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Red Dot Vs Magnified Scope. Which Is Better For Your Rifle?

One of the more common issues of discussion among frequent shooters is that of red dot vs scope, 

Red dot vs Scope

Red dot vs Scope

Many hunters wonder which one is better for what type of situation, and if there is ever a time when they should be partial to both.

Personally, I’m a big fan of modern technology when it comes to guns, so the red dot puts me in a sort of heaven.

But today we’ll look at the what red dot and scope are, and what are the differences between them.

What is a red dot, and what is a scope?

So what is the red dot?

Simply put, a red dot is like an optical illusion. Inside a tube or other enclosure on top of the gun, a red dot will be projected onto a screen.

This dot, which is sometimes a line, reticle, or other red honing notation of some kind, appears to be at the same distance as the target. The goal is two-fold:

  • Help the shooter identify the distance between him or herself and the target
  • Improve accuracy and eye line by focusing on the dot

What about a scope?

Contrast this with a scope, which is purely meant to magnify the target and increase the line of sight on it by the shooter.

There is no red line or marking of any kind, it’s basically the same as looking through a telescope, magnifying glass, or other optical funnel.

Here is a great video on the subject:

What are pros and cons of Red Dot and Scope?

Pros and cons of the red dot

There is a reason why red dot scopes have become so heavily used in the military and other high-pressure, intense situations. It is because in short range, rapid fire scenarios, the shooter can aim quicker, follow a moving target with more accuracy, and generally increase their odds of a hit.

The Rifle with Red Dot

The Rifle with Red Dot

The tube of light hits the concave glass lens. The light the shooter sees is the reflection of that light and for field situations, it really helps with accuracy and tracking.

I find that the red dots also help a lot with pinpointing an area on the target that I want to hit while the target is moving. Perhaps that’s because I can make the dot hit that spot for at least a brief second.

No matter the reason, I can’t get that perk with a scope or without using any magnification at all. I also like the ability to subtend either 2, 3, or 4 minutes at 100 years. I most often use the 2 minute option, but have found myself at 3 several times.

On the downside, red dots don’t help as much as a traditional scope with overall accuracy.

You’re also dealing with a battery that may cause issues. This isn’t going to be a problem for those shooters who are fanatical about maintenance and double checking that everything is ready to go before heading into the field.

But if you’re sloppy, you may be caught off guard with no dot when you need it most. Here is a video on using a red dot scope:

What about the Magnified optic scope

The biggest plus to using a scope instead of a red dot is that many of them have variable power settings, and can be adjusted much easier than the red dot devices.

The rifle with Magnified Scope

The rifle with Magnified Scope

Another plus is that the scope is more versatile for both close and long range shooting situations. The varied settings of the scope allow for easy adjustment to fit your specific circumstance.

The scope is, overall, better for accuracy and hit percentage.

On the negative side:

I seem to find it difficult to hit a target at the exact point I’m shooting for. While the scope brings the target into focus well, it does little to help shooters hit a precise point beyond making that point larger in their field of view.

Additionally, I find scopes to be harder to adjust my eyes to specifically because they don’t really do anything other than magnify and focus. I appreciate them holding zero, and am not trying to say I don’t find any value in magnified optic scopes. But for specific shooting in high-pressure situations, they fall behind.

Here is a video on how to sight your rifle scope.

Situational comparison between Red Dot and the Magnified Optics Scope

Let’s go over a couple of scenarios here and decide whether the red dot or the scope is better.

Scenario 1: Short range white tail hunte.

  • The short range gives to the red dot.
  • The quick movement and easy startling of the animal gives to the scope. This is close- I’ve noted red dots ability to move quickly, but because the accuracy is better overall with the scope, it wins this point
  • The ability to hit the body where you prefer gives a point to the red dot here
  • Overall winner: red dot

Scenario 2: long-range hunt or hunt of target at higher elevation than the shooter

  • Need for increase accuracy gives a point to the scope
  • The flying target or uphill moving target definitely goes to the red dot, because you can follow the part of the target that you wish to hit with a higher degree of precision
  • The parallax issue comes into play here as the target moves further away or changes elevation. The red dot, as long as it is in view, can stay over the target and reduce the effect of the parallax issue. Point to the red dot
  • Overall winner: red dot

Conclusion

Now, obviously there is a lot of my personal experience and opinion in this article.

Long-time scope users will come forward saying that the long-distance competition should have gone to the scope. They are correct assuming that their comfort level with the scope is much higher than with the red dot. Other than that, I fail to see how the scope would win.

Overall, I like the red dot much better because of the parallax issue and short distance accuracy. I keep good track of my battery power and other small details, so I never have any problems there.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this. Go ahead and throw your comments in the section down below, and please share on social media. Let’s get a good conversation going!

Mount Your Scope With 5 Best Ar Scope Mount For The Money In 2018

There are so many AR scope mounts available that it can be confusing to know which one to choose.

Best AR Scope Mount For The Money

Best AR Scope Mount For The Money

In my fifty years or more of hunting, I’ve tried a number of them, and today we’ll be discussing five budget-friendly options for scope mounts.

If you need assistance with accuracy, finding and holding zero, and a general improvement in your shooting, this article is for you. Here are the five best AR scope mounts.

Top Our Pick For Best AR Scope Mounts For The Money In 2017

Top 5 Best AR Scope Mount For The Money In 2017

This is my review about 5 best ar scope mount on the market, it will help you find the best for hunting. Check out it:

1. CCOP High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 1-Inch, Black

CCOP High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 1-Inch, Black

1-Inch Ar Scope Mount- CCOP High Profile AR-ArmourTac

I’ve used this scope on my Bushnell 3-9x40 for many years because it is the best AR scope mount on the market.

Before, I was having issues with dealing with wobbly scope mounts that actually hindered my line of sight instead of helped.

This scope is securely fastened on top of the gun and never shakes. I’ve hit targets from 180 yards or more many times and it’s a breeze.

I have heard tell of this scope mount cracking, but that is generally a result of improper securement.

If you know what you’re doing, you can use Loctite on the screws and shouldn’t have any issues.

When secured well, you’ll be able to hold zero with no effort and greatly improve accuracy both at the range and out in the field.

Tight securement and consistency are what makes this one of the best AR scope mounts.

2. CCOP MNT-1516 High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 30m

CCOP MNT-1516 High Profile AR-ArmourTac Rifle Scope Mount Rings for Picatinny Rail, 30mm

Best 30mm Scope Mount- 1516 High Profile Ar Scope Mount-

Another solid option for a 30-mm rifle scope.

If you’ve had problems in the past with cracked scopes, this is a great solution because the aluminum alloy is strong enough to handle strong recoil.

The downside to this is that this scope is heavier than many of the more expensive ones. Even with a lot of pushback, this rifle scope holds zero securely as long as you use higher quality screws.

I don’t like the ones that come standard, and recommend upgrading to avoid them being stripped.

