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Glock 18- Some Important Thing You Need To Know

The Glock 18 is among the most popular handguns on the market for its purposes.

The weapon was originally developed in Austria and introduced in 1982. I first bought a Glock in the early 1990s, after persuasion from a friend whom I’d been visiting the shooting range with frequently.

Glock18

Glock18

Granted, it wasn’t an 18, because they’re near impossible to get.

But it was a Glock, and my buddy had been using one for a few years and loved it. He noted that I would see an increase in enjoyment and accuracy during my shoots.

Let’s take a look at why the Glock 18 is such a legendary piece of equipment, and what separates it from guns that are actually available in the US.

What is the Glock 18?

The Glock 18 is a 9mm chambered gun. Made to be full size, these babies are fully automatic and thus fully illegal for the average citizen to buy.

The full-auto component is the main thing separating the Glock 18 from the Glock 17. Anyone who tells you they’ve shot an 18 is probably full of it and has probably only shot a 17. Unless, of course, they’ve got military or police experience.

Basically, the Glock 18 is one of the most badass pistols ever produced. If you’ve never seen one fired before, check out this video. It will get your heart pumping!

What are the Glock 18’s characteristics and purposes?

The Glock originally was built to meet the needs of the Austrian army after World War II.

Glock 18 Semi Automatic

​Photo from video of TheFirePowerSolution

They were looking to upgrade their standard issue pistol to be self-loading and have a capacity of eight rounds.

The Glock, as it is commonly referred to as, is specifically designed to be one of the safest pistols available. It can be dropped from a height of over 4 feet without firing.

Additionally, the gun is built to resist just about any type of accidental fire. If you are have a glock, i recommend you buy the best gun safe for the money to keep it safe.

The 9mm Glock 18 automatic can fire 1200 rounds minute – not going to be easy to acquire that one! There have been different models and multiple generations of Glock guns produced over the years, none as legendary as the 18.

  • Recoil. As far as recoil, Glock 18s are the best pistol for a short-recoil operated semi-automatic. The barrel is hammer-forged and offers one of the past behind-ammo gas seals ever developed. For quick fire and ease of use, I’ve found my Glock 18 to be an absolute stunner. When I first started using it, it only took one trip to the range for me to feel comfortable with the process of prepping, loading, shooting, and handling the weapon. Because of its size, storage is no problem either
  • Feed. The gun feeds double stack magazines. The magazines used can be swapped out with just about any of the same caliber
  • Sighting. The sighting arrangement on the Glock 18 is a combat ready fixed polymer piece. The front is ramped, the rear is notched, and I have found windage adjustment is much less of an issue here than with other pistols
  • Fire. 1200 rounds per minute, fully automatic. Here’s a video of a kid shooting a Glock 18

Glock 18 add-ons and upgrades

Because of its popularity spanning four decades now, Glock 18 shooters have the luxury of being able to modify their gun rather easily. I’ve got a tactical light on mine that was easy to put on the front rail and has made accuracy and line of sight a non-issue in most situations.

My buddy that got me into the Glock 18 has upgraded his magazine capacity. All this took was a trip to the gun store and a quick consult with the guy behind the counter. He’s also got a real nice pouch that he bought at the shop which fits the increased magazine capacity with no discomfort.

The manufacturer has released upgrades for release levers, trigger upgrades, and even spring cups that prevent the day being ruined by water getting into the firing pin assembly channel. Not a bad list of ways to ensure you’ve got the best pistol available. Most of this stuff is a bit much for simple range practice. But us gun fanatics can never have enough toys to complete the setup and increase our leg to stand on in weapon conversations.

How easy is it to buy a Glock 18?

The simple answer here is: not very easy, at least for the Glock 18s of lore. Here is a quick rundown:

  • Glock 18s that were registered before May 19, 1986 are very rare, so I wouldn’t encourage you to count on finding one of those that is actually legitimate, for anything less than what you’d pay for a timeshare
  • Most Glock 18s automatics made after that date are only available to the military, law enforcement agencies, and specified dealers

The moral of the story here is that you’re not going to get one. Unless you’ve got a lot of money, power, or are in a law enforcement or military profession. But hey, we can all dream. Right?

Conclusion

I’m guessing that this article has you pretty excited about the prospects of shooting a Glock 18.

If you ever get the opportunity to do so, definitely take advantage of it. I’m a Glock enthusiast and can’t recommend it any higher.

Please help us share the stoke – share this article on your social media channels and encourage people to check it out.

Do you have a story to tell about shooting a Glock 18? Go ahead and leave a comment below and tell us all about it. I bet we can get a diary’s worth of stories here. Bonus points to anyone who has a story of using it professionally in the field – thank you for your service and we look forward to hearing your story.

What Is The Diferent Between Full Auto Vs Semi Automatic Gun?

.50 caliber machine gun

What separates a semi-automatic gun from a fully automatic machine gun?

Both of them reload automatically, hence the ‘auto’ label.

The main difference between a semi-automatic and a fully automatic machine gun is that on a semi-automatic, the user must pull the trigger each time he or she wishes the gun to fire.

