire cartridges.

One of the biggest drawbacks of rimfire cartridges is how hard they are to find. The older guys that I grew up with have been buying all the stock they can for fear of it no longer being available anywhere that they shop. As a result of this, hardly any new shooters are using rimfire cartridges.

Centerfire cartridges have higher recoil and are more expensive. But, because they are so widely available and there is no fear of them all being bought out or discontinued, the market price will probably eventually drop significantly just based on supply and demand.

So what is the better between Rimfire vs Centerfire?

I highly urge you, even if you are a long-time shooter, to make the switch to centerfire cartridges. The long term sustainability is much better and you’ll find that you spend less money over time because of:

  • Availability
  • Higher amounts of fittings
  • More ability to share and match with other shooters

Who fits rimfire cartridges and who fits centerfire cartridges?

Rimfire cartridges are certainly not as prominent as they once were. Right now, 17 caliber and .22 caliber pistol and rifle cartridges can be found in rimfire variety, along with some shotgun cartridges that are small-bore.

You won’t find any game hunting cartridges using rimfire anymore. Beyond that, mostly just collectors’ items will fit rimfire cartridges. .22LR are the most frequently used rimfire cartridge fittings. You’ll also see them in WMR, Winchester Magnum, Hornady Mach 2, and Hornady Magnum. Not a ton of variety offered here!

For today’s pistol, rifle, and shotgun ammunition, most of what is commonly used will be centerfire. If you are looking for a specific rimfire cartridge, your best bet is going to be to shop online on a store’s website first before visiting in person just to make sure that they will stock it before you head out.

Conclusion

I hope you have gained a solid understanding of the differences between rimfire and centerfire cartridges.

Centerfire is the way of the future. Rimfire will likely continue on its slow and miserable decline.

What the high-impact shooters of the world prefer is what goes, and you’ll be better off siding with them. I started using centerfire cartridges years ago because I predicted this trend after spending years in the military serving my country.

If you have enjoyed this article, please share on social media so that we can increase awareness of the differences between rimfire and centerfire cartridges and get more people switched over.

Feel free to share your comments in the section below and we’ll get a conversation going. Take care!