3. Burris 410341 AR PEPR 30-mm Scope Mount (Black)

Burris 410341 AR PEPR 30-mm Scope Mount (Black)

30 mm Scope Mount for Ar- Burris 410341

Versatility is the name of the game with this one, the best AR scope mount from Burris.

For any shooters struggling to find the right scope mount for a variety of angles, this one comes in three sizes (1 inch, 30 mm, and 34mm).

You can have the same scope mount on different size guns and always enter the field feeling comfortable in your ability to hold zero across multiple options.

I prefer the Picatinny top because that’s what I’ve been shooting with for many years, but my nephew is on board with the smooth mount and has no problems nailing targets at 150 yards or more.

There are two nuts keeping the mount on the rail and they aren’t going to strip on you.

While that’s a worry with many other low budget mounts, I haven’t heard any tale of that happening with the Burris.

To further the versatility, this scope gives users the ability to mount on a variety of models and sizes, up to 50 mm without too much pressure on the piece.

This scope is best for shooters who spend most of their time at the range instead of in the field because of its weight

4. American Defense AD-RECON STD Riflescope Optic Mount

American Defense AD-RECON STD Riflescope Optic Mount (Black, 30 mm)

30m Ar Scope Mount -American Defense AD-RECON STD

This one speaks to the heart of the true American. The biggest benefit I’ve noticed is the AD-RECON mounts are the best in the industry. Heavy recoil will never be a problem for anyone using this mount.

If you’re shooting with a 1-6x24 scope or something similar, the weight of this mount shouldn’t offset the benefits. This holds true when hiking into the field.

The one thing to do on the side is to get ahold of some Loctite and use it for the screws.

I haven’t seen any stripping issues but for security, it will ensure no issues when in a high-pressure situation. All repositioning can be done by hand if you don’t have a screwdriver or tools.

The floating ring setup is impactful for the heavy hunter and helps separate American Defenseman from other best AR scope mounts on the market. Overall, this is the second best option on this list

5. Accushot UTG High Profile Picatinny/Weaver Rings (1-Inch, 2-Piece)

Accushot UTG High Profile Picatinny/Weaver Rings (1-Inch, 2-Piece)

1 Inch Ar Scope Mount Accushot UTG High Profile Picatinny/Weaver Rings

The two-piece AR scope mount set here is the best value.

If you struggle with recoil issues, these Accushot UTGs will help you hold the gun securely so that you’re firing doesn’t impact accuracy. I also really like their assistance with holding zero.

The flexibility offered by a multi-piece mounting setup with these as a part of it will help accuracy at the range or in the field.

These scope rings perform well as Picatinny/Weaver and any other setup you need high-impact, low budget scope rings to grow your game. Obtaining these scopes online makes them even more wallet friendly.

I set them up in about two minutes on my 20 gauge slug and did it all by hand. Those of you needing simple rings, here is your answer.

Head-to-head comparison

Two of the options here stand out as the best AR scope mounts: The CCOP High-Profile AR Armour Tac and the Burris 410341.

The CCOP is the one I have the most experience with. I turned to their scope mount to solve recoil issues I was having with the previous one.

Since the switch, I’ve had no issues whatsoever.

My first use of the Burris AR scope came about two years ago when I bought a new shotgun that the CCOP wouldn’t fit, at least not in a way that made me comfortable.

I’ve taken it on three hunting trips and love the sturdiness, ease of holding zero, and accuracy at 200 yards. To pick between the two, I encourage you to purchase the Burris 410341 as the best AR scope mount on the market.

Conclusion

If this article proves anything, it’s that you don’t have to spend big on AR scope mounts. These options are well-rounded, each with its pros and cons.

Ultimately, my field experience led me to the Burris and CCOP options that I’ve grown accustomed to. I’ve gotten both my son and brother on board as well.

I encourage you to do the same. If you enjoyed this review, please share on social media and add your thoughts in the comments below. If there is one that needs to be added to the list, let us know!

What Are The Best Shotgun Scope For Deer Hunting 2018

What is the best shotgun scope available on the entry-level market right now?

There are a number of them, and most of them essentially get the job done the same way.

best shotgun scope for hunting

best shotgun scope for hunting

It is important to identify whether the shotgun scope you are looking to buy is going to solve your personal problems, such as increasing the line of vision, improving accuracy, or making the transition from the range into the hunting field.

The best shotgun scope for you depends on three factors:

  • What type of hunter you are, and your experience level
  • Whether you’re shooting long range
  • How important it is to you to have the top measurements in all categories

Let’s take a look at the best shotgun scope in those three categories: Shotgun Scope for the gear nerd needing top measurements/ for the experienced hunter/ and Shogun Scope for solving the problems of the everyday hunter

Top Our Pick For Best Shotgun Scopes For Hunting In 2017

Top 3 Best Shotgun Scopes On The Market 2017

This is my review about 3 shotgun scope on the market, it will help you find the best for hunting. Check out it:

1. Nikon ProStaff Shotgun Hunter 2-7 x 32 Black Matte Riflescope(BDC 200)

Nikon ProStaff Shotgun Hunter 2-7 x 32 Black Matte Riflescope(BDC 200)

Best shotgun scope for the gear nerd needing top measurements

Shotgun Scope for the gear nerd needing top measurements:

This rifle scope boasts a higher magnification rate (up to 7x) than the other scopes here, along with and decent eye relief (3.8 inches).

If you frequently have problems zeroing in on your targets, this is the best rifle scope for you because the combination of the eye relief and mag rate bring targets into focus from as far as 300 yards.

Pretty impressive slug accuracy, and honing in on the center of the target was a breeze

Additionally, this is a great rifle scope for shooters traditionally accustomed to range shooting but looking to step up their field game. Moving targets are brought into focus and remain there.

I really found that this scope helped me learn how to move my gun across the field of view without a quiver or shake. It really makes it easy to have confidence in your shots. I recommend pairing the Nikon ProStaff with a Mossberg or Remington.

For situational shooting, this scope will help with:

  • Hi low mounts. No problems with clearance or mounting, you’d think this scope was developed by the gun manufacturer

  • 200 yard or higher moving targets. If you use the gun for long-range shots, this scope will be the best of the entry-level class for yo

  • Those needing a sniper version of a good, reasonable scope or the shotgun version. The Nikon ProStaff is seamlessly consistent across both platforms, perfect for those trying out a new way of shooting

2. Bushnell Trophy Shotgun Scope with Circle-X Reticle, 1.75-4 x 32mm, Matte Black

Bushnell Trophy Shotgun Scope with Circle-X Reticle

Best shotgun scope for the experienced hunter

Best Shotgun Scope for the experienced hunter

The best shotgun scope for those already bringing a level of confidence to the table is this one.

The Bushnell Trophy falls behind the Nikon ProStaff in magnification up to 4x and eye relief (3.5 inches), but not far enough that a confident shooter won’t be able to hit their target. If you are looking for a scope that focuses extremely fast as the top priority, this is the best scope for you

Bushnell really focused on the windage issue with this scope.