But let’s dive a little deeper into the two types of weapons and uncover other similarities and differences, as well as uses for both semi-auto vs full-auto guns.

Semi-auto vs full-auto: Breaking it down

What it all comes down to is the ‘action’ on the gun. This refers to the operation of how a gun fires a bullet, ejects the cartridge, and reloads the next round.

Both of these types of guns handle the reloading part in an automated fashion. But the firing is where the difference is.

By definition, a machine gun refers to the fully automated version, which will continue to fire bullets until empty. Therefore, a semi-auto cannot technically be labeled as a machine gun.

  • On a semi-auto, once you pull the trigger to fire a bullet, the expelled gas from the round’s cartridge will eject the bullet casing automatically. Following this, a new round from either an internal or external ammunition magazine will be loaded into the firing chamber
  • For full-autos, this same practice happens. However, a full cycle is completed by pulling the trigger only one time. The first bullet is fired, spent casing ejected by the expelled gas, and a new round is dropped into the firing chamber. If the user continues to hold the trigger, the process will repeat itself indefinitely until the internal or external magazine is out of bullets
  • Think about some of the action and military movies you’ve watched in your life. It is pretty easy to tell when a full-auto gun is being used because of the rapid fire of the weapon with minimal effort from the shooter. Bullets are sprayed thoroughly, even as the shooter adjusts the aim of the weapon or of his/her personal stance. Semi-autos have a slower firing rate, noticeable by watching the pull finger on the shooter

Here is a great video on the differences between semi-auto and full-auto.

Semi-auto vs full-auto: When both are commonly used

In the United States, full-auto weapons are typically only available to the military and law enforcement agencies.

The typical armed citizen cannot walk into a gun store and buy a full-auto machine gun.

The process of obtaining one requires extensive permitting and background checks, typically in line with the needs of the police or military.

Boy with ar 10 semi-auto gun

Individual citizens can attempt to obtain the permitting necessary to purchase a fully automatic weapon, but there is certainly no guarantee of success. Semi-automatic guns can be purchased by citizens who pass the background check and process for obtaining one, and cooperate with any waiting periods or restrictions in the area where they live and are purchasing the gun.

This video explains how a semi-automatic gun works.

Semi-auto vs full-auto: Types of guns

Commonly, semi-automatic guns are shotguns, pistols, and rifles.

These types of guns work well with the automated reload and have a trigger conducive to quick pull and fire. Some will be recoil operated.

This refers to guns that have a locked breach, and are auto-loading. The automatic loading cycle is powered by the recoil.

The force of the shot recoils, emptying the chamber of the used casing and allowing the new bullet to load.

Others are powered by gas instead of recoil. The gas yoked from the fired round drives a piston into the weapon’s barrel. This pushes out the used shell, making room for the new one, which is automatically loaded from either the internal or external magazine by pressure.

No matter which type of power a shooter has in their semi-auto gun, no cocking or additional effort is needed to load the new round.

Here is a video on how a full-auto AK works.

Semi-auto vs full-auto: The debate between the two

There has been much conversation back and forth about whether machine guns, fully automatic, have a viable role in society. If so, what is that role?

Outside of law enforcement and military, there isn’t much of an argument that can succeed at a legal level, at least not right now. But gun hobbyists and fanatics don’t need to get all up in a tiff about it. Semi-automatic guns are honestly pretty impressive these days.

What’s wrong with a little trigger finger exercise? As fast as you can pull, you can shoot round after round until the magazine is empty. Plus, unless you’re in California or another spot that outlaws them, gun owners can employ a multi-burst trigger activator to make the shooting process even faster. With these handy gadgets, recoil is a breeze and shooters notice a significant improvement in shooting speed without much effect on their accuracy – provided they’ve got the shoulder for increased pressure.

Plus, the skill of mastering a semi-auto is something that’s definitely worth bragging about if you can back it up at the range. Trigger masters command a great deal of respect in gun circles.

Many of today’s finest shooters use semi-automatic weapons with the speed and finesse of a machine gun – to the point that it takes a keen eye to tell the difference.

Conclusion

Semi-auto vs full-auto is going to be an ongoing conversation in gun circles.

Hopefully this article has given you a better understanding of the difference between the two, and of their important place in society. If you’ve enjoyed this article, please share across your social media channels.

Remember that next time someone at the range starts rambling about machine guns, they are probably full of it. You now can correct them on the fact that a semi-auto is not technically a machine gun. The more knowledge in the gun community, the better.

And i have write a post about best gun safe for the money, you should choose the best for your gun. ​

I’d love to get some fresh takes on people’s favorite semi-autos as well as machine guns, so feel free to drop a comment below with what you’re shooting. Also note what you hope to be shooting next time you get a nice bonus at work.

SP101 And GP100 Ruger- Which Is Better For Personal Protection?

Which pistol to carry for defense purposes is an important question. Over the years, I’ve switched between a number of different guns for carry purposes and to use at the range. Two of them have stood out above the others as the most appropriate for general carry – the SP101 and the gp100 Ruger.

sp101 vs gp100 ruger

sp101 vs gp100 ruger

I spent about ten years with an SP101 type model after it came to market in 1989 before recently switching to the GP100.

Today, I’ll tell you what I liked and didn’t like about both and we’ll compare the SP101 vs gp100 Ruger. Let’s get started.

The breakdown

The SP101 maintains the feel and functionality of classic concealed carry guns. It’s small, in the featherweight class, and easy to draw. 

  • The best thing about it in this case is that the gun handles like a high-performance weapon. It’s powerful, relatively easy to aim and shoot, and certainly is tough to detect before you draw
  • It comes as a 5-shot, 6-shot, or 8-shot
  • It has a strong recoil, though, and it does take a moment to position yourself before shooting. Those action shots in the movies where the character runs while drawing and shooting aren’t really that realistic with the SP101 – in actuality, there’s a good amount of kick and continuing to run in a straight line would be near impossible

The GP100 is actually a modernized version of what was known as the Security Six. Physically, the newer model is much cleaner and fires better. It is highly preferable to me in day-to-day situations. I keep urging my wife to get one too, because she is now jealous of mine. 

  • It has a comfortable feel to it and is certainly a featherweight at 2.2 pounds. It is popular with a handful of law enforcement departments around the world because of its versatility
  • Depending on the catalog number, this gun handles anything from the .357 Magnum to a .44 Special. It’s got a wide range of caliber fittings and barrel lengths, coming as a 5-shot, 6-shot, 7-shot, or 10-shot.
  • I’m not as big of a fan of the after-market support and add-ons for the GP100, this is one thing I really do love about the SP101.

Which is better for personal protection GP101 or SP101?

In short, the GP100 is a better gun for concealed carry and personal protection. The gun itself is an evolution of previous hand-held revolvers, marking an improvement upon them, and it has been modified even since as it fits different caliber and barrel lengths. The gun is more versatile and can be better fitted to your personal preferences.

I find it more comfortable in concealed mode, in fact I hardly even notice that it is there. I love .357 Magnums, and the flow of this gun throughout the loading and shooting process is very smooth.

The SP101 is more of a heavy-duty type small revolver. Over the years, it’s been used by police departments as a quick-grab backup weapon, and is designed for situations where it will be used by a highly trained professional.

I used it quite a bit at the range to get a good feel, and I’ve got to say that I was able to feel comfortable with the GP100 much faster than the SP101.

They are both great guns. But let’s say that you are carrying a gun for the instance when a bad guy pops out of nowhere and you (as a common citizen, not a police officer) have to react quickly and depend on your gun to perform every time. The GP100 is easier to handle and easier to shoot.

Amenities, action, and sights: Oh my!

Both of these handguns come in multiple versions, barrel lengths, and caliber, fit to taste.

What I really like about the GP100 is the shot capacity and variety of calibers. Almost all, with the exception of the GPF-840 and the 1757, are full shroud, which is a huge plus for me. I prefer one of the variations with adjustable sights, because I’m old school and like to try out many different options before settling on my emergency go-to.

Ruger GP 100 Match Champion (.357 Magnum)

Ruger GP 100 Match Champion (.357 Magnum). Image from hickok45

The SP101 is a bit heavier than many other revolvers (not enough to cause a major disturbance, but if weight is your biggest factor, this is another reason to go with the GP 100). This gun does have a smooth double action, along with a bobbed hammer, two things I really like and that kept it at my waist for nearly ten years. It offers large, high-visibility sights, which I also loved. However, during rapid fire, I found I had a harder time tracking the sights than I have with the GP100.

Ruger SP101 .357 Magnum. Image from hickok45

Scorecard

As a review, let’s take a look at the points each gun has in its category here at the end of the comparison:

GP100

  • More options for customization
  • Better sight tracking during rapid fire
  • Variety of calibers is a big plus
  • Shot capacity is a big plus
  • Definite proof that it has gotten better over the years

SP101

  • Better after-market support and add-ons.
  • Smooth double action and bobbed hammer making the shooting fun and painless.
  • Very consistent, but with a higher recoil issue and (I felt) tougher to master.

Conclusion

Both the GP100 and the SP101 are fine small size revolvers to keep by your side in concealed carry mode.

Both can get the job the done.

But what has really drawn me to switch from the SP101 to the GP100 is the ease of comfortability I felt when learning the gun that was new to me. It takes a lot to get an old timer like me to change his ways, but the GP100 is the best revolver I have ever shot. I’ll keep it by my side until I die.

If you have enjoyed this article, please share on social media. I’d love to see how far we can push the word of the GP100. Feel free to leave comments below, let’s get a discussion going!. Oh one thing, if you need the gun safe for this ruger gun, you can take a look my post about best handgun safe for the money

Which Shotgun Choke Is The Most Open?

Which shotgun choke is the most open? For those of us in the firearms community, the term ‘pattern’ is something that arises frequently. This refers to the column of round shot pellets leaving the barrel of the gun. As they move further away, they begin to spread out. Towards the end of the shotgun’s range, targets will be missed by the pellets as they spread further apart.