Mounting and elevation are secure and consistent across different guns, as you’ll find that hi low mounts typical among entry-level scopes will do the job. Get 1 inch rings and a mounting rail.

If you hunt in foggy or otherwise non-optimal conditions, or at altitude or across widely varying different seasons, this scope will give you a consistent line of sight. It’s versatile. You’ll never find yourself searching for a wipe or needing to remount in a situation where the scope should have performed

  • During the golden hour (either morning or evening), the light transmission is fantastic. You’ll have the best vision of the season

  • Sluggers find consistency across the board. The reticle is best in class
  • It isn’t as versatile as the Nikon ProStaff. Experienced shooters will have to use their skills to make up for the reduced magnification

3. Simmons 517793 Prodiamond Shotgun Prohunter Riflescope (4x32, Matte)

Simmons 517793 Prodiamond Shotgun Prohunter Riflescope

Shotgun Scope for solving the problems of the everyday hunter

Shogun Scope for solving the problems of the everyday hunter

While the magnification (4x) is not a speck above standard, Simmons outdoes itself with the 4 inches of eye relief. Coupled with that is the Quick Target Acquisition, making this scope a great option for beginners and regular shooters.

The imagery is good for hunters of moving targets, especially deer, turkey, and others than tend to bounce as they trot. So this scope is perfect for deerhunting.

For newer shooters, the windage issue isn’t really a problem with the Simmons. It is the best shotgun scope for them because the elevation adjustment system isn’t going to budge, no matter the weather condition or season.

I like how easily it mounts onto my 870 remington shotgun. The one issue I have heard about with this scope is hard recoil. I recommend shooters to really fasten the scope securely and double check that everything is lined up right.

Most younger shooters that aren’t able to suck up the recoil as naturally may see problems if shooting many 3030s or similar rounds. But for less recoil, this scope will serve just fine

  • ​Perfect for short range hunting. You won’t find a better scope at 75 or fewer yards

  • Improves accuracy greatly, another reason why it’s best for beginners. This is the one scope on this list that really accentuates the ‘entry-level’ moniker

  • Light is collected and displayed really well. Perfect for twilight and early morning

Finding their niche

The best shotgun scopes on the market are all sufficient at basic daily hunting and range shooting.

Where they differ comes down to the slight intricacies of the manufacturer and how the scopes handle themselves once mounted.

You experienced shooters should go with the Bushnell Trophy Shotgun Scope, while I strongly recommend the Simmons scope for anyone who hasn’t used a scope before or is new to shooting. It is the most basic of the three

Conclusion

Overall, the best shotgun scope in this entry-level class is the Nikon ProStaff Shotgun Hunter. It’s versatility, high level of magnification, and ease of use make it a no contest for those not willing to break the bank on their shotgun scope.
Mount it securely and do a test run at the range before bringing it into field, and you will find a pleasant, replicable experience each time you hunt – no matter the location or time. If you have enjoyed this article, please share on social media so that we can get more hunters to put thought into their scope selection.

If you are using a shotgun, Please consider buy the best gun safe for the money to storage it.

Feel free to leave a comment – I’d love to get a conversation going

SP101 And GP100 Ruger- Which Is Better For Personal Protection?

Which pistol to carry for defense purposes is an important question. Over the years, I’ve switched between a number of different guns for carry purposes and to use at the range.

Two of them have stood out above the others as the most appropriate for general carry – the SP101 and the gp100 Ruger.

sp101 vs gp100 ruger

sp101 vs gp100 ruger

I spent about ten years with an SP101 type model after it came to market in 1989 before recently switching to the GP100.

Today, I’ll tell you what I liked and didn’t like about both and we’ll compare the SP101 vs gp100 Ruger. Let’s get started.

The breakdown

The SP101 maintains the feel and functionality of classic concealed carry guns. It’s small, in the featherweight class, and easy to draw. 

  • The best thing about it in this case is that the gun handles like a high-performance weapon. It’s powerful, relatively easy to aim and shoot, and certainly is tough to detect before you draw
  • It comes as a 5-shot, 6-shot, or 8-shot
  • It has a strong recoil, though, and it does take a moment to position yourself before shooting. Those action shots in the movies where the character runs while drawing and shooting aren’t really that realistic with the SP101 – in actuality, there’s a good amount of kick and continuing to run in a straight line would be near impossible

The GP100 is actually a modernized version of what was known as the Security Six. Physically, the newer model is much cleaner and fires better. It is highly preferable to me in day-to-day situations. I keep urging my wife to get one too, because she is now jealous of mine. 

  • It has a comfortable feel to it and is certainly a featherweight at 2.2 pounds. It is popular with a handful of law enforcement departments around the world because of its versatility
  • Depending on the catalog number, this gun handles anything from the .357 Magnum to a .44 Special. It’s got a wide range of caliber fittings and barrel lengths, coming as a 5-shot, 6-shot, 7-shot, or 10-shot.
  • I’m not as big of a fan of the after-market support and add-ons for the GP100, this is one thing I really do love about the SP101.

Which is better for personal protection GP101 or SP101?

In short, the GP100 is a better gun for concealed carry and personal protection. The gun itself is an evolution of previous hand-held revolvers, marking an improvement upon them, and it has been modified even since as it fits different caliber and barrel lengths. The gun is more versatile and can be better fitted to your personal preferences.

I find it more comfortable in concealed mode, in fact I hardly even notice that it is there. I love .357 Magnums, and the flow of this gun throughout the loading and shooting process is very smooth.

The SP101 is more of a heavy-duty type small revolver. Over the years, it’s been used by police departments as a quick-grab backup weapon, and is designed for situations where it will be used by a highly trained professional.

I used it quite a bit at the range to get a good feel, and I’ve got to say that I was able to feel comfortable with the GP100 much faster than the SP101.

They are both great guns. But let’s say that you are carrying a gun for the instance when a bad guy pops out of nowhere and you (as a common citizen, not a police officer) have to react quickly and depend on your gun to perform every time. The GP100 is easier to handle and easier to shoot.

Amenities, action, and sights: Oh my!

Both of these handguns come in multiple versions, barrel lengths, and caliber, fit to taste.

What I really like about the GP100 is the shot capacity and variety of calibers. Almost all, with the exception of the GPF-840 and the 1757, are full shroud, which is a huge plus for me. I prefer one of the variations with adjustable sights, because I’m old school and like to try out many different options before settling on my emergency go-to.

Ruger GP 100 Match Champion (.357 Magnum)

Ruger GP 100 Match Champion (.357 Magnum). Image from hickok45

The SP101 is a bit heavier than many other revolvers (not enough to cause a major disturbance, but if weight is your biggest factor, this is another reason to go with the GP 100). This gun does have a smooth double action, along with a bobbed hammer, two things I really like and that kept it at my waist for nearly ten years. It offers large, high-visibility sights, which I also loved. However, during rapid fire, I found I had a harder time tracking the sights than I have with the GP100.