The shotgun choke is the response of gun designers in their attempt to combat this effect. Choking means that the bore is restricted, which will keep the pattern closer together for longer distances.

Which shotgun choke is the most open?

The most open shotgun choke is called a ‘cylinder.’ The easiest way for you to analyze this is to look at the muzzle end of the barrel. You’ll notice that with cylinder chokes, there actually isn’t any constriction at all. The diameter of the choke is the same as the inside of the shotgun barrel. There is the lowest amount of bore reduction.

Restriction is essentially non-existent here, which causes the pattern to spread out much more so than with higher restriction chokes.

The tightest kind of shotgun chokes are called ‘extra tights.’ These are basically the opposite of a cylinder choke. Restriction of the pattern’s spread is maximized, for increased long-range target accuracy.

For larger game, tighter chokes can help with targets on the move and further away. But for me, it’s been many years since I’ve used a tight choke. I don’t do much other than duck hunting anymore. I’ve got a buddy who is a diehard fan of turkey hunting, and he prefers to use a tight choke. Here is a great video explaining shotgun chokes with visuals.

Why do I want to use a looser choke?

The biggest advantage to using a looser choke is seen particularly by duck hunters. With waterfowl, a super tight choke can have two effects when using steel pellets (lead pellets were outlawed by the federal government for waterfowl hunting in the nineties):

  • Potential damage to the barrel. Steel can damage the barrel because it isn’t as malleable as lead. It doesn’t cooperate as well with tight chokes.
  • It can harm the meat on the animal. Obviously, if you’re hunting for food, you don’t want the meat to be tarnished by the shot.
  • I really like the way these guys explained why they use certain chokes on duck hunts.:

So, to prevent these two things from happening, waterfowl hunters began using more open chokes. Hence, the rising popularity of the cyclinder.

I first began to prefer an open choke shortly after the regulations took place in 1991. By the following season, I began noticing severe distress to the barrel of my shotgun. This began to have a great impact on my hunting, so I started using the cyclinder choke.

Ever since, I’ve been working on ways to maximize my shooting accuracy with the most open choke, and have gotten a lot better. It takes an immense amount of practice, but at the end of the day I have better meat resulting from my increased shooting skill level. All without damaging the barrel of my gun.

The bottom line

When selecting the best choke for your shotgun, the most important factor is to consider what type of game you are hunting. For turkeys and larger game birds, a tighter choke is going to be the better option.

For those of us duck hunters, the cyclinder is the most open shotgun choke and therefore the best for us. I always recommend heading to the range and spending ample time on the patterning board prior to hitting the field. Notice how the pellets strike the target, and adjust your shooting technique as necessary.

Many new hunters don’t realize the advantages of using an open choke on their shotgun when waterfowl hunting. I’d appreciate it if you shared this article on social media so that more new hunters can learn of the pros and cons of different chokes. Do you have any techniques you’d like to share? Go ahead and leave them here in the comments, and we’ll get a discussion going.

What Is The First Step In Cleaning A Firearm?

Perhaps your firearm has been on a good adventure with you, or maybe you just bought it and want to make sure it is ready for the field.

So what is the first step in cleaning a firearm?

You’ll want to make sure the process is done correctly so as not to damage the weapon or cause rust. It took me several cleaning processes before I really felt comfortable with cleaning my firearm. Today, I’ll show you my process and the best practices for keeping that gun clean.

Buy a cleaning kit.

These can be pretty simple. You’ll want to make sure that you have these items:

  • Bore brush
  • Oil
  • Rag
  • Cotton swabs
  • Ample lighting in the leaning area
  • Patch holder with patches

Have a good commercial solvent

Basically, a solvent is a substance that has the ability to dissolve something else. This is incredibly important when cleaning a firearm. Unlike washing dishes or cleaning most other things, a simple rub down with some soap isn’t going to cut it here.

  • Use a garage or other area with open doors/windows to keep fresh air flowing in.
  • Clean all metal parts of the firearm thoroughly with the commercial solvent. Make sure the barrel is getting a good clean as well.
  • Clean the bore up through the breech end, wherever possible. Spend ample time here making sure that the bore is as clean as the barrel and rest of the metal parts on the weapon.
  • Run the dry patch through to double check for cleanliness. Let the area dry before proceeding.

Stick an oily patch into the barrel

The goal here is to get it nice and lubed up. Apply a liberal dose of oil onto the patch and slide it back and forth in the barrel of the gun, ensuring the entire area is reached. Any parts of the gun that are metal should receive a light coating of oil. Here is a great video on how to clean a firearm. It should go without saying, but always make sure your gun is unloaded before starting this process:

  • This is when you use the patches inside the barrel to get it clean

Store the firearm in a horizontal position

This will help it dry and keep the oil on all parts that need it. If storing firearm horizontally is a challenge, face the muzzle down so that any run-age will come out of the barrel instead of clogging the back end. If you have a gun rack, I always suggest designating a specific place for firearms that have just been cleaned. The best gun safe is my recommend

  • Do not leave the weapon laying on its side on a table or counter.
  • Do not store vertically with the butt of the gun facing down.

Prior to firing the gun, run a clean patch through the barrel

This removes any excess oil or dirt. It makes sure that everything will go smoothly when firing, and that there aren’t any clogs or backlogs within the barrel. Here are a few tips I have for streamlining your firearm cleaning process:

  • Keep oil on hand at all times. Have it designated as only for cleaning your firearms, that way you won’t use it for anything else. Storing it in the gun safe or in the same general area as your guns will make sure that you always know where it is, and no one else is using it for other purposes.
  • Get into the habit of cleaning your firearms regularly. When starting the first step in cleaning a firearm, always follow the same procedure. There shouldn’t be any variations when cleaning the same gun. Consistency is key!
  • Dedicate a rag for the task. Always keep it on hand with the oil.

There you have it. If someone asks you what is the first step in cleaning a firearm, you can point them to this article. I hope you found this informative. If so, we’d appreciate it if you shared on social media. If you have any tips for cleaning a firearm that we didn’t mention here, feel free to leave a comment. Let’s get a discussion going.

Which Scope Should You Choose Fixed or Variable

Choosing the best riflescope can be a difficult task if you are a new to the game.

The first thing that comes to mind is that you are in need of the best scope that suits your budget. There are thousands of options available and finding one to suit your budget leaves you with several factors you need to consider before buying one.

The first and most important questions are for what purpose are you going to use the scope and buying one based on other shooters experience is not always the right choice for you. An optic that works for one shooter may not work for you as one’s eyesight is different to another shooter’s eyesight. If you are using Ar10, you can check the best scope for AR 10, I have review 4 of them.

As you know there are two different types of scopes a variable tactical scope and a fixed scope and today the RifleScopeGuy is going to show you the differences between the two, leaving you to decide which one is best suited for your needs.

Two Types of Magnification

The Fixed Powered Scope

The fixed powered scope has a unique design as it only uses one specific power and you cannot change it. For example, the magnification can be set to 6 x 42. These scopes are more reliable than your variable type of scope. However, they do have some disadvantages you cannot change the power when needed. The advantage is that the fixed scope gives you a brighter and clearer view. The reason for this is that it does not have different lenses for the light to emit through the scope.

The Variable Tactical Scope:

When it comes to shooting the variable tactical scope is more versatile to use as the scopes designed with variable power. You can change the magnification settings to suit your different situations from hunting or shooting for fun at the shooting range.

The Basic Terminology Found In Both Scopes

The only difference between a fixed and variable scope is the magnification settings. The rest of the terminology is basic for both scopes as the following is important when choosing either one.

1. The Objective Lens

The objective diameter is the measurement of the lens found on the end of your scope. They can vary in size from 32 – 50 mm. The only thing that the objective lens does is to gather the image of your target and allows the light to transmit through the scope. The larger the objective lens the more lights transmitted to your eye. The only disadvantage is that the bigger the objective lens is the heavier the scopes designed and needs a higher position.

The objective lens works as follow: a standard 40mm objective lens at 5-x power gives you an exit pupil of 8mm when viewing your target through the ocular lens. This means that the objective lens diameters divided by the magnification and equals the diameter of the exit pupil.

2. The Reticle

The different brands available have different reticles and each shooter has their own preference. You can buy a scope with a mil-dot, MOA, Bullet Drop Compensate for long-range shooting, and standard duplex reticles. The main purpose of the reticle also known as the crosshair is to provide you with a centralized aiming point as each one caters for different shooting purposes.

When you look at the hunting crosshair they are made of wire, but the glass-etched ones are also becoming very popular, as they are precise and durable.

3. A Critical Measurement is the Eye Relief

When deciding on your scope the eye reliefs critical. A handgun scope only has a 20-inch eye relief and suitable to use for short distance shooting. While shooting with a rifle or shotgun that has a powerful recoil needs and optic that gives you a longer eye relief range.

4. The Field of View Varies From One Brand to Another

If you are planning to hunt you, need a wide field of view as you will able to pick your target quickly? If you plan to shoot long distances, the F.O.V is not that critical. The field of view varies from one brand to another and best to read the available specs when buying your scope.

5. The Importance of Light Transmission

Light Transmission is the amount of light transmitted through the scopes lens. Some of the best riflescopes can give you a light transmission of up to 95%. This means that the scope transmits through 95% of light without reflecting it away from the lens. Here magnification plays an important role, as a scope with a good light transmission is easier on your eye to focus when used during the day.

6. The Importance of Parallax Adjustment

When you look at your target at a distance greater than 100 yards parallax occurs either in front or behind the reticle. Once you move your eye from the optical axis of the scope, parallax occurs. This is an important feature to have when buying a long-range scope, as they are equipped with either an adjustable objective or a side focus parallax. With an adjustable objective, you can focus down closer when shooting at short distances. With a side focus adjustment, you do not need to move your head or rifle too much.

7. The Turrets

You can buy a riflescope with exposed or covered turrets. You can buy them in ½ MOA up to ⅛ MOA adjustments. Each adjustment is suitable for different needs and you use the exposed turret for target shooting, as it’s easier to change the distance of the target. Closed turrets are great for hunting as once the scopes sighted there is no need of changing it.