Ruger SP101 .357 Magnum. Image from hickok45

Scorecard

As a review, let’s take a look at the points each gun has in its category here at the end of the comparison:

GP100

  • More options for customization
  • Better sight tracking during rapid fire
  • Variety of calibers is a big plus
  • Shot capacity is a big plus
  • Definite proof that it has gotten better over the years

SP101

  • Better after-market support and add-ons.
  • Smooth double action and bobbed hammer making the shooting fun and painless.
  • Very consistent, but with a higher recoil issue and (I felt) tougher to master.

Conclusion

Both the GP100 and the SP101 are fine small size revolvers to keep by your side in concealed carry mode.

Both can get the job the done.

But what has really drawn me to switch from the SP101 to the GP100 is the ease of comfortability I felt when learning the gun that was new to me. It takes a lot to get an old timer like me to change his ways, but the GP100 is the best revolver I have ever shot. I’ll keep it by my side until I die.

If you have enjoyed this article, please share on social media. I’d love to see how far we can push the word of the GP100. Feel free to leave comments below, let’s get a discussion going!. Oh one thing, if you need the gun safe for this ruger gun, you can take a look my post about best handgun safe for the money

What Is The Different Between Rimfire vs Centerfire?

One of the more common questions asked by new shooters is this: what is the difference between rimfire vs. centerfire?

And, beyond that, why should I choose one over the other? Today we are going to dissect these two types of ammo and determine which one is better for your specific situation.

I personally prefer centerfire based on my shooting style, technique, and hobbies, but there are still small-cartridge situations where rimfire is better. Let’s take a look.

what is the different between Rimfire vs Centerfire

what is the different between Rimfire vs Centerfire

Rimfire vs. Centerfire: What the hell are they?

Rimfire and centerfire refer to the categories of primer ignition systems, basically, what gets the whole process of firing the bullet going.

The explosion caused by the lighting of the primer causes the gunpowder to react and project the bullet forward out of the barrel of the gun. Every single time a gun is fired, this is what happens, regardless of whether a rimfire or centerfire cartridge is being used.

With centerfire cartridges, the explosion is concentrated more centrally in the middle of the cartridge. This creates a more consistent firing of the bullet. Because of this increase in performance, the professionals in the police and military are preferring centerfire cartridges.

Rimfire cartridges see the explosion overtaking more of the cartridge as it is tripped at the rim. The pressure on the bullet isn’t as concentrated on the center of it, and I’ve heard tale of rimfire cartridges not firing with the power of their centerfire counterparts.

Rimfire vs Centerfire: How to they work?

Centerfire cartridges locate the primer in the center of the cartridge case head. These are much more common these days as cartridge size preference trends towards larger sizes. You really won’t find anything other than centerfire cartridges in larger or even medium sizes these days.

The move towards centerfire cartridges is based largely on the fact that they are more reliable in heavy duty situations. Police, military, and serious hunters and shooters have pretty much switched entirely to centerfire cartridges based on their dependability, consistency, and reliability.

Because of this, and because of the fact that so many shooters want to emulate the pros, most shops will stock a wide variety of centerfire cartridges while only stocking a minimal amount of rimfire cartridges.

Rimfire cartridges are pretty much a thing of the past, except for certain gun models. A rimfire cartridge works like this: the firing pin ignites the primer by striking the cartridge’s rim, causing friction and igniting the blast.

What is the difference between Rimfire vs Centerfire?

Basically, the difference starts with the power issues that we’ve discussed above. Rimfire cartridges are cheaper, for sure, and have lower recoil than centerfire cartridges.

One of the biggest drawbacks of rimfire cartridges is how hard they are to find. The older guys that I grew up with have been buying all the stock they can for fear of it no longer being available anywhere that they shop. As a result of this, hardly any new shooters are using rimfire cartridges.

Centerfire cartridges have higher recoil and are more expensive. But, because they are so widely available and there is no fear of them all being bought out or discontinued, the market price will probably eventually drop significantly just based on supply and demand.

So what is the better between Rimfire vs Centerfire?

I highly urge you, even if you are a long-time shooter, to make the switch to centerfire cartridges. The long term sustainability is much better and you’ll find that you spend less money over time because of:

  • Availability
  • Higher amounts of fittings
  • More ability to share and match with other shooters

Who fits rimfire cartridges and who fits centerfire cartridges?

Rimfire cartridges are certainly not as prominent as they once were. Right now, 17 caliber and .22 caliber pistol and rifle cartridges can be found in rimfire variety, along with some shotgun cartridges that are small-bore.

You won’t find any game hunting cartridges using rimfire anymore. Beyond that, mostly just collectors’ items will fit rimfire cartridges. .22LR are the most frequently used rimfire cartridge fittings. You’ll also see them in WMR, Winchester Magnum, Hornady Mach 2, and Hornady Magnum. Not a ton of variety offered here!

For today’s pistol, rifle, and shotgun ammunition, most of what is commonly used will be centerfire. If you are looking for a specific rimfire cartridge, your best bet is going to be to shop online on a store’s website first before visiting in person just to make sure that they will stock it before you head out.

Conclusion

I hope you have gained a solid understanding of the differences between rimfire and centerfire cartridges.

Centerfire is the way of the future. Rimfire will likely continue on its slow and miserable decline.

What the high-impact shooters of the world prefer is what goes, and you’ll be better off siding with them. I started using centerfire cartridges years ago because I predicted this trend after spending years in the military serving my country.

If you have enjoyed this article, please share on social media so that we can increase awareness of the differences between rimfire and centerfire cartridges and get more people switched over.

Feel free to share your comments in the section below and we’ll get a conversation going. Take care!

7 Frequently Question You Need To Know About Rifle Scope?

So you’re thinking about buying a rifle scope. You’ve decided that you need increased visibility when out in the field, making your gun that much more effective.

unlimited guide about rifle scope

Unlimited guide about rifle scope

This is your guide all about rifle scopes, how to use them, how to measure them, and how to read the measurements.

I’ve been using rifle scopes for years, and have tried many low and high power scopes. These days, I prefer the lower power scopes whenever they are applicable. Let’s take a look at what rifle scopes can do for you.

In this post, we will help you find the answer for 7 question about rifle scope:​ (use quick navigation to jump to answer)

  • 1. Type of rifle scope
  • 2. How does a Rifle Scope work
  • 3. How are Rifle Scope Measured?
  • 4. What do the numbers on a rifle scope signify?
  • 5. Best times for Hight and Low Power rifle scope
  • 6. What is the magnification? And how to read Scope Magnification?
  • 7. How much Scope Manification do I need?

1. Types Of Rifle Scopes

Rifle scopes are meant to provide magnification on the rifle where a gun sight can’t, which is the main difference between the two.

Rifle scopes are distinguished by how they help the shooter hone in on their target, and typically fall into one of the following categories:

  • Aperture sights require the shooter to set the front sight in line with the ring during the aiming process. The rear sight is typically a ring
  • Open sights are similar in that the shooter must line of front and rear sights. However, instead of a ring for the rear sight, it appears as looking like the letter “V.”
  • Dotted and laser sights help the shooter aim by pointing directly to the target with a noted mark. Red dot sights show a red dot on the target without actually sending any light out of the scope, making them ideal for hunting while maintaining camouflage. Laser sights actually project the image onto the target via laser

2. How Does A Rifle Scope Work?

Rifle scopes are elongated spaces for magnification lenses.

Their overall goal is to increase the line of sight on a shooter’s target through the magnification, and they work kind of a like high-tech magnifying glass. The central part of the rifle scope is called the main tube. This part holds the magnifying lenses that actually make the scope function properly. They also typically have some type of reticle for noting the point of impact of a bullet on the target.

How Does A Rifle Scope Work

How Does A Rifle Scope Work

Rifle scopes are attached to the top of the rifle and have an erector tube working between the reticle and adjustment knobs. This is how the scope adjusts its views, as the tube is moved back and forth by the shooter by the knobs. The shooter can zoom in on the target to their preference, finalize their aim, and take the shot. The eyepiece of the rifle scope is called the ocular assembly. The diopter here brings the shooter’s line of sight into focus, which is adjusted by the knobs. This all sounds very technical, but it basically operates like a telescope. The image, in this case the target, is fetched by the scope and brought into focus by the rest of the components. In the end, the shooter has much better visibility and a result, improved accuracy. Rifle scopes are preferable for long range shooting both in the field and at practice ranges

This video Airsoft GI talk about how does a rifle scope work: ​

3. What Do The Numbers Mean On A Rifle Scope?

One of Best Scopes For Ruger 10/22

One of Best Scopes For Ruger 10/22

This is where rifle scopes can be quite confusing. Because of their different parts, the scope improves the shooter’s line of sight in multiple ways.

Those ways are reflected in the measurement equation.

The measurement of rifle scopes is broken down into segments that basically translate a math equation.

The first number of note is the first digit, which depicts the level of magnification the scope presents.

So if a scope begins with the number “3”, that means that the target appears 3 times closer than it would without the scope.

The next digit is a dash, followed by a number representing ‘power.’ So if the number is 6, the power of the scope brings the target into focus appearing six times closer to the shooter than it would without a scope.

You’ll then have an ‘X’ followed by a number such as ’40.’ This last number refers to the diameter of the scope as measured in millimeters. Written out completely, this expression would read 3-6x40. Now you know what all those numbers mean!

For another example: In a 3-9X40 scope, the 3 means 3 power, or 3X. Clearly, this means that the image you see through the scope appears three times (3X) closer than it does with your naked eye. The 9 means nine power, or nine times (9X) closer than it appears with your naked eye. The (40) in this number is the objective lens diameter in millimeters. This is a variable scope because you can vary the magnification of the scope from 3 to 9, stopping anywhere in between. You would describe this scope as a "three to nine by forty." Some scopes have a 3x magnification range such as a 3-9. Some have 4 or more as in a 4-12. . The larger the magnification range the more you will pay, but it makes for a more versatile scope. I've been spoiled by them.​

4. Best Times For High And Low Power Rifle Scope

There are different scopes for different hunting situations. Shooters will want a lower power scope, in most circumstances, for short range shooting.

Low power scopes are dialed down to their lowest magnification level possible, which helps to keep targets in focus that aren’t very far away. Police and armed military personnel often prefer low power scopes in typical day-to-day situations where they aren’t going to fire at targets that are hundreds of feet away.

High power rifle scopes are ideal for long-range shooting. They have the ability to, through multiple levels of magnification, increase the size of a target while making it appear to be closer than it actually is.

This gives the shooter the ability to not only have an easier time aiming at their target, but to pinpoint the exact area that they want to shoot. For example, the right side versus the left side, or a shoulder shot, etc.

5. What Is The Magnification? And How To Read Scope Magnification?

As we’ve stated here, the best way to read lens magnification is to determine how amplified you want your vision of the target to be.

What Is The Magnification And How To Read Scope Magnification

What Is The Magnification And How To Read Scope Magnification

If you want the target to appear closer and also be bigger in your eye, focus on the entire sequence of numbers used to describe the rifle scope. Is the scope going to provide 3 levels of magnification, making the target highly visible from hundreds of yards away?

You’ll notice that the when reading lens magnification, the factors multiple each other. This is because they each complement the work of the other to provide a better shot.

Making a target appear larger while also making it appear closer provides more assistance to the hunter than simply zooming in on its head.

Read the listing like you read the description of your gun. 3-9x40 equals 3 times magniciation, 9 times closer to the shooter, all viewed through a lens that is 40 millimeters in diameter.

6. How Much Scope Magnification Do I Need?

The level of scope magnification needed depends mostly on how far away the target is going to be. For closer targets, you’ll want a low power rifle scope that doesn’t severely alter the perception of the target. It allows the target to appear mostly as it is, with slight enhancements to hone in on exactly where you want to shoot it.

You’ll want to increase the levels of magnification in line with targets getting further and further away, or if the targets are incredibly small. Smaller targets need the amplification that makes them appear to be bigger than they are, allowing you to specifically shoot where you want to hit the target.

7. How Are Rifle Scopes Measured?

Rifle scopes are measured by how many times greater one’s vision and is of their target compared to what it would be with the naked eye. Levels of magnification are determined in comparison to the average person’s eyesight.

You may have a scope that improves the size of the image by 3 times, while making it appear 6 times closer to you than it actually is. You may have a scope that is 40 millimeters in diameter, or it may be bigger or smaller. In total, rifle scopes are measured by magnification and size, and depicted in the written form we’ll go over next.

Conclusion

Rifle scopes have completely changed the game for shooters. Low power scopes seem to be rising in popularity these days as hunters realize that having more power than they need in terms of eyesight isn’t always a good thing.

Sometimes, it’s best to just go with instincts instead of overdoing it with extras. I hope you have found this post helpful – if so, please share on social media and feel free to comment below. Ideas and experiences are the stepping stones of progression. The more people we get talking, the better our hunting skills will be!

Which Is Better Between .308 Winchester And 6.5 Creedmoor?

You want to know which is better between .308 Winchester and 6.5 Creedmoor?

There has been much talk lately about the performance of the .308 Winchester versus the 6.5 Creedmoor. In my opinion, the 6.5 Creedmoor is a better cartridge overall. This is because of its ballistic capabilities and the fact that it is slightly smaller than the .308.

I happen to be fond of the little red tip as well, which is not present on the .308. In this article I’m going to show you why the 6.5 Creedmoor is the superior option, and why you should look for it to play an increasingly large role in the market, in everything from store shelf presence to gun fitting, going forward.

6.5-creedmoor-vs-308-winchester

Which is better between 6.5 creedmoor vs 308 winchester

Overall Performance

When shooting, both cartridges perform well and are effective for hunting and target shooting at the range. But for medium to long range shooting, the 6.5 Creedmoor is much better because it uses slightly skinnier bullets that make it down range at a faster rate of speed than the other, and I’ve seen multiple times this have a direct impact on accuracy.