8. The Exit Pupil

Exit pupil measurements important when shooting, especially when the light begins to fade as the higher the exit pupil it allows you to see through the scope for longer. You can measure the exit pupil as follow: you take the objective lens and divide the power magnification. When buying a 3-9×40-magnification scope you take the 40/9 and this equals to 4.4mm of light.

Final Thoughts

As you can see there, are different factors to consider when buying a fixed or variable scope? Another topic that many people argue about is the brand. At the RifleScopeGuy, you can buy different famous brands such as Leupold, Nikon, Vortex, Burris, and Bushnell. By knowing what you are, going to use your scope for is the first step and the second step is to know your basic terminology. When buying the best riflescope whether it be a fixed or variable one the choice is still yours.

The Evolution Of The AR10 And The Best AR10 Versions

The AR-10 is definitely one of the rifles that you would like to have if you are a rifle aficionado, not only because it is good to use, but also because it is the forerunner of other versions of ArmaLite. There is surely no AR-15 without an AR-10; hence, it is but good to know where the heck the modern versions of ArmaLite came from.

How to find the best ar10 for the money

How to find the best ar10 for the money. Source: en.wikipedia.org

There were times likewise when the AR-10 ruled it over any other rifles available in the market. When Eugene Stoner conceived of the AR-10 in the late 50’s, he definitely knew that what he was up to was something great. Hence, when the first AR-10 graced the rifle market, most rifle enthusiasts and even hunting enthusiasts wanted to get hold of the AR-10.

The reason for this is that it was very innovative with a straight-line barrel and stock design that was never been used before. It is made of phenolic composite and some forged alloy parts which make AR-10 significantly smaller as compared to other rifles then, and allows its users to have easier control during automatic firing. Moreover, it was definitely lighter as compared to other infantry rifles during those days.

Throughout its existence, the AR-10 has evolved and had been rescaled. In fact, it was rescaled in 1957 and had been substantially improved to allow for the use of .223 Remington cartridge. However, it was not only the military who wanted to gain access to the use of AR-10; even governments who had learned of the effectiveness and efficiency of AR-10 had become desirous of buying this highly taunted rifle.

Find the best scope for AR 10 in my recent article

Variants of the best AR10

best-ar10

Fairchild holds the patent for the manufacturing of AR-10 since the late 1950s. In 1956, when the US Army was bent on replacing the old M1 Garand which was quite heavy, Fairchild submitted two prototype of AR-10. However, Fairchild was not successful in its bid at that time for the conventional T44 won the bid.

When the manufacturing license of AR-10 was bought by Artillerie Inrichtingen (A.I), AR-10 had its chance of being mass produced. Nicaragua ordered around 7,500 rifles; however, the deal was canceled when General Anastasio Somoza was almost hit by the ejector while doing the endurance test for the old AR-10.

Experts in firearms basically see three distinct variants of AR-10 that were produced under A.I. These were the Sudanese, the Transitional, and the Portuguese Models of AR-10. The good tips for you, you can use the best shooting ticks to hold the ar10, it will help you have the best target.

1. The Sudanese Models

The Sudanese models were built by A.I for the Sudanese Government which ordered them. In 1958, the Sudan Government ordered around 2,500 rifles.

This model was distinct because it was fitted with lightweight fluted steel barrel with flash suppressor. It also had a bayonet lug, just like the rifles of the old days. Moreover, it had lightweight furniture made of fiberglass, and sight graduations written in Arabic. With empty magazine, it only weighs around 3.3 kg.

The Sudanese Government paid around $225 each for these rifles. The Sudanese model had been in service in Sudanese Army until the 1985.

2. The Transitional Model

During the time in between the production of the Sudanese Model and the Portuguese Model, there were other versions of AR-10 that were manufactured by A.I. for specific clients.

These versions were rightly termed by firearms experts as the Transitional Models. For example, Finland and Germany had a special version of AR-10 made for their evaluation. Likewise, KLM requested a 16″ barreled AR-10 for its survival kit for its crews.

There were also other Transitional AR-10 made due to specific requests from clients, and some of these were fitted with folding bipod allowing the user to lay the firearm flat under his/her forearm. Other countries such as Austria, Germany, Netherlands, South Africa, and even Finland did purchase a limited number of AR-10 transitional Models. Italy also requested several units of AR-10 for its Navy.

3. Portuguese Model

The third design from A.I was the Portuguese Model. As the AR10 became very popular among those countries that had become acquainted with it, AR-10 also gained its final innovations.

Based on data gathered about the use of AR-10, A.I began to produce the Portuguese Model AR-10. The features of the Portuguese Model include a heavier barrel that has chrome-lined chamber, removable hand-guards, optional bipod, wider bolt lugs, a novel and simplified gas regulator, stronger extractor, a forward-bolt assist cocking handle. Around 5 thousand variants of this model had been produced.

More than 10 thousand units of AR10 were produced before the Fairchild dissolved its manufacturing contract with A.I. Since 1995, newer versions of AR-10 were produced and these versions were collectively called AR10B.

Tips on Buying an AR10.

The usual tips that you should be cognizant of if you want to own an AR-10 include knowing your options. You can either assemble your own AR-10 or buy a preassembled one. If you are going to assemble, there are tips that you should know, and you should also have knowledge on how to shop around for quality parts. However, if you want to buy a ready-made AR-10, you can easily avail of a pre-assembled one. Yet, bear in mind that the quality of the AR-10 unit that you would get depends on the quality standard of the manufacturer from which you have chosen to buy.

Conclusion

The AR10 will always remain a desirable rifle for rifle aficionados. Despite the emergence of newer versions and more novel rifles that take its cue from the radical innovations made throughout the radical evolution of AR-10, the rustic AR-10 will still remain very dear to the heart of rifle aficionados. And i have article about ar10 vs ar15, you can find a lot useful information. Let’s buy the best ar10 for money to use.

What Is Ar10 Vs Ar15? Which Is Better? Compare Them!

In October 1954, the Fairchild Engine and Aircraft Company’s ArmaLite Division was established under the tutelage of George Sullivan and it began working on the development of the lightweight paratrooper’s rifle—the AR-1 “Parasniper” rifle.

The AR-5 survival rifle for downed aircrew and pilots of the U. S. Air Force immediately followed the development of AR-1. While testing the AR-5 on a shooting range, Sullivan met the talented Eugene Stoner, whom Sullivan hired immediately as his chief design engineer. By 1955, the first prototype of the novel AR-10 had been completed.

Due to the AR-10’s failure to gain significant market, the ArmaLite design team created the AR-15, a scaled-down version of the AR10.

The AR15 became the basis for the famous M16 “Armalite” assault rifle. All ArmaLite guns and rifles bear the prefix AR to indicate that they are part of the evolution of the original AR-1. In 1959, ArmaLite sold its rights on the AR-10 and AR15 designs to Colt Manufacturing Company.

What is ar10 vs ar15?

The AR10

What is an ar10?

What is ar10. Source: rainierarms.com

The AR10 is a lightweight, air-cooled, gas operated 7.62mm (.308 in) assault rifle that fires the NATO standardized 7.62x51mm cartridge in 20-round detachable box magazine.

True to its name, the Armalite AR10 weighs between 3.29 to 4.05 kilograms (7.25 to 8.9 lbs) without ammunitions and magazine. Its lightness was due to the extensive use of aluminum alloy for its metal parts except for the steel barrel, bolt and bolt carrier, and glass reinforced plastic on the buttstock, handguard, and pistol grip.

Most gas-operated rifles bleeds the propellant gas to a port in the gun barrel to the piston in a cylinder running parallel to the gun barrel.

The gas then pushes the piston to enable the bolt to re-cock, release the spent cartridge, and load a fresh round to the chamber to make the gun ready for firing. The difference, however, of Stoner’s AR10 design lies in the fact that the propellant gas bleeds through a cylinder running in parallel with the gun barrel to impinge the bolt carrier mechanism.

This “direct gas impingement” gives the best AR10 a high cyclic rate of fire of 700 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 845 meters per second or 2,772 feet per second.

Externally, the AR10’s looks has become iconic due to its predecessor, the AR15 or specifically the M-16. The AR15 incorporates an elevated front sight and a carrying handle that houses the rear sights and acts a protection to the cocking/charging lever. Likewise, the AR-10 measures 1.029 meters (40 ½ inches) in overall length with a barrel length of 0.508 meters or 20 inches.

The AR15

What is ar15?

What is ar15? Source: rainierarms.com

Derived from the AR10, the AR15 uses the same “direct gas impingement” operation introduced in the AR10 and carries most developments as compared to its predecessor.

However, while the AR-10 is a “full-caliber” rifle, the AR15 is a lighter version of 5.56mm (0.223 in) caliber. The AR15/M16 uses the 5.56x45mm M193 cartridge in 20- or 30-round magazines. The AR15/M-16 extensively use the lightweight “nylonite” for its furniture, and can weigh from 2.2 to 3.9 kilograms or 5.5 to 8.5 lbs.

The “direct gas impingement” via rotating bolt operation gives the AR-15 a cyclic rate of fire of 800 rounds a minute with a muzzle velocity of 975 meters per second or 3,200 feet per second to a maximum effective range of 550 meters or 600 yards. The AR-15/M-16 has an overall length of 1.006 meters or 39.63 inches with a barrel length of 0.508 meters or 20 inches.

Pros and Cons of ar10 vs ar15

The AR10 vs AR15 has its own share of good and bad points.

One of the good points that both rifles share when compared with other contemporary designs of its time is lightness.

Due to this inherent lightness, it is possible to carry more ammunition with these two types of rifles. However, with the 7.62mm AR10 and 5.56mm AR15 cartridges, you can carry a lot more of the lighter rounds at any given weight.

While the 7.62mm round can outrange the 5.56mm round, the smaller projectile travels at much higher speeds than the bigger projectile.

Due to the higher mass of the AR10’s larger bullet, the projectile can store greater kinetic energy that can translate into stopping or knocking power.

On the other hand, the higher rate of fire that the AR15 imparts can translate into multiple hits. However, the term AR-10 and AR-15 applies only to single-shot and semi-automatic versions for civilian use.

Which Rifle is Better & Who Will Use It?

Which is better between ar10 vs ar15

Which is better between ar10 vs ar15. Source: gundigest.com

Both AR10 vs AR15 rifles attract the attentions of many gun collectors, hunters, sport shooters, and even law enforcers.

Both rifles are light enough to carry around even by women of small stature.

It is, however, the number of rounds needed to do a job that really matters.

For big game hunters, of course it is better to have a large caliber like 7.62mm rifle. It will be easier to use and necessitates less bullet to bring down a large game.

Law enforcers, especially snipers, need a 7.62mm AR10 with a best scope for ar 10 to have a good standoff range in order to cover a wider search area. AR10 has greater range than most 22 rifles.

AR15 is well suited for home protection, varmint and other small game hunting, and even security and public protection duties. A single-shot from a small caliber rifle is nothing new in enforcing security and public protection.

The Royal Ulster Police constables use the 5.56mm Ruger semi-automatic rifles during the IRA heydays in Northern Irish cities along with British infantry units armed with 7.62mm L1A1 semi-automatic rifles. The useful tips to hold the target is using a best shooting sticks.

What Parts Are Interchangeable Between Ar15 and Ar10

One common question with today’s tactical rifles is which parts are interchangeable between an AR-15 and an AR-10.

For starters, AR-15s and AR-10s are extremely similar weapons. They function in very similar ways, are built on similar frames and have some similar parts.

The primary difference between the two is that an AR-15 is bored in 5.56/.223 and an AR-10 is bored in 7.62/.308.

Are you looking to build a new AR frame weapon or looking to expand your arsenal and wondering which parts are the same?

We will take a look at some of the parts that are commonly interchangeable between AR-15s and AR-10s.

Keep in mind that this is a general list, and different firearms manufacturers may use slightly different parts, so there is no guarantee that every single part we list will be interchangeable between every single AR-15 and AR-10.

Here is the list of commonly interchangeable parts between the two.

1. Buttstock Assembly

The buffer tubes of AR-15s and AR-10s are commonly the same diameter, so the same buttstock assemblies can be used for both.

While this is a simple part, a quality buttstock assembly can improve your shooting and allow for more comfort.

2. Trigger Group

Despite the fact that the lowers of AR-15s and AR-10s are generally different sizes, because they are based on a very similar frame, trigger groups are generally interchangeable between the two.

The trigger group consists of the trigger, trigger spring, hammer, hammer spring, disconnector, and disconnector spring.

Mechanicaly, it is a simple mechanism, and can be used on both an AR-15 and an AR-10.

3, Buffer Detent and Spring

While it is a very small, seemingly insignificant part, the buffer detent and spring is interchangeable between AR-15s and AR-10s.

This small part holds the buffer of the weapon in place.

However, due to the differences in recoil, the buffer itself is not interchangeable.

4. Safety Selector

Yet another very small part, however, the importance of this part is unquestioned. The safety selector switch is generally the same in AR-15s and AR-10s, so this part is interchangeable.

5. Magazine Release Button and Spring

The magazine release button and spring is an interchangeable part, despite the fact that the magazine catch is different in an AR-15 and an AR-10.

6. Pistol Grip

As they are based on the same frame, AR-15s and AR-10s commonly have the same size pistol grip. An improved pistol grip will help some people shoot more accurately, and will generally be more comfortable.

Despite the fact that the AR-15 and AR-10 are extremely similar weapons, there are enough differences to prevent most parts from being interchangeable. These differences are generally a result of the different calibers, which require different size parts. Even though the weapons are so cosmetically similar, and function in the same way, the difference in size results in all around different parts.

This list gives you an idea of some of the parts that are interchangeable between ar10 vs ar15.

While most of these parts may seem insignificant, the trigger group specifically will make the most difference. An improved trigger group will help the average shooter, and is definitely worth upgrading.

Conclusions

At present, there is a significant growth in sales and market for commercial rifles and its accessories.

Due to the vast media coverage that the military enjoyed in the recent years, there has been a public clamor, not just for the rifle itself, but for tactical gadgets such as the red dot and reflex sights, scopes, laser spot, AN/PEQ tactical lights, combat grips, picatinny or tactical rails, bipods, and folding stocks. The market is overflowing with such items as upgrades to existing rifle. You can readily convert the looks of your old AR-10 or AR-15 into their military versions by simply replacing the old hand guard with picatinny rail and by adding the accessories you want. Most gun owners want to “militarize” their guns, not because they love the military, but for the sake of dressing the gun up.

For the ordinary people without any knowledge about guns and rifles, it is difficult to tell if the rifle is a military or a civilian version. Is that an M16 or an AR-15? Lastly, there are no regulations on “militarizing” the rifle’s appearance or looks. But in last, i think ar10 vs ar15 are also good gun.