The .308 just can’t quite keep up on shots over 700 yards is what I’ve noticed. The longer the shot, the bigger the difference there is between the two cartridges. The .308 Winchester is incredibly well-known in the shooting world. Pretty much everyone has experience with them.

If you’re going for something easy that is simple to get opinions on, fit to a gun, ammo for, or anything else, this is the winner here. But once we start to look a little deeper into the two cartridge types, some major points begin to rise. The 6.5 Creedmoor is a better cartridge, plain and simple. For long range shooting, for accuracy, for speed. Dare I say, even for consistency with loading and gun powder?

What About Build Of .308 Winchester and 6.5 Creedmoor.

The shoulder is sharper on the 6.5 Creedmoor. This also factors into accuracy. If you spend a significant amount of time out in the field with both cartridges, you’ll notice that the brass lasts longer in the Creedmoor. The Creedmoor is based on a .30 TC Case, unlike the .308.

I do have to give the .308 credit for its consistency, however. Every time I’ve used it, or been hunting with someone who is, I feel like I know what to expect with each shot, from load to follow through. When I start getting carried away distance-wise with the 6.5 Creedmoor, I frequently notice some variabilities in the overall feel of the shot. This is particularly true when loading.

The case itself, on both options, is incredibly sturdy. They’ll be dependable whenever you need them and are worth the money. I don’t want to make it seem like I hate the .308 Winchester. I just think that it has had its time, and over the last ten years or more we’ve started to see the rise of a superior option. Particularly for distance accuracy, as I’ll note repeatedly.

I’ll give the .308 the edge for range shooting. It’s more consistent on shorter to mid-range shots and can be used in more guns. And because just about everyone has experience with them, these cartridges are easy to find bullets for and an expert to assist you with loading or anything else that you need help with.

Shooting

The rising popularity of 6.5 mm cartridges is ensuring that shops will have more and more selections for the Creedmoor when it comes to bullets. Your choice of shot should be largely based on case outline. Again, the 6.5 Creedmoor is the winner here, particularly because as it grows in popularity, more options become available. Both cartridges will suffice just fine in the field. But if you’re hunting with someone using the other, you will notice differences over time.

The 170+ grain measure of the .308 struggles with magazine limitations. I also seem to have better luck with the Creedmoor when it comes to powder. It shoots at a higher speed: a 140-grain shot sees 2710 fps with a superior BC of .526-.535. You ain’t going to get that with the .308!

The 6.5 Creedmoor has less recoil because it fires lighter bullets, making the shots easier on you over time. The .308 is the winner on the lifespan of the barrel, due to the fact that that the .605 has a smaller bore and shoots at higher speeds. It does tend to wear the barrel out.

If you are finding the safe for you gun, don’t hesitate to read the best gun safe for the money to choose the good one

Versatility of 6.5 creedmoor and 308 winchester

If you’re using a bolt action style rifle, .308 will be more apt to work with your gun. Obviously, this depends on what you’re using. But as the 6.5 Creedmoor becomes more popular, more rifle makers have started to make options that will accommodate. I’ve heard hunters say that .308 ammo is cheaper and more available (see video below), but this is going to be less and less of a problem as time moves along.

Since the 6.5 jumped into the spotlight, it has slowly gained momentum and traction. It’s versatility has increased in tune with that. Will it ever surpass the .308 Winchester in popularity? Probably not. Old hacks like me are stuck in our ways, in fact I’m one of the more progressive hunting types in my crew and the only one that currently prefers the 6.5 Creedmoor.

 

The Verdict About 6.5 Creedmoor vs 308 Winchester

As I’m sure I’ve made very clear throughout this article, I prefer the 6.5 Creedmoor over the .308 Winchester. It’s a better cartridge because of improved accuracy and spotting, particularly in long range shooting. The .308 is the stuff of legend are lore these days, but sometimes its best that a legend passes the torch.

Down the line, the 6.5 Creedmoor will be increasingly fitted and common to more shooters’ tastes and hopefully we can wake up the rest to its superiority. And in my opinion, 6.5 Creedmoor is best ammo for an AR 10 rifle.

If you enjoyed this article, please share on social media so that we can get the good word out! Perthaps you’re an old .308 guru – throw a comment down below and let’s get a conversation going.

How To Move A Gun Safe. Best Way You Need To Know

It’s that dreaded moment. The time when you have to move a gun safe from one place to another. Gun safes are notoriously heavy and difficult to move, much like that furniture you inherited from Grandma. Everything about the process basically sucks, but it is doable. Follow this simple series of steps on how to move a gun safe and you’ll have that thing in its new location in no time.

How to move a gun safe

How to move a gun safe

Initial steps

Get the safe as light as possible by removing anything that doesn’t need to be inside. Ammo, anything else that can be put in a separate box for now, should be taken out. If moving to a new house, park the moving truck with the rear facing either the sidewalk or driveway that you will be approaching from. Lower the ramp and be sure the path to get to the truck is made as easy as possible.

For larger safes, provide the team with worker gloves if they don’t already have some. I also find it helpful to provide pizza and beer to those that help me move – it seems to get everyone in a better mood and creates a team atmosphere. Here is a great video.

  • Cover walls, door openings, other furniture, and important items with scratch resistant material. Anything that the safe will pass by in the home should be protected.
  • Clear the path with which the safe will travel to an extra foot on each side, wherever possible. A bit of wobbling and curving will likely occur during transport. You don’t want anything to be struck by the safe should it or your team become frenzied.
  • Get a plank of wood or other solid object to act as a ramp if there are any steps leading from the front door to the vehicle or other area where the safe will be. If this doesn’t seem doable, you’ll need a couple extra people on the lower side as you move the safe down the step.

Moving larger gun safes (over 3 feet tall, too heavy for one person to lift)

Gun safes are heavy in order to make them near impossible to steal should someone intrude into your home. Moving them about is intentionally a process. I moved my 800-pound gun safe from our old house in Naples, Florida to our new spot in Lyndon, Washington and learned the hard way that gun safes aren’t the most transportable of items. We spent an extra grand on gas on the drive because of the added weight. However, I picked up these tips:

  • Get a furniture dolly, or a forklift if you can. I recommend buying one from a home improvement store instead of renting or borrowing one. That way, you’ll have it whenever you need it.
  • When you’re ready to move, have a team of people stand on one side of the safe and lean it back. Slide the dolly underneath the safe and stabilize.
    • I’ll note here that it is super important that the safe be balanced well on the dolly. Due to immense weight, it can fall over and crush individuals if not properly set. Here is a video on the process.
  • Ensure your path is cleared, and begin slowly moving the best gun safe out of the room.

Corners and Immoveable Objects in the way

Going around corners can be tough. The most important thing is to remain calm and proceed slowly. If you can, have a person position themselves on the far side of the safe (the side opposing the direction you are turning into) to provide added support from the back side. This person can forcefully push into the rear as the safe is moved around the corner. Go wide – by this I mean swing the dolly a bit further out than you initially think is necessary. That will allow the safe and dolly to be turned at an easier angle without striking the wall or toppling onto the person guarding the rear.

Loading into moving trucks/vehicles

Ready to exert some strength? Good, because this is the time to show off how those gym sessions have sculpted your muscles.

  • Assemble the entire team (add a few extra people if you can) at the bottom of the ramp leading into the back of the truck.
  • Everyone will need to position themselves comfortable behind the safe. If you have any truck straps, this is a great time to tie them around the safe and have one person stand in front of the safe and pull while everyone else pushes. While pulling won’t be super effective, the main benefit here is that this person acts as a sort of guide to ensure the safe doesn’t derail or fall off the dolly.
  • Once you start pushing the safe up the ramp, DON’T STOP! Momentum is the most important factor here. Get those grunts out and keep pushing. By the time you reach the top of the ladder, you will have enough momentum to easily move the gun safe into the desired position inside the truck.

Moving smaller gun safes

With smaller ones, the process of how to move a gun safe is basically the same buy slightly less intense. Follow the above steps and make adjustments where necessary – you won’t need as many people or as much strength. If the safe can be carried, be sure to have at least two people for added support. Set the safe down gently and be mindful of doorways, walls, and protruding objects when passing through hallways. Do not set the safe on top of anything else – it’s weight may crush other objects.

Conclusion

best gun safe

This is one of the best gun safe

Now you know how to move a gun safe. The process is tough but can be enjoyable with friends and a good attitude. One thing to keep in mind is that when moving the gun safe to a new house, identify in advance the best location for the safe. In the garage or a room where it will not need to be moved ever again. If you enjoyed this article, please share. Knowledge is power, just like teamwork! If you have any tips or anything, feel free to leave them in the comments and we’ll get a discussion going. Check out my recent post about best ar10 scope

Which Is Better Between .260 Remington And 6.5 Creedmoor?

Do similar rounds produce similar results? Any experienced shooter will tell you that that is not always the case. For direct proof, look no further than the .260 Remington vs 6.5 Creedmoor. Both of these are a perfect match for the .308 Winchester rifle. In many cases, if you weren’t the one who loaded the rounds, you may not be able to even tell a difference.

My personal experience has led me to prefer the .260 Remington over the 6.5 Creedmoor. We’ll get into why in this article. I’m old school, is the main reason. This guy pretty much sums up my thoughts on the .260 Remington in this video:

The old classic vs. the new hotshot

.260 Remington is a classic among long-time riflemen, having been the backbone of what we’ve used for such a long time. The reason for this is that seasoned hunters have expertise in reloading. .260 Remington rounds necessitate this, while 6.5 Creedmoor rounds are better for those without that reloading expertise.

As many new hunters aren’t trained in the art of the reload, Creedmoor can significantly reduce the learning curve when looking to get out into the field. Additionally, the Creedmoor has a shoulder angle that is sharper than the Remington. This comes with less body taper

Additionally, less water is held by the Creedmoor. This won’t affect certain shooters, but it’s worth noting. It can fit a longer bullet because of this, but the general use of handheld cartridges has all but eliminated any benefit there. Here, a video description of the two takes place.

High performance vs. low performance, and vice versa

The brass on the .260 Remington is of a higher quality than the 6.5 Creedmoor. With the Creedmoor, you may find that the brass isn’t as long lasting. This affects hunters as they experience less overall durability and flow with their shooting than if they were to use the .260 Remington.

The Creedmoor’s case is a bit shorter than the .260 Remington’s. The Remington is undoubtedly faster as a result of the higher case capacity, necessitating less maintenance in the field. Remingtons are better for those looking to use a bolt gun, but for the semi-automatic inclined, the 6.5 Creedmoor is the better choice. I’m always using bolt, so the Remington works for me.

When it comes to distance shooting, the Remington will be solid up to at least 800-900 yards.

Personal preference and skill level are a big factor

Beyond that, the accuracy can lose a bit of its dependability depending on skill and build. I’ve got mine accurate up to 1000, but I’ve been doing this for a long time. I will concede that the Creedmoor can perfectly nail a target from 1000 yards when built the right way and taken good care of. If everything is prepped correctly, that is the better option for really long distances.

I recommend keeping a chart of data from the rounds you fire with both. Test them out, and through your charts you can identify which one you are more accurate with, and which one makes the overall process easier for you. Keep track of powder, distance, velocity, and muzzle energy. I also encourage testing at different distances. Keep a record of 100 yard accuracy percentage compared with longer shots. Those who are new to long distance shooting should stick with the choice that they are the most comfortable with.

I also encourage shoots to watch some videos online of different practices with both options. Here are a couple great options:

  • Creedmore footage

  • Remington footage

 

Conclusion

At the end of the day, it really depends on personal preference. Take into consideration which bullets you plan to shoot, and whether or not you are willing to switch them to accommodate aesthetics or if you are hard lined on performance and personal comfort. I’ve grown so accustomed to the .260 Remington over the decades that I’m not going to be switching anything up at this point.

If you enjoyed this article, please share on social media – us gun freaks always love a good debate on equipment. Feel free to share your personal opinions in the comment section here, as I’m sure we’ve got a community of 6.5 Creedmoor users out there that have thoughts on the matter.

What Are The Best Scope For Ruger 10/22?

Perhaps the best part of using a rifle like the Ruger 10/22 is its sheer popularity among American shooters. The gun is very popular, and because of this, there are a variety of scopes and mod options that have become popular as well.

best scope for a Ruger 1022

Best scope for ruger 10/22 David Yonehara

I’ve been using a Ruger since my Dad first took me out hunting as a kid, and have become very familiar with the different scope options available.

Today, we’ll take a look at three options that are the best scope for a Ruger 10/22 and why they stand apart from others.

Top Our Pick For Best Scopes For Ruger 10/22 In 2017

Top 6 Best Scopes For Ruger 10/22 On The Market

This is my review about 6 scope for ruger 10/22 takedown on the market, it will help you find the best for hunting. Check out it:

1. Vortex Optics Crossfire II 6 - 18x44mm AO Riflescope, DEAD-HOLD BDC

Vortex Optics Crossfire II 6 - 18x44mm AO Riflescope, DEAD-HOLD BD

Vortex Optics Crossfire II 6 - 18x44mm AO Riflescope, DEAD-HOLD BD

If you’re looking for a best Ruger 10/22 scope that holds zero like an absolute rock, this is the one for you.

Many Ruger fanatics spend years looking for that extra bit of accuracy and momentum in the field, and Vortex Optics answered by taking a 12 and making it doable from further than a football field away.

Up to 500 yards is no problem with strong accuracy. Any worries of missing turret clicks are eliminated by the recurring sound.

They are also protected under caps, allowing for longevity and durability that entry level scopes can’t offer. 

Compared to other good scopes in its class, this one is the king. It easily stands its ground against top-notch offerings from elite manufacturers

​This is what you’re getting with this product:

  • Strong handling of recoil and any vibrations
  • Seamless performance in inclement weather
  • One of the most consistent eye pieces on the market, even with rapid fire and movement with ruger 10/22 takedown

2. UTG 3-9X32 1" BugBuster Scope, AO, RGB Mil-dot, QD Rings

UTG 3-9X32 1

UTG 3-9X32 1" BugBuster Scope, AO, RGB Mil-dot, QD Rings

There has been much debate about what is the best scope for a Ruger 10/22. We’re here to put an end to this argument. Hands down, the best scope for a Ruger 10/22 is the UTG 3-9X32 1" BugBuster Scope, AO, RGB Mil-dot, QD Rings.

Let’s break it down for any unfamiliar with the product:

  • If you find yourself setting up visibility for a particular situation only to find adverse weather or a change in plans, this scope is adjustable on the fly. It allows for simple and quick adjustable objectives for any range you’re shooting
  • Those needing to improve their aim will find this scope tightens any missteps in their process. The reticle is specifically built to eliminate aiming issues, with the added bonus of helping your overall performance
  • It upholds through rain, fog, direct sunlight, or just about any other weather condition

Among the scopes for a Ruger 10/22, this one stands apart for long-lasting, dependable performance.

Take it from a pro: there’s no sense wasting time and resources on flimsy pieces of crap. Go with the UTG BugBuster, hands down the best scope for a Ruger/1022

3. Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

Nikon P-RIMFIRE BDC 150 Rifle Scope, Black

When looking to step up the scope game significantly, this best scope from Nikon for ruger 10/22 takedown is the perfect piece of equipment.

Open circle aiming points are very accurate from 50 to 150 yards (I’ve actually used it for shots that I estimated were up to 200, but not with the accuracy of under 150).

The crosshair is right in the line of vision and never blurry or faded, something that is frequently a problem with cheaper scopes.

  • The Nikon Eco-Glass lenses are arsenic-free. They also are incredibly vibrant when in front of the eye – I’ve never had any issues with reflection or fog

  • Zero reset is required on elevation and windage. After you’ve zeroed the scope, there shouldn’t be any adjustments necessary to keep it accurate unless the mounting is altered. Move a click up, and it can be easily reset
  • Nikon has perfectly engineered this scope for .22 ammunition, and there is no better weapon for .22 than the Ruger 10/22. It is the perfect combination.

Make sure your on-hand mounts are made for the Ruger 10/22 – special order them if not.

Mounting and zero issues may result from mounts that are not for this specific rifle. Other than that, this is a solid scope and worth the spend.

My friend has bought a few of them for different .22s and always have been satisfied. If you’re looking to impress with a great gift, this is the best option available.

This is a good scope for ruger 10/22

4. Leupold 113872 VX-1 Rimfire Scope with Fine Duplex Reticle, Matte Black Finish

Leupold 113872 VX-1 Rimfire Scope with Fine Duplex Reticle, Matte Black Finish

Leupold 113872 VX-1 Rimfire Scope with Fine Duplex Reticle, Matte Black Finish

Leupold has the windage issue down with this ruger 10/22 scope.

In varied weather conditions, accuracy and ease of use remain largely unaltered.

Visibility is strong as well, although they reach the mid-level in this field at best.

This scope is ideal for rim fire and quick adjustments for moving targets, even in changing conditions.

No other brand beats them on that front.

It’s funny, as it seems that scopes with the strongest visibility struggle with windage and vice versa.

If Leupold really wanted to conquer the market, they’d address this issue – but they’ve got their niche down and a following that stands by their products. In its class, this scope is a solid addition.

  • Field-of-view range at 100 yards
  • Leupold’s incredible Quantum Optical System, which optimizes imagery sighting from one side of vision thru the other
  • This scope is built for windage and weather will work perfectly with ruger 10/22

This is a good choice for your ruger 10/22 takedown​

5. TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm 30/30 Reticle .22 Riflescope (Matte Finish)

TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm better scope for the Ruger 10/22

TascoRimfire Series 3-9x 32mm 30/30 Reticle .22 Riflescope (Matte Finish)

The TascoRimfire Series is top of the line, all the way. You won’t find a better scope for the Ruger 10/22 in its price range

The HD vision is superb. It really hones in on far-away targets and holds the view long enough to pull the trigger and get a good shot. I’m a fan because of these features:

  • The ruger 10/22 optics are fully coated. I’ve never had any sight problems with this scope, even after using it in multiple lighting scenarios and times of day.

  • ​The 50-yard parallax setting is standard and functional. Experienced shooters will find lines of sight to be as expected based on distance, terrain, and weather

  • The accuracy is spot on. Take it to the range once before heading out on a hunt and you’ll be completely comfortable with it.

One thing I always suggest with this scope is to purchase a separate weaver rail to go along with it. You can get one that is of much higher quality, and will last longer, than the one that Tasco makes. Also, buy additional scope rings if you don’t have any on hand. They will be necessary for proper and secure mounting.

Another hint is to make sure everything is properly mounted and fastened, so that the reticle doesn’t move.

If you’re using this scope regularly, check the security of the mounting each time you head out.Be sure to test it at both close up and further away shooting distances to get comfortable before forming your final opinion on the scope.

I found that it took a couple different scenarios before I fully grasped what it has to offer.

6. Simmons 511039 3 - 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

Simmons 511039 3 - 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

Simmons 511039 3 – 9 x 32mm .22 Mag(R) Matte Black Riflescope

The Simmons Riflescope is built with optical glass lenses that, in my experience, are incredibly functional.

For an economical .22 scope such as this one, that feature really stands out.

Their HydroShield lens coating that they brag about is optimized as well. Two of the three scopes we’re talking about today are far from the high-end market, proving that best Ruger 10/22 scopes don’t have to break the bank.

The eyepiece is bright and vibrant, allowing for easy target sighting and zero fatigue when following a target or working to find the best shot location on the target. The clarity cannot be beat.

Here are the best features:

  • ​The mounting rings that come with the Simmons Riflescope are not well-suited to the Ruger 10/22. As typical, I suggest buying additional rings and weaver rail. It can be mounted.

  • The rubber surface is easy to adjust, even in rain, heat, or damp conditions. Once zeroed, the scope is as accurate as anything on the market.

  • It mounts to other options, but seems to be specifically designed for the Ruger 10/22 due to its popularity.

Above all other scopes, this one gives the most bang for the buck. In the hunting world, that goes a long way because it allows more flexibility for other add-ons and modifications.

Conclusion

There are a variety of best scopes for a Ruger 10/22 on the market . These three are all well-suited for action, whether that be the range or out in the hunting field. The trendiness of rimfire shooting has led to the development of a lot of new scopes, but I always stand by the old classics. For mounting help, check out this great video.:

If you will reference this article in your upcoming scope purchase, we’d love it if you shared what you found helpful via social media. That way, others can learn more about the scopes as well.

I’d love to hear which one you ended up going with. Feel free to leave a comment here with thoughts and we’ll get a conversation